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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
After that my instinct is to pay Don 87 time his normal rate to do it right. Unfortunately that's just a bit expensive... That was supposed to be funny, that part of it..
:LOL:
 

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What Don F said.

Now go back and look at the pic in the OP. The wall is more than one brick thick.

One course is two bricks deep laid long-ways. The next course is one brick turned 90 deg. @Don F , wuzzat called?
 

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What Don F said.

Now go back and look at the pic in the OP. The wall is more than one brick thick.

One course is two bricks deep laid long-ways. The next course is one brick turned 90 deg. @Don F , wuzzat called?
We called those header courses. In a common bond wall, every 7th course would be a header course. This gave strength to the wall by tying in the inner and outer courses of the wall. Walls were also 12 " thick, 16" thick and so on. The inner wall would use cheaper "common brick" while the outer wall, that which is seen and exposed to the weather would most often have a harder burnt, or kiln fired brick to withstand water. Common brick are usually very soft and absorb water easily. When laying common brick, they were often dipped in water, as they would absorb the moisture from the mortar, which resulted in a weaker bond. In the good old days before the advent of cinder and concrete block, bricks were laid by the millions. Stone was also a common building material, and were often used together. I could go on for days! I was just discussing a similar scenario on another model train forum concerning the ornate old buildings of the past.
 

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Looking at that picture I thought of something, I'll probably explain it wrong. But what if instead of having the bricks on the outside of the mold/cardboard you assembled the bricks on the inside of it. That way you simply press the bricks against the mold/cardboard, you wouldn't have to do much trimming of the bricks and when you pull the cardboard away all the bricks would be flush. The inside wouldn't look good but typically you don't see the inside.
 

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Probably what the TS doesn’t want, but here’s my two cents.
Instead of building up the crumbling brick wall, in an additive process brick by brick... use a subtractive process. Like how the original wall fell apart.
Using brick sheet, mark out where the bricks have fallen from. Drill out the openings and finish with sharp blades and a file. Back the cutout piece with another brick sheet.
Detail with individual bricks either cut from strip styrene, scraps of brick sheet or even a few scale bricks.
 

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I'd rather try to make a sheet of simulated bricks look realistic, in HO anyway, than stack HO bricks, one by one.
What I immediately do to plastic structures made to be brick is to take sand paper across them all.
It' dulls them and gives em scratchier texture and to make grouting come out and look a bit powdery..
But O and larger scales I think it works great; individual brick laying here and there....
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
And here they are. All 1200 came in a rolling paper.
Good on you for posting a photo...
I intended to, but I got sidetracked.
Got beat on my own thread! :LOL:
 

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I only counted 1167 bricks in the photo....you might want to count them to verify that you got 1200.....I can see the bricks being useful for scenery (ie like of bricks, or some on a pallet, etc)....cheers😀🍩
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
About ready to give up
I wanted very much to duplicate the O-scale wall...
But with bricks half the size, it makes the project more than twice as difficult.
A veritable tweezer nightmare.
Eeesh!
 

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About ready to give up
I wanted very much to duplicate the O-scale wall...
But with bricks half the size, it makes the project more than twice as difficult.
A veritable tweezer nightmare.
Eeesh!
That’s why I create my own latex forms for brick walls. I pour a wall in stripwood forms. With an X-acto knife and dental picks, I carve in mortar lines. Then, I make a latex mold. As in my previous post, I create negative space by removing bricks with a drill and knife. I back that with. A full casting.

The individual bricks can be piled up and glued with dilute wood glue. If you want (and I suggest that you do), make another latex mold of the loose bricks.
 

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A veritable tweezer nightmare.
Eeesh!
Yeah, as soon as I saw them I knew they would be never be anything more than part of a load of rubble in a gon. At least you tried.

I wonder if you could carve up brick stacks.

 

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Some kind of tool or form or both to more easily lay down the bricks... But you'd have to invent that first.
 
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