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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm selling 2 sets of 5 figures each one of miners handmade and fully handpainted for myself.
I've sculpted each one original figure and made each mold and resin castings.

Set #1:



Set #2:



This is the set in your bag:


Each set of 5 figures is usd$ 15.
Shipping and handling is usd$ 8 up to 100 grams (more or less 15 sets for same shipping costs).
At your service for any other question.
Kindest regards from Buenos Aires-Argentina:

Leo
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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Very nice Leo.:thumbsup:
Looks like twin brothers in the top set.:laugh:

You ought to make some O gauge.:D

Some S gauge too, (yes some still model S. :laugh:)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Very nice Leo.:thumbsup:
Looks like twin brothers in the top set.:laugh:
Ja, ja, ja... yes you right.
Thanks you for words about my work.

You ought to make some O gauge.:D

Some S gauge too, (yes some still model S. :laugh:)
Yes, of courrrrrrse I'm planning to expand to other scales.
The problem is time. Each new sculpted figure demands many times.
Anyway I'll upgrade my new work frequently.
Thanks again and kindest regards from this "Mar Oceana's so faraway lands" (as said Colon).

Leo
 

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Hey Leo, I just posted pictures on the HO site for you.:D
 

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You're an incredible man, Big Ed.
Thanks you very very much.
I owe you.
Thanks again and kindest regards:

Leo

You don't owe me anything, glad to help you out.:D
 

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Leo, that is exquisite workmanship! Ed is right----S scale is gradually taking over the model railroading hobby here in the States, so that would be a logical progression. Best regards!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes, Reckers, you're right.
I'm so anxious to get S and O and also 1:32 scale figures (I think 1:32 is 1 scale).
Next days I'll post photos from work in progress on original figures in these scales.
I'm thinking (super anxious!) to sculpt a man playing a vertical piano at the Old West.
Would be a good idea to begin in S and O scales?
Cheers:

Leo
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Of course HO too.
My idea is try to sculpt same or similar figures in many scales at same time.
You can see more HO figures here:
Galileo Minis
Kindest regards:

Leo
 

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Of course HO too.
My idea is try to sculpt same or similar figures in many scales at same time.
You can see more HO figures here:
Galileo Minis
Kindest regards:

Leo
Leo, he meant that he was on the other site that I put the pictures on... the HO site.

Do you have any trains set up Leo? Looks like you could put together a nice layout with your modeling skills.
 

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Yes, Reckers, you're right.
I'm so anxious to get S and O and also 1:32 scale figures (I think 1:32 is 1 scale).
Next days I'll post photos from work in progress on original figures in these scales.
I'm thinking (super anxious!) to sculpt a man playing a vertical piano at the Old West.
Would be a good idea to begin in S and O scales?
Cheers:

Leo
Leo,

I'd recommend O scale as your next step. I was pulling your leg about S scale. I run S scale, but have to admit relatively few people do and I don't want you investing your time in a market with very few buyers.

That said, I think the piano player is a great idea: however, we call it an "upright piano" rather than vertical piano. It will sell better with that description.

Best wishes,
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Big Ed: I've gotten some locos thinking in a Argentine layout.
But passing time I've understood that I'll not be able to get a layout. Maybe in the future.
Anyway, sincerely talking, I love to do anything by myself. My dream is to get a little "Railway Museum" with all the rolling stock who has ever run on our ex "Ferrocarril General Urquiza" (General Urquiza's Railway).

Reckers: thanks you for detailed information. Anyway I think that some figures in S scale will be able as accessories for 1:64 scale cars as Matchbox, Hot-Wheels, Johnny Lightning, ecc.

Regards:

Leo
 

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Big Ed: I've gotten some locos thinking in a Argentine layout.
But passing time I've understood that I'll not be able to get a layout. Maybe in the future.
Anyway, sincerely talking, I love to do anything by myself. My dream is to get a little "Railway Museum" with all the rolling stock who has ever run on our ex "Ferrocarril General Urquiza" (General Urquiza's Railway).

Reckers: thanks you for detailed information. Anyway I think that some figures in S scale will be able as accessories for 1:64 scale cars as Matchbox, Hot-Wheels, Johnny Lightning, ecc.

Regards:

Leo

Do you mean you would like to start a museum with something like this in it?:D
Have you ever been on this one Leo?
'La Trochita' :thumbsup:

Old Patagonian Express.jpg

Old Patagonian Express2.jpg

Old Patagonian Express
(look at those mountains! Leo's miners work in them.:laugh:)

For those who hate history skip the following!:eek:



And for those who don't know,:rolleyes:
Argentina is rich in old rail road history.

