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Discussion Starter #21
The new loco arrived yesterday, and I was rather surprised at how small it is. It is very similar in stance to my HOn3 2-8-0, but the swell in the back half makes the boiler on the 4-6-0 a little larger. Since my line is based around 1905 with second-hand equipment these smaller locos actually look pretty good here, but I realized I have another problem now. My 0-4-0 switcher looks like a monster next to these other locos! Does anyone happen to have any suggestions for a smaller switcher that might fit in here? I noticed the Baldwin 0-4-2t could be a possibility, but wow, where would you even put the DCC decoder?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Oh that's nice looking! Any chance you could get me a measurement of the driver and boiler diameters so I can get an idea of the overall size?
 

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There's a real dearth of early 1900's small locos. The Bachmann models - the small-driver 4-6-0, the Baldwin 4-4-0, and the early Ma and Pa 4-4-0's fill the bill for road power. Pacific Fast Mail once imported a brass 0-6-0 for the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha (generally referred to as the Omaha Road) that would fit in if your budget can handle it. Check on evil-bay, where they do show up occasionally. I don't recall any worthwhile 0-4-0 models that would fit that period.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I also ran across a Baldwin 0-4-4 that looks like the appropriate size, except it appears to be a narrow gauge model and I could only find it available in ON30 and G. The 0-6-0 that Stumpy shared is also available with a saddle tank, but it looks like the saddle is about 20 years newer than the box tank style. [EDIT] Sorry, that was a Baldwin 2-4-4t that I had found.

@ebtnut -- I seeing your point, all the 'smaller' switchers that I'm finding available seem to have been made in the '20s or later and would dwarf my 4-6-0. But I'm also having trouble finding any info on what was actually used for yard work in the late 1800s. Perhaps they didn't have anything dedicated at the time and just used whatever loco was handy?

Oh I forgot to mention one surprise with my 4-6-0... The box contains two different style cabs. I think these are wood and steel cabs but I haven't had a chance to really look at them that closely. It's a real shame they're not making this model in the Spectrum line any more, I'll just have to stick with finding them on ebay I guess.

I finally got an update on the shipping for the tsunami decoder, it should be here on Thursday. Guess I better open up the tender tonight and see if I can match up the connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Hey Stumpy, sorry to bug you about this, but could you also tell me the height from the top of the rail to the top of the cab? I've been trying to scale pictures to figure out the size of this thing, and I'm getting everything between 1.625 up to 1.95 inches (although the lower number was worked from a larger picture). If the cab height really is 1-5/8 then I'm in business. If it's closer to 2" then that makes it as tall as my newer-style locos.

By the way, I did find that this model is supposed to have 50" drivers.
 

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Dedicated switchers were becoming common by the beginning of the 20th century. As I noted, though, models from that period are very scarce these days. And especially switchers, which aren't as useful to most modelers as road engines.
 

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Drivers: .51"... that's the tread, not the flange.

Boiler diameter: .65"

Overall length: 4.5"

Cab height is pretty much the same as the ten-wheeler, but I'll get an actual measurement this evening.

Did a little digging on the innernets last night and found this side tank built in 1919... https://locomotive.fandom.com/wiki/Brooklyn_Eastern_District_Terminal_No._12

Appears to me the Bachmann model is modeled after the tanks that were build for the Army in 1942-44.

http://www.railography.co.uk/info/cn_steam/profiles/xk2.htm

https://locomotive.fandom.com/wiki/United_States_Army_No._5002

https://www.oklahomarailwaymuseum.org/plan-your-visit/exhibits-grounds/equipment/locomotives/porter-0-6-0t/
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Cab height is pretty much the same as the ten-wheeler, but I'll get an actual measurement this evening.
That's the bit I was hoping for! Your pictures pretty well make the case that those two locos look like they belong together on the same line, which was my biggest concern. If you think by eyeball they are about the same then no need for further measurements, I'm sold. Thanks for the help!

From the info I've dug up, Porter had the 0-6-0T with the square tanks listed in their 1892 catalog. The saddle tank model that Bachmann has is built after a prototype from 1910 by Alco, but I didn't see when the saddle was first introduced. I'm surprised the saddle didn't completely replace the square tank style, I wonder what the differences were that kept both styles alive (perhaps just a trademark issue)? What I can see of the details, it looks like Bachmann used the same base for both models, changing only the water tanks and the cab.

I'm actually surprised by the price of this loco. It's from bachmann's Spectrum line, so it has a lot of higher detailing, yet it is half the price of the ten-wheeler and still comes with a DCC card. I'll probably end up getting two with the square tanks and one of the saddles, and am hoping to eventually end up with three of the ten-wheelers. That should finish off my standard-gauge lineup at least.

Oh I forgot to ask... what's the monster in the front of your third picture? Is it really that much bigger than the 0-6-0T and 4-6-0, or was it just the camera angle? The 6's look dwarfed in between that front one and the rusted-out loco in the rear.
 

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Interesting info. As was this bit from wikiknowitall...

"1878: Henry K. Porter continued the business on his own, as H.K. Porter & Co. He had established a reputation as a builder of rugged, specialized locomotives. He could custom build a locomotive quickly and efficiently, with a system of interchangeable parts; pistons, wheels and boilers in various sizes that can be combined to suit a customer's requirements. Some of the basic designs were kept in stock, and could be ordered literally 'off the shelf'."


