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Discussion Starter #1
I am sure most here saw my "Box full of train stuff post" last week. Here is the little table I slapped together this weekend. I was able to lay some trial tracks and going to get some cork roadbed and start nailing down track soon. Wow a lot of work ahead! Too much fun. I am hooked big time dude! The HO Diorama accessories are endless. I was stuck on Ebay last night for hours looking at HO Train stuff. Also I am going to try and wire up all these track switches. Need too strip out some phone cord.

Did a little reading on track soldering / wiring. Do most of you solder your track pieces? Is it necessary? Or run a feeder line and tie-in every 3 feet or so? Anybody have a good link with some how to on soldering train track? I know how to solder and have the tools!

So far all the track switching works manually. Pretty cool considering I haven't done a Train in 25 years and that was a little oval at best! Comments or criticism welcomed!

Be sure and check this thread I will post progress pics here as our little world comes together!




















 

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What's to criticize?:thumbsup:
Looks like your off to a ripping start! :appl:
I do put drops every 3 feet to a buss and yes I solder all my joints.
Heat the rail joiner and rails right in the middle outside of the joint and apply a little solder to the ends of the joiner and let it wick in. Have a cloth ready and wipe the top of the rails to clean off extra stuff. After its all cooled wipe the rail joints with alcohol to remove any rosin off the rails.
If your thinking about DCC now or down the line drops and soldering are a must!
Sean
 

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Nice table work ... just don't light a fire in the fireplace, though! ;)

One tip I learned via a video that someone (wish I could give credt to who?) posted on the forum ...

When you solder your rail joint, place a wet cotton ball or two on the rails just forward and behind where you're soldering. The water will help to limit heat transmission away from your focused area, and minimize any chance of melting the plastic track ties.

Thanks for sharing,

TJ
 

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Awesome thanks for the quick replies! :thumbsup::thumbsup: Another question! :confused: Is the road bed cork necessary????? And best type of nails? Is there a type I can get @ Ace hardware instead of the $$ :eek: train store?? I guess I should do this before I run anymore wires or begin soldering?

Thanks, Rick :thumbsup:
 

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Hi Rick,

(Can you change your default font to something that's not BOLD?)

Cork is not mandatory, though lots of guys like it for two reasons: sound and vibration dampening, and it creates a mound that you can cover with ballast stone.

But model RR Rule #1 always applies ... it's your layout, you're the boss, and you should do whatever makes you happy!

Most hardware stores will have a small bundle of brads (tiny nails) that will mount the track to your chip board. Bring a section of track to the store to see which size and head style best fits your track (which likely has predrilled holes).

You might want to hold of on nailing everything down, though, until sometime after you've run the setup for a while, have debugged any problems, and/or find that you want to tweak some track positions.

TJ
 

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I like the cork because of the look and the sound quality.
Some people use foam as a base but if you want under table switch machines that makes it really difficult.
I don't use nails any more after a friend showed me that using latex caulking works sooooo much better and quieter too. Just spread a thin layer with putty knife and place track on top, pin in place with push pins allow to dry couple of hours then pull push pins. The major advantages of this is that if you want to chance track just putty knife it up and redo it, no more driving nails in too far and bending ties/rails, no breaking ties trying to remove nails.
Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Cool thanks TJ :thumbsup: The only reason I have a bad habit of typing like that for my blind eyes. Lol. Not really blind. Actually it seems to run really well. (Other than the plastic wheeled stock cars derailing occasionally) I am running it slow because fast seems to pull tracks apart. I guess I might nail it down and start wiring! Also I know I need a real Loco. This one is a Bachman cheapie rear wheel drive.

I'm going here right now to get supplies! My local shop. http://dynamichobbies.net/gallery/index.php
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here is a few update pics. I finally got all the roadbed glued down tonight now to nail it all down and start soldering track and running drop lines. This is cool! Like the biggest model I have ever built! All how I want to build it too! No real plan here!














 

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Folks he's almost got trains!
If I might give advice, Before you lay track on the cork, run a sanding block across it and look and feel for bumps and humps.
I have found that the track lays better if you do this!
If you've never put nails in track threw cork careful not to over drive the nails and bend the ties.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Folks he's almost got trains!
If I might give advice, Before you lay track on the cork, run a sanding block across it and look and feel for bumps and humps.
I have found that the track lays better if you do this!
If you've never put nails in track threw cork careful not to over drive the nails and bend the ties.


Excellent advice! Thanks Dude! Will DO! :thumbsup:
 

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looks good. you will appreciate sound properties of cork. board on frame is is resonating (think acoustic guitar) and can get quite loud.

If you've never put nails in track threw cork careful not to over drive the nails and bend the ties.
that's why its better to glue the track web down to cork.risk free, another layer of sound insulation (adhecive caulk does not transmit sound well) and it will look much better too - those nail heads sticking out really can ruin the picture
 

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I used a pin vise and a tiny (I believe #60) drill bit to pre-drill the holes for the nails to go through the cork and into the wood. I found that you have to excert a fair amount of force to push the nails into the wood (like particle board) and by pre-drilling a little undersized hole you can still get the nail retention you need, but without risk of over-driving the nails accidentally.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
looks good. you will appreciate sound properties of cork. board on frame is is resonating (think acoustic guitar) and can get quite loud.


that's why its better to glue the track web down to cork.risk free, another layer of sound insulation (adhecive caulk does not transmit sound well) and it will look much better too - those nail heads sticking out really can ruin the picture
Hmmmmmm...............Any chance you could post a pic of your glued down track? What type of glue?

I set a few nails last night with a nail set and had good luck with no pre drilling.
 

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that's why its better to glue the track web down to cork.risk free, another layer of sound insulation (adhecive caulk does not transmit sound well) and it will look much better too - those nail heads sticking out really can ruin the picture
I don't nail my track down anymore either.
I use clear Latex caulking, thin layer of it and set track down pin with thumb tacks wait about an hour, pull thumb tacks, done
Glued down track before tie touch up.
Glued down track.jpg
After Ballast
Glued down track finished.jpg
 

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Hmmmmmm...............Any chance you could post a pic of your glued down track? What type of glue?

I set a few nails last night with a nail set and had good luck with no pre drilling.
DAP adhesive caulk. i use flex track and want the track to be attached along its entire length to keep it's form. nails will only hold it in several points.

pictures? sure. these go some time back however



 
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