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Did the townhouse thing once. Never again. Perfect example: two year old development road in perfect condition. Road paving company made contact with the HOA. All of a sudden patches of pavement rolled over perfect road way. At the next HOA meeting, I asked "Was' up?" President said: "The Paving company said we need to pave." I said: "What did you expect them to say? Don't pave."
 

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Well Mike, we don't take the the vendor's word for what needs doing. If you have incompetent HOA board members, that's the kind of crap that happens. One would wonder if some pockets were getting lined in that scenario.
 

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HOA, never again.
Personal interest projects, poor source selection process, people let their power go to their heads and destroys what used to be neighborly people.
 

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HOA, never again.
Personal interest projects, poor source selection process, people let their power go to their heads and destroys what used to be neighborly people.
Whatever blows your hair back. Usually, the issue with HOA boards is the fact that the residents are too lazy to learn what the issues are or monitor the activities of the board. There's an election every year, and terms run two years. If someone doesn't like what I'm doing, they can organize the residents and vote me out, I won't mind at all. I really wanted to be involved so I could have some say in how we managed the funds and kept the community looking like it did when I bought here.

When we have the annual meetings, out of 173 residents, we have maybe eight or ten show up. Not exactly a high level of participation.
 

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When we have the annual meetings, out of 173 residents, we have maybe eight or ten show up. Not exactly a high level of participation.
Sounds like a typical city, county, state or national election in America.
 

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Whatever blows your hair back. Usually, the issue with HOA boards is the fact that the residents are too lazy to learn what the issues are or monitor the activities of the board. There's an election every year, and terms run two years. If someone doesn't like what I'm doing, they can organize the residents and vote me out, I won't mind at all. I really wanted to be involved so I could have some say in how we managed the funds and kept the community looking like it did when I bought here.

When we have the annual meetings, out of 173 residents, we have maybe eight or ten show up. Not exactly a high level of participation.
In our area the issue is that they insist on holding meetings at a time when most people can't make it. 5pm on a weeknight is NOT helpful for working families. Fortunately our HOA is pretty well grounded... Mostly. We actually left or Kay neighborhood (partly) because the HOA was just out of control.

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The dues in the HOA that I left in 2011 was over $1500 a year. Over 2500 homes and It included a gate security that everybody knew the magic words to get by, plus it only took one homeowner to open the community to anyone. Dues covered a marina that only served about 150 members, a horse stables that served about 70 members, about 20 miles of road that needed repaving every 5 years, a golf course that had only about 60 members. Yeah, the board knew how to dream up the projects.
 

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Ken, those issues you describe can be directly laid to the feet of the residents. If the board's actions were such a problem for a majority of the residents, they should have voted for a new board. You put a government in charge and then never went to the polling booth when you didn't like the results.
 

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My viewpoint is no HOA, they might be good in -some- cases, but it winds up that if you ignore a problem, it seldom goes away by itself, lol
 

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Mostly hate HOAs but perhaps they make sense in higher density neighborhoods. generally speaking you (seem to) end up a certain kinds of people on the boards. my attitude is most of the time people will fix up their houses to sell them ... eventually. still sometimes not.
 

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Ken, those issues you describe can be directly laid to the feet of the residents. If the board's actions were such a problem for a majority of the residents, they should have voted for a new board. You put a government in charge and then never went to the polling booth when you didn't like the results.
You're absolutely right. Most residents don't know to much about where all that money was going. The periodic board meetings were attended by less than 10 people. The monthly news letter was discarded like a flyer for used carpets without reading it. The voter turnout for board members was usually less than 300 mail in ballots cast. The board members realized the apathy and took full advantage of it.
 

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Out here in SoCal HOA's are mandatory for many areas based on the master land use plans. Some are gated with private streets, some are not. Most of them are well run by a professional management company under supervision by the Board. Our plan is gated and the annualized dues are $5,000 which is in the lower cost quartile for gated communities. A lot of that cost is driven by slope maintenance, brush clearance and fuel modification zone irrigation. Road maintenance is a small percentage of the HOA costs.
 

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While I don't necessarily like everything about living with an HOA, for any kind of cluster housing, even some pretty upscale places, I think some sort of management is pretty much mandatory. First off, you need someone to manage the maintenance of anything that is common property, maintain several miles of streets, do the landscaping, clear the snow, etc. Also, maintain the health club, tennis court, and playground has to be managed by someone. Another key aspect is after paying more than $400K for my place and putting more money on improvements, I don't want the possibility of someone creating an eyesore next door with no recourse. It's bad enough when you live in a single home and next door is a virtual auto junkyard, but if you live in a townhouse situation, it would be much worse. You can look into the cities right now and see what it's like to live with no rules, how would you like that coming next door?
 

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Yeah, some people just can't see what their menagerie looks like to other people.
I bought into this small community, one no outlet street that ends in a cul-de-sac with another cul-de-sac off one side, about 35 homes. About 2 acres of common area at the entrance with a grass lane divider, about 50 long. The street is state owned and maintained. I've been cutting the grass at the entrance for the past few years after the builder was letting it go way to long. Looked like the entrance to a trailer park. Other folks are taking care of the shrubs.
A new neighbor who bought a new house across the street from me got his house settled in then right away starts assembling a huge spread of stuff across his front yard. Looked like a junk dealer in Tijuana, only missing hub caps. Someone must have talked to him because within a few days, it all came down and he planted grass where the previous grass had been scalped out.
I've talked to just about every neighbor now and they are all except one, against an HOA. The builder will be turning the community over to the homeowners pretty soon as he has finished building this out. Word has it he will just sign off a quit claim deed on the property up near the highway to get out from under it. I'm pretty sure state law says he needs to have someone to accept it though. I really don't want to get stuck with the annual property taxes on it.
 

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View of a city dweller...
Mandatory HOA, no thanks. I'll take care of my place the way I want to. The money I hear about folks spending for assessments rivals my tax bill, and I'd rather be the one to decide how that gets invested in my property.

On the other hand, i am a dues paying member of a neighborhood HOA, but that's a voluntary community advocacy organization.
 
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