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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well this is just an "off the cuff" first try at weathering, in this case rolling stock. I used a really set of pastels. I only looked at a few pics of the prototypes, and it seems like they were all pretty clean looking?? I think it looks Ok, but I'm going have to practice a little more. I need to do a better job of making streaks down the side of the hopper. After I took this picture I spayed it with some dullcote. I'll have to wait until tomorrow to see how it turns out.




 

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Discussion Starter #3
So after I dull coated the grain hopper last night I moved on to my next victim. It was just a standard "Katy" box car. This time I used acrylic paint with a stiffer brush and boy I think it turned out much different. I believe there are two reason for this, one is that a box car with its rivet lines are a little easier to weather than a car that's smooth sided, and two, even though I didn't load the brush very much the color was much more pronounced. So for now I might use the chalks for lightly weathered cars and the paints for a more rustic look. I post a pick when I'm finished with "The Katy".
 

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My Dad taught me a trick the other day. Take the cheap modelling brushes (plastic bristles) and cut the end down to only maybe ~1/4" long. It will give you good stiff bristles to work with. I had a hard time getting the color to pop when I started weathering things. This really helped in getting the powders to concentrate in a particular spot. I'm using the Tamiya powders, but my father uses the AIM powders and they work a ton better.

http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/110-3100

They have a wide selection of colors and the pigments seem to be much richer or dense. (Easier to apply color)
 

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hi your weathering is getting there, try using a bit of red ocre chalk on a make up brush and then white and then some black. if you dont like it just wash it off with a brush and water. its just another method of weathering that you may wish to try. kind regards bob
 

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looks good. Things Ive found to work for weathering are to use black or dark brown acrylic paints watered down as needed with half water half isopropyl alcohol and applied as a wash over the car surface, particularly lower sides, which gives it a little more depth of color/grimey look. The alcohol breaks the waters surface tension so it doesnt bead up and you get a smooth wash even on plastic. Once dry I use pastel chalk usually a light brown sort of dust color over that and then finish it up with some dullcoat to take off the shine and make the chalk stick, works well.
 
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