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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a brass engine that was given to me. The only thing I know about it is what a Lionel repair guy told me: "The brass is a Japanese Tenshoda import, which probably goes back to the 50s or 60s. It is missing too many parts for me to repair it. If it was me, I would put it on eBay and hope there are several oldtimers out there with the right parts in their parts boxes to bid on it.".

I would really like to keep it and restore it to be able to display on my work bench. I tested the motor and it does work, but needs the brushes cleaned. What I would like to determine for sure is: Is it a GP? If so what series? If replacement parts are available, where can I find them? Will another manufacture's trucks and maybe motor work in the frame?

Any help or suggestions will be greatly appreciated :)

Link to album: http://www.modeltrainforum.com/album.php?albumid=290
 

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Schizophrenic Engineer
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I think you will need a doner. There are a lot of parts missing. What part of NC are you in?
 

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Looks to be an early Geep, fitting an Athearn drive into that would take a bit of doing but not out of the ordinary...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What do you mean by "geep" Shay and is there anywhere on the internet that I could found how to do that?
 

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This is a place where the fellow who said he can't fix it, may not mean exactly that. What he likely should have said is that he can't fix it at a price you would pay! That leaves a bigger question. Do you have the grit to learn how to fix it yourself? That is one way to get it done and at a price you can pay. I'm afraid the answer may be that you are not ready for that size project. It WILL take grit to do it. Grit, vast amounts of time and some expense but mostly lots of work. Looking at it as a project, I would first look at getting it running again. Since that requires getting the cover off, that's just my thinking. Then you will likely need to "invent" some parts. Those two red blobs of plastic look like all that is left of a flexible drive shaft connecting the motor to the truck. I would look for a replacement but in the meantime, I would make one. The handrails can be repaired, straightened of replaced. Can you solder or learn? You may need it to repair the can. Just some starters to think about. The missing topside parts might be replaced with plastic parts which are available.
Odds are good that you are looking at a GP-7. At that time frame there were not dozens of options yet. GP-7's were mass produced in large numbers. Look over some pictures and look at door, fan and vents to see if that matches. It may not match exactly and that was true of many even when they were new. It was a time when models were not produced to be exact but more to represent the item.

Best of luck, looks like a fun project to while away a lot of long nights!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the reply Pfun. I can solder and have a few projects under my belt, but your are correct, nothing on this scale. I have looked and some of these brass engines sell for a good bit on eBay, so the cost of rebuilding it is a factor as well. I find projects fascinating!!! Especially when I know nothing about it!!! LOL. I see this as my only chance really to owe one, so I think I will give it ago!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey D, thanks for the reply! Thats sound doable and I checked out the eBay engine, looks nice, very nice!
 

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What do you mean by "geep" Shay and is there anywhere on the internet that I could found how to do that?
Geep refers to Athearn's older GP7, GP35, GP40, etc...

The "How to" would better come from older Model Railroader mags when fixes like this were rather common.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Okay I got it Sha and that is a good point. I will see what I can find on their website, ty!
 

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To make drivelines, you can also use flexible silicone fuel tubing intended for RC airplanes. I've done this on a few Athearn diesels with reasonable success. The key is to use the correct ID to fit over the motor shaft.... Some shimming may be required but can be easily accomplished with a bit of heat shrink tubing.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks Smoke for the reply and info. I have a friend who flies those planes. Im calling him today :)
 

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There may be another good product to try for the drive line. Heat shrink tubing comes in lots of different sizes and pretty cheap. By itself it is not strong enough to resist the twisting but if you use something like a dowel, small pipe, etc. as the center of the driveline and place heatshrink over it, you will have a way to get a really tight fit at the ends. I use the tip of the soldering iron too shrink it to fit. Then if it still tends to slip as power is applied, I have drilled a tiny hole through at the end and used wire to pin it together to stop slipping. It will need to flex so you can't use a solid item for the full length. Harbor Freight for heat shrink??
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Sounds like a good place to start P! Thanks for the reply and the info! If you happen to have a lead on where ibvant find another truck that would be awesome! Also does anyone know if the other truck would be powered?
 

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Sorry, I did not notice that there was a truck missing! Wow, That may be a biggie to solve. If the motor has shafts out both ends and sets in the middle, then it is likely the second truck was powered. Perhaps you can tell by looking for how the motor and trucks might have fit together?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
From what I can tell, the motor only has one shaft going toward the truck that is attached. But what befuddles me is, on the bottom side of the loco, there is a shaft coming out of that truck headed to where the fuel tank would normally be. So wjat was the purpose of that shaft? So, if you look only at the motor, you would think the loco is a single powered truck unit. But if one looks at the shaft coming out of the truck....
 

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From what I can tell, the motor only has one shaft going toward the truck that is attached. But what befuddles me is, on the bottom side of the loco, there is a shaft coming out of that truck headed to where the fuel tank would normally be. So wjat was the purpose of that shaft? So, if you look only at the motor, you would think the loco is a single powered truck unit. But if one looks at the shaft coming out of the truck....
That would go to power the rear truck, a common practice back then. One of the reasons I suggested Athearn drive parts is that they could easily replicate the type trucks that model already has, as well as proved a way to repower it with a modern can motor and/or flywheel set up inside the shell...much like I did this ancient Varney>>>



 
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