Oh I forgot to ask... what's the monster in the front of your third picture? Is it really that much bigger than the 0-6-0T and 4-6-0, or was it just the camera angle? The 6's look dwarfed in between that front one and the rusted-out loco in the rear.
That's the 2-10-0 Decapod in the front & ol' rustbucket is a 2-8-0 Consolidation (with the leading truck missing). No camera trickery, they're that much bigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Yeah that makes sense about the size. My ten-wheeler looks tiny next to my 2-6-0 and 0-4-0, which is why I had the sudden concern about what I was going to do for yard equipment. To me smaller looks older, and the ten-wheeler looks like it fits right in with my HOn3 2-8-0.

Thanks once again to everyone for all the great info!
 

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I would point out that the Russian decapods were being built for the Russian government during World War I. A couple hundred were stranded when the Communists overthrew the Czar and voided the order. In that time period the U.S. government took over the U.S. rail system (the USRA) and distributed these locos to several different railroads. They had to get new extra-wide tires for the drivers since the locos were built to Russia's 5 foot gauge. The pilot truck and tender wheels also had be replaced or regauged. A few lasted into the 50's, and a couple have been preserved. There is one in operating condition at the Illinois RR Museum.
 

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Hey, just popped up in the Union Station section - photos of two New Haven locos from around the 1890's - a 4-4-0 and an 0-6-0 that would fall right in your period.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Nice, I don't normally check in that area so I would have missed it! That 0-6-0 looks right in line with what I'm looking at, but I'm not sure about the 4-4-0. Judging by the people standing next to it I'd guess that loco is at least a couple feet taller and has a larger boiler on it. Good info about the domes in that thread too, I had always thought the fluted domes were the older model.

[edit] Oops, I read that wrong. I though it said the 4-4-0 was from the 1860's, not the 1890's... So I guess the fluted domes ARE older.
 

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
I finally got the chance to put the tsunami into my 4-6-0 yesterday. Made a mistake already, I had read that the board already in the tender provided the resistance needed for the LED headlight. That may have wrong, it only seems to provide resistance when in DC mode. I can't tell if I simply have no working headlight, or if it's just not turning on. I can't seem to get ANY of the function keys to work. For example, F2 should blow the whistle, and F8 should mute all of the sounds. Since I've never tried to use functions under DCC++ before I don't actually know where the problem lies.

[Edit] I figured out the function problem, but I'm still not getting a whistle. Instead all I get is the sound of static. I've tried changing to a number of different whistle sounds and they all just sound like static. Makes me wonder if someone forgot to load those sounds into this chip? [end edit]

So the circuit board that come pre-installed in the tender... does that do anything except provide DC functionality? I mean do I really need to keep that board in there if I'm wiring for DCC? It takes up quite a bit of space and prevents me from using any kind of baffle behind the speaker, so hopefully I can just trash it.

By the way, loving the back-EMF feature of the tsunami to adjust sound volume! I didn't even notice it until one of the pilot wheels derailed and I pulled back the loco to get it back on the track. I also warmed up the 3D printer to make a small baffle for my speaker (currently running without the tender shell in place) and even a small one makes a noticeable difference. I'll have to whip up something a little better once I know how much space I have to work with.

Oh, I should also ask... what are the proper number of chuffs per driver revolution? I thought it was four but that just seems too fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I designed a better speaker baffle and printed it up last night, wow the sound was even more incredible. I had to turn down the volume but was able to start fine-tuning the equalizer. The new baffle has a slot that is a perfect fit for the speaker to sit in, plus a couple openings for the wires to come out through. I think I'll be mounting this speaker to the tender floor since there's no room to add a speaker under the coal load (where I could hide the sound holes).

I'm still having trouble with the whistle, but apparently the sounds ARE in the chip. I found that F9 signals a grade crossing, and as far as I can tell that also uses the same whistle sound files? Well the grade crossing sounded off just fine, which makes me think the whistle effect is working fine. However whenever I hit F2 or F3 (long and short whistle) I just get a static sound. Or maybe it's a hiss? It certainly doesn't sound like a whistle.
 

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In regard to tenders and steam-era switchers: I had been looking at an unlettered Bachmann 0-6-0 to match up with a Spokane, Portland & Seattle caboose and my collection of Pacific Northwest-themed wooden reefers - but the Bachmann has a coal tender and all of the SP&S's 0-6-0's were oil-burners. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #39
I converted my Bachmann 0-6-0 to a 2-6-0 and replaced the original slope-back tender with a larger long-haul tender to give it a different look (both were made by Bachmann). You might be able to find a suitable wood tender to pair with an existing loco, or just cut out the coal and kit-bash the tender into what you are looking for.
 

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It gets back to the old "What's close enough for you?" question. Portland, OR was a "bring your own coal" town, and of the 7 SP&S 0-6-0's, 6 were assigned to either Portland or Vancouver, WA (and therefore oil-burners). Although it's not an exact match, the Bachmann is "close enough" to Northern Pacific 924 and I suppose it's not implausible that an NP switcher could be moving 3 cars and an SP&S caboose around the Pasco hump yard. But for the same $$$ I can get a Kato non-DCC Northern Pacific NW2, and there are pics of one of those in the Pasco yard. Decisions, decisions. :)
 

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