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Discussion Starter #1
I have been doing much reading on Sticky threads here. A post I came across asked about building layout in garage. The poster asked about heat extremes of 90 degrees. He was answered that one could get "heat kinks". I had not thought of this.
The shed I am building my layout in can get well over 100 degrees in summer.
So far I only have layout on wood 48 inches by 144 inches with 1 inch foam. The track I plan on is Atlas code 100 HO scale on cork.
Should I not glue cork? Should I not glue track to cork?
What is heat kink and am I in danger of damaging track?
Thanks
 

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If you google "hot weather train rails", you will find images of extreme conditions.

Basically, if your track is nailed down with no gaps between sections, and it heats up, it expands with no place to go lengthwise. SO it pushes sideways.

Two ways to avoid it.
Build layout on hottest day, or
leave some gaps in the rails.
Not giant gaps, just about 1/16" to 1/8".
 

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Some members from down under call it a shed.
Some of their sheds can be really huge, like 20' x 40' and over.:)

I see your not from there.
Tell me more about your shed.
So, how big is yours?
Wood? Aluminum?
Is there a window in it? 2?
Is there enough room to work in it with the door closed?

By adding an exhaust fan you can reduce that 100* some.
They do sell small AC units too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sure Ed. My shed is ten feet wide by 14 feet deep. Stick built (2x4). I built it in 2011. Gamble roof. No windows. Double swing doors about 6 feet wide. Not insulated nor wallboard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Tried to post picture. I like the exhaust fan idea. Had not thought about that. I wasn't sure how much of a problem heat is or might be.
Thanks
 

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Tried to post picture. I like the exhaust fan idea. Had not thought about that. I wasn't sure how much of a problem heat is or might be.
Thanks
Here is a man from down under I think. Edit, yes he is.
See what he did if you want.

A 100* is HOT ! Anyway you can reduce that some would be nice. Unless you like hot, some do, I don't. :)

In this video he said in his shed is 110*? I think he said that, or it was 101*? Either way look at him I see the hot on him!
Now what he did might work, though some may not like the visual effects on their layouts.

 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the video. The heat pulled his nails. I like how he used screws on curves to allow for movement, but I don't like the look of screws in the timbers. Many things to consider.
 

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Another attempt at photo of shed.
My copy and paste for pictures.

What I do to post a picture,
1,When your typing your thread, look up top & click on the paper clip.

2,That opens a box then click browse.

3,That will open another box find your picture where ever it is in your computer. (say downloads,camera,files wherever your picture is.)
When you find the picture click on it then click open, it will then be in your box where you clicked browse.

4, Then click upload, wait to make sure it uploads. The minimize that upload box.

5, After it uploads go back to your post box where you are typing and click the paper clip again and click insert attachments.
(if you forget to go back your pictures will just show as a clickable link instead of a picture in the post. Go back and click the paper clip again after you upload and click insert all or if you only have one picture click on the link there a second time.)
Note, if the picture won't upload most likely it is too big.

Your picture should be in the thread.

If you don't see the paper clip let me know.
 

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2 windows would help a lot, you can create a cross breeze with it.
If you don't want windows some kind of vents on the roof would help pull the heat out.
A exhaust fan with an on/off switch should help?
I think there are some vents that work off solar power?
Exhaust fans too? But I am only thinking about you working out there.

But anyway you look at it a 100* is hot.
And in the winter it will be colder then cold.

For the trains,
Insulate, wallboard, add AC and heat with climate control for all year round and you will be set. :D
 

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Do you have electric running out to there?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Electric running out there is 20 Amp on 120 volts. Was for battery tender on tractor.
I have vent in back wall up high in peak. I think it is 4 by 12 inches. A small exhaust fan I think would do wonders.
Much like our mate in the video you posted, I also am not wanting to throw that much funds to heat and cool the shed.
 

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In summer, it's gonna get pretty HOT in that shed. Particularly with no ventilation.

You need some way to either:
- cool it (air conditioner)
or
- ventilate it, get air "moving through" it.

Kansas winters are gonna be tough on it, too... :(
 

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Some things to consider:

Nickel silver rail expands only 5 mm over 30 contiguous meters with a rise in temps of about 15 deg C. That's nothing, and can easily be handled with several 1.5mm gaps here and there, and letting the joiners slide...no soldering.

I'm not going to say that expansion isn't going to be a problem...it might be the deal breaker, so to speak. But the chances are much greater that it is dimensional lumber shrinking across the grain due to dryness...reduced humidity. Or, if your joints get much wider, it's that humidity has increased and expanded across the grain, pulling your rail joints apart some.

By all means, control temps to the extent you can, either with a shading material or ventilation. But the biggest concern should be swings in humidity inside the train room outside of 35% at the lowest and over 66% at the highest. If you've cut and assembled near one of those limits, then the other limit will impose a great strain on your benchwork and rails.
 

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I wouldn't worry about thermal expansion. As Mesenteria said, the track is not going to expand too much. And any curves will ameliorate any problems due to expansion.

A real railroad with miles of straight track can have problems due to thermal expansion and will sometimes give slow orders on hot days, but a model railroad with straights no longer than 14' won't be a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks mesenteria, I had no plans of soldering track. What a day to talk about humidity. Right now humidity is 84%. We got 1/4 inch rain last night and have a 70% chance of rain forecast over night tonight. Here in tornado alley this time of year humidity can and will change a great deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I wouldn't worry about thermal expansion. As Mesenteria said, the track is not going to expand too much. And any curves will ameliorate any problems due to expansion.

A real railroad with miles of straight track can have problems due to thermal expansion and will sometimes give slow orders on hot days, but a model railroad with straights no longer than 14' won't be a problem.
Thanks.
My railroad will be built. I guess if it buckles or kinks I will just go from there..
Thanks all of you.
 
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