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Hello, after a 38 year hiatus from train modeling my son and I are building a N scale set. So new to this. Its exciting yet overwhelming. I want to run DCC. Haven't figured out how yet tho. Thanks for this forum!
 
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Welcome aboard Hockey Fan. DCC isn't that difficult but there is a lot to learn when you're just starting out. Take some time for research and ask questions here. We'll try our best to help.
 

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Thank you! Someone sent me a PhD level diagram I'm sure I can figure out but your response is warming to my non technical skills. Although I like working with wiring. Thanks again!


UOTE=Country Joe;2402684]Welcome aboard Hockey Fan. DCC isn't that difficult but there is a lot to learn when you're just starting out. Take some time for research and ask questions here. We'll try our best to help.[/QUOTE]
 

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Welcome back....Dcc is challenging at the beginning because of its terminology, but addressing a loco, and configuring sounds are likely the two items you will learn quickly. The nice thing is if you screw it up, you reset the decoder. There’s lots of helpful people on this forum...cheers

I see your a “hockey fan”...Go Leafs Go
 

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welcome aboard.

There's really no complications whatever when
you install or use DCC on your layout.

It's utter simplicity. The innards may be complicated
electronics, but the use is as easy as using your TV remote.

A quick crash course:

A DCC system consists of a Power supply, and a
Controller. They plug in. You have 2 wires to
your track. The controller puts around 14 volts
modifed AC on the track AT ALL TIMES. That
current also carries the digital information that is
picked up by the loco wheels and fed to an on
board decoder. You press buttons on the controller
to select the loco you want to run, choose FWD or
REV and run up the speed control. That's it. But
it gets better, while that first train is running you can
you can punch another button and bring a 2nd, or 3rd
or more locos to life, controlling each individually with
your controller. Nothing at all complicated.

Now, where many beginners become concerned is when
they read of modifying the decoder's 'CV's. This is an
advanced operation that some enjoy, but it's totally
unnecessary for the beginner.

The most popular DCC makes are Digitrax, NCE,
MRC and Bachmann. All but Bachmann are full
feature systems. Bachmann lacks the ability to
fine tune decoders. Any controller can run any
loco with a decoder.

I'm sure you'll have questions. This is the place
to ask them. We old timers enjoy helping the new guys
get started, so ask away.



Don
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks!

Thanks for all the help! So we have our track at about 95% laid, but next is drilling the holes to run the wires underneath. So do i drill and run the wire to a central location, then invest in the DCC system? I have the good old KATO Power Supply that came with a set but its DC.

Another question: do DCC Controllers control the switches and the crossovers that are hard-wired as well?

So drill holes, and run all wires to a central location and then.....

Thanks again for your patience as we get this going.

Paul
 

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Welcome aboard! There is a forum here that is dedicated to DCC. I'd recommend checking it out.
 

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Most of us suggest that you have track drops
every 6 feet or so to an under table bus that is connected
by those TWO wires from your DCC controller.
You could run your track drops to a central point,
however most of us run the 'bus' along under
the table keeping the track drop wires relatively short.

The DCC controller can do a number of things in
addition to running your trains. If you invest in
stationary decoders it can throw turnout points.

However, many of us prefer powering turnouts
by an additional source such as an old DC power
pack through panel switches and buttons. The
DCC controller does not have 'accessories'
power terminals and it's output should be only
to the track.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks!

Don,

Thanks for your reply. I think i get what your saying about the "Bus" line from watching you tube videos. Basically,:eek: have 2 main wires, and then connect the power terminals to those two main wires to keep the runs short.

As for the switches, use the old DC turnout switches that i have seen from KATO that i can buy on ebay to operate the turnouts.

So DCC power to the tracks. DC power to the turnout/switches/crossovers.

Am i tracking?

Paul:eek:
 

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You're doing good.

The type of switches to control your turnout points
depends on the type of 'motor' you use.

Many of us use twin coil motors. (2 solenoids that
move the points). These require momentary 'buttons'
preferably powered by a Capacitor Discharge Unit (CDU)
that protects the coils from burn out. However, there
are Stapleton 751 D switches that do this, protect
the coils and provide
control of panel or track side LED signals. The
Stapleton and the CDU would require DC power.

The other popular turnout point mover is the
'stall motor' of Tortoise brand. It moves the points
slowly and requires only a double throw switch
but with DC power. The motors have built in
switches to control panel or trackside LEDs.


Don
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Request to move Thread

Hello, thanks to all the responses, but I have made a newbie mistake. Is there a way we can take this thread to the DCC thread and get it out of the Intro thread? I do not wish to violate the rules. Thanks!
 

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Probably, it would be best to continue this thread
to a natural solution. Then, when you have a
new question start a new thread in the appropriate Forum.

Don
 

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The Walthers switch machines are DCC ready and can be controlled from the hand held controller. You will need a power distribution card which is about $8 and can power up to eight turnouts. If that isn't enough, the distribution cards can be daisy chained together for unlimited control of your turnouts.

