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Discussion Starter #1
I have found the track numbering schemes for many roads, but can't seem to find Great Northern's. Anyone have the info or a reference I can go to.
 
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I'm a bit perplexed as to what you are looking for. Do you have an example from another railroad that you could share? You may want to have a look at some GN track charts, that may help you.

http://multimodalways.org/docs/railroads/companies/GN/GN 1909-67 SYSTEM TRACK CHARTS.pdf

Regards,
Jerry
Jerry, here is post from a 2006 thread discussion in the Trains Forum.

Here's how track numbering generally works with Union Pacific

001-099 = Yard classification tracks.
100-199 = Leads.
200-299 = Receiving tracks for inbound trains.
300-399 = Departure tracks (including mainlines).
400-499 = Storage tracks.
500-599 = Company service tracks such as material yard, locomotive shop tracks, fueling tracks, and RIP tracks for freight car repair.
600-699 = Interchange.
700-899 = Cash customers / industry tracks.
900-990 = Pseudo tracks used to store train consists in the computer system prior to departure or prior to arrival.
999 = the lost cars track.
There are exceptions, but the above list is generally how it works.

As many contributors have already pointed out, yard track numbering usually follows a pattern wherein track numbers increase the further the track is located away from the mainline. The old names for tracks die hard, so crews generally have to remember two descriptions for every track: what the computer calls it as defined by station number, yard number, and track number and what the employees call it such as "The Steam Track," "Fuel One," "The Egyptian Lead," "The Old Buzzard," "Bub's Stub," and so on.

A common system seems to be based on mainline direction then numbered outward. The UP system seems to be the most comprehensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm a bit perplexed as to what you are looking for. Do you have an example from another railroad that you could share? You may want to have a look at some GN track charts, that may help you.

http://multimodalways.org/docs/railroads/companies/GN/GN 1909-67 SYSTEM TRACK CHARTS.pdf

Regards,
Jerry
Jerry, the link to the engineering charts you provided basically answered my querie, especially the chart for the Longview, WA yard which was the clearest. Essentially GN appears from the yard charts to have used the geographical direction of the mainline then numbered out from that point designating tracks geographically on either side of the mainline. The Longview chart shows that they designated track purpose for the track number rather than the UP system where they numbered the tracks based on purpose.
 
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