In the Patagonian southern lands of Argentina train lovers from around the world can find what has come to be a railways icon: The Old Patagonian Express, still running today on narrow gauge tracks only 29.5 inches wide.
The Old Patagonian Express was commissioned in 1945 and was affectionately christened by the locals as 'La Trochita' because its narrow tracks.

Until 1993 it was used as a welfare train and ran from Esquel up to Ingeniero Jacobaci in Rio Negro province, and today it is one of the major tourist attractions still running and providing its passengers with an outstanding panoramic view of a magical area of nature and history. 'La Trochita' has, after nearly a half a century, become a national historic monument of the Argentine Patagonian steppes.

‘La Trochita’ is worldly famous because it is the only narrow gauge track train in the world that’s still functioning, featuring American and German Machines from "The Baldwyn Locomotive Works" of Philadelphia and "Henschel&Sohn GmbH" from Cassal Germany.

According to the historical reconstruction, the Argentine Government requested for 50 Henschel Locomotives and 25 Baldwyn Locomotives to be delivered to Patagonia Light Railways in 1922. Originally manufactured by both firms to be able to be adapted to petrol combustion in stead of coal, these locomotives also feature a heavier weight that the average in these sorts of machines in order to improve its pulling capacity. This unique feature has allowed these locomotives to keep on functioning using all its original features until today: steam engine powered by paraffin petrol supplied by the El Maiten Railway Workshops, where the experts work upon the original blueprints and jealously keep this amazing train as close to the original 1922 version as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I want to cry, Big Ed.
As you said "Argentina is rich in old rail road history".
But lamentably there are almost nothing about that history.
Anyway fortunately there are a lot of people working in many clubs to get at least some of that so historically rich rolling stock.
Simply on the '50s there was 47.000 railroad's kilometers and actually no more than 34.000.
A 40% of little towns missing; actually "phantom towns".
A very sad story.
As you said there are some historical trains running today, but only as special tours.
Anyway from my childhood (from sixties to seventies... when the Earth was still hot :laugh:) I love one of the railway lines called in the past (when the railroads were administrated by the National State) "Ferrocarril General Urquiza" (General Urquiza Railways).
Specially the metropolitan service with a mix between electric cars and tramways.
Most of then were imported from Pacific Electric and Key System.
Here you can see them:
http://donsdepot.donrossgroup.net/dr123.htm
These are the trains I'll love to do for myself.
I'll need something I haven't: enough time.
Who knows; maybe in the future...
Kindest regards and thanks again Big Ed for your mention to historical trains:

Leo
 

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I want to cry, Big Ed.
As you said "Argentina is rich in old rail road history".
But lamentably there are almost nothing about that history.
Anyway fortunately there are a lot of people working in many clubs to get at least some of that so historically rich rolling stock.
Simply on the '50s there was 47.000 railroad's kilometers and actually no more than 34.000.
A 40% of little towns missing; actually "phantom towns".
A very sad story.
As you said there are some historical trains running today, but only as special tours.
Anyway from my childhood (from sixties to seventies... when the Earth was still hot :laugh:) I love one of the railway lines called in the past (when the railroads were administrated by the National State) "Ferrocarril General Urquiza" (General Urquiza Railways).
Specially the metropolitan service with a mix between electric cars and tramways.
Most of then were imported from Pacific Electric and Key System.
Here you can see them:
http://donsdepot.donrossgroup.net/dr123.htm
These are the trains I'll love to do for myself.
I'll need something I haven't: enough time.
Who knows; maybe in the future...
Kindest regards and thanks again Big Ed for your mention to historical trains:

Leo
:D

Pick up this one that is in the link you provided, the last picture.:thumbsup:

hp1.jpg

You can put it in your back yard and after you fix it up a little you can use it for your sculptures.:laugh: (and a start for the museum.):D:thumbsup:

A lot most likely don't know about the RR history of Agentina.:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I want to cry looking this car...
The only "survivor" of 3100 electric cars.
Yes, I'll love to get it in my back yard, to be used as railroad exhibit room.
About RR history of Argentina is very particular.
For example we have 4 different gauges: broad gauge 1.676 mm, standard gauge 1.435 mm; narrow gauge 1.000 and finally meter or industrial gauge with 750 mm.
The rolling stock was imported (in different ages) from England, France, USA, Spain and Portugal.
There was very few trains (locos and cars) made in Argentina.
But this is another history.
Cheers:

Leo
 

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Thanks for the very interesting Argentinian RR history lesson, guys. I have friends who've been to Patagonia, and they say it's beautiful.

Cheers,

TJ
 
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