You wire power to the distribution board just like you would a track drop, plug in the included cabling to the switch machine and program it. Done. The Walthers machines will also control two or more separate signal aspects via the two lever snap switches included and mounted. They operate whether or not they are hooked up to anything so you may as well use them.

 

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Welcome aboard!

Hello, after a 38 year hiatus from train modeling my son and I are building a N scale set. So new to this. Its exciting yet overwhelming. I want to run DCC. Haven't figured out how yet tho. Thanks for this forum!
Hockey Fan;

Welcome to the forum!

I don't know why DCC would require anything anything like "a PHD level diagram."
Wiring a layout for DCC consists of connecting two wires from the DCC controller to the track. Then it would be. "Congratulations Dr. Hockey Fan, you have just wired your layout for DCC!"

Seriously, it's that simple. If you plan on building a really large layout, you might need to add "bus wires" (a 14 gage wire running parallel to each rail of the track) and "drop/feeder wires" (20-28 gage wires connecting each rail to it's bus wire) The feeders would be set about 6-8 feet apart along the length of the track.

However, if your planned layout is closer to the 4' x 8' type, (from your photo it looks like it is.) then the "two wires only" system will work fine. You won't really need bus wires, and multiple drop/feeder wires on a small layout. They won't hurt anything if you have already wired them though.
If you would rather avoid installing DCC decoders in locomotives, you can buy locos with DCC already factory installed. For a DCC controller, I recommend the NCE Pro Cab. It is one small, hand-held, piece, simple to install (two wires) and simple to program & use. Cost about $200 retail but there are discounts & sales available.

There is a very good book on DCC available at https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/products/books It is "Basic DCC Wiring" by Mike Polsgrove.

The pdf files below are some I wrote for people planning on building a layout. Browse through them if you wish. They have information on DCC control, "DCC ready/friendly/compatible turnouts and lots of other model railroad stuff. They may answer some of your questions about how the hobby has changed. If/ when other questions come up, just ask here, and we will be glad to help.


Again Welcome;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:


View attachment WHERE DO I START 3.pdf

View attachment 1 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 2 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 3 & 4 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 5 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment 6 How to build a better first layout.pdf

View attachment All AboutTurnouts rev-3.pdf

View attachment MODEL RAILROADING ON A BUDGET.pdf

View attachment Model Railroad Terminology 2.2.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the help!

Hockey Fan;

Welcome to the forum!

I don't know why DCC would require anything anything like "a PHD level diagram."
Wiring a layout for DCC consists of connecting two wires from the DCC controller to the track. Then it would be. "Congratulations Dr. Hockey Fan, you have just wired your layout for DCC!"

Seriously, it's that simple. If you plan on building a really large layout, you might need to add "bus wires" (a 14 gage wire running parallel to each rail of the track) and "drop/feeder wires" (20-28 gage wires connecting each rail to it's bus wire) The feeders would be set about 6-8 feet apart along the length of the track.

However, if your planned layout is closer to the 4' x 8' type, (from your photo it looks like it is.) then the "two wires only" system will work fine. You won't really need bus wires, and multiple drop/feeder wires on a small layout. They won't hurt anything if you have already wired them though.
If you would rather avoid installing DCC decoders in locomotives, you can buy locos with DCC already factory installed. For a DCC controller, I recommend the NCE Pro Cab. It is one small, hand-held, piece, simple to install (two wires) and simple to program & use. Cost about $200 retail but there are discounts & sales available.

There is a very good book on DCC available at https://kalmbachhobbystore.com/products/books It is "Basic DCC Wiring" by Mike Polsgrove.

The pdf files below are some I wrote for people planning on building a layout. Browse through them if you wish. They have information on DCC control, "DCC ready/friendly/compatible turnouts and lots of other model railroad stuff. They may answer some of your questions about how the hobby has changed. If/ when other questions come up, just ask here, and we will be glad to help.


Again Welcome;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:



Thanks for all the help. I look forward to the next step which is wiring. I do not have a DCC controller/power station yet. Having a hard time deciding which one to buy and spend 100.00+ dollars or more in the dark. There is a hoppy shop up in Milwaukee I may go visit. Call me old school but i want to see it and feel it before i drop the money on it.

I have a Burlington Northern DCC decoder installed engine from Atlas as our test engine.

Glad this board is out here...thanks!

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #18
DCC enabled engine on DC track one lap and DEAD.


Ok group. Got the track all put together. One of my packs of tracks came with the old standard Kato DC power controller.

Had Bought this engine with DCC card already installed:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/MINT-N-Atlas-49904-DCC-Equipped-B30-7-Locomotive-Burlington-Northern-5490/254165193753?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

In the description it says the engine can do DC and DCC both. So fifured we would check conectivity of the track and have a test run. Put the engine on the track and powered up the throttle. Took the throttile almost all power to make engine move. Engine went around inner track once and stopped. Lights worked and such. But then nothing.

Ensured all was right, checked power, checked voltage in DC on track, all seemend good. The engine was not doing anyting.

So we quick set up a oval track, nothing special, hooled up the power, placed the engine on the track... nothing.

So the question is, did i ruin the engine? Did it "Burn Up"?

Any advice would be helpful.

Thanks.

Paul
 
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