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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I just got a set of the Woodland Scenics inclines and they integrated into my layout even better than I had hoped. This is my first time building a layout that will include landscaping. What have you all used to cover the styrofoam with? Again beginner here so I am looking for something that I can glue to it.

Have you run into anything that can get glued on like a wallpaper with the correct HO scale bricks or something similar that I may not have thought of?

Thanks
Jai
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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Hello all,

I just got a set of the Woodland Scenics inclines and they integrated into my layout even better than I had hoped. This is my first time building a layout that will include landscaping. What have you all used to cover the styrofoam with? Again beginner here so I am looking for something that I can glue to it.

Have you run into anything that can get glued on like a wallpaper with the correct HO scale bricks or something similar that I may not have thought of?

Thanks
Jai
Welcome, do you want to do them all brick?
Not saying this one but there are many different brick patterns you can buy.
Self adhesive, but I would add a small amount of glue when applying.
There are other ways to cover them.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome, do you want to do them all brick?
Not saying this one but there are many different brick patterns you can buy.
Self adhesive, but I would add a small amount of glue when applying.
There are other ways to cover them.

Very cool! Thank you for sharing.

I am planning an Era I layout so I am trying to think of building material that would have been popular at the time. At that point I would think that brick would be the most popular building material. I don't think they just covered the sides of inclines with grass and rock like they do now... (I think)

I am not apposed to other building materials.
 

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Railroad Tycoon
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Very cool! Thank you for sharing.

I am planning an Era I layout so I am trying to think of building material that would have been popular at the time. At that point I would think that brick would be the most popular building material. I don't think they just covered the sides of inclines with grass and rock like they do now... (I think)

I am not apposed to other building materials.
Some will cover them with a plaster like material, there are a few to choose to plaster it in.
You could add different things, like the brick and paper, they sell rock patterns too.

Depending on your preference & Depending on your layout.
How big is it?
Do you have crossovers bridges or trestles? Culverts? Rivers, a lake?
What are you planning?

This picture is not mine.


White Wood Flooring Floor Road surface
 

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I would think it would depend on where the risers are located. Are they in a town setting? If so I would say more than likely some form of brick or stone. In the mountains maybe they blasted through the mountain to make a flat area for the track. In the prairie you would see the track on grass covered dirt or on top of a large pile of rock. The setting would probably be helpful on ideas to use
 

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I think a lot of things could work. But I used woodland scenics shaper sheet. I think it was mainly cause I had some on hand. Then some sculpamold to cover seams.. then paints. I got a kind of vertical granite wall with track on top which is what I was going for... It was some work honestly but it worked for me.

If I was going for some other look I might consider besides various mentioned above some kind of pre sanded grout.
 

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To an extent, the answer depends on what type of terrain you want to create. You can use a variety of "wall cards" to simulate man-made textures (brick, field stone, cut stone, concrete, corrugated steel), or if you want a more natural terrain look, some kind of hardshell over a framework of some kind. Framework can be window screen, cardboard strips, balled up newspaper, or just about anything else that will hold its shape. Hardshell can be actual plaster cloth, or many other items (used dryer sheets, shop towels, medical gauze) dipped in plaster, papier-mache, or just plaster over a mostly impermeable surface.

Then there are other things you can use to just build terrain: extruded foam insulating panels or florists foam laid wedding cake fashion and carved, then covered with plaster, drywall mud, etc; Woodland Scenics Shaper Sheet, even expanding foam insulation spray carved to shape. Molding plasters like Sculptamold can also be used, although it takes a lot of product to build large terrain features this way. I personally use a thin (1/8 to 1/2 inch) layer of Sculptamold as my top layer of terrain over my whole layout.

The good news is that there really isn't a WRONG way to do it. There are dozens of ways to skin that cat, and they all work just fine. It's really a matter of personal preference.
 
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In most of those situations, you don't have room for a natural slope, so either a rock face (again, dozens of options to chose from), or a simulated retaining wall using a wall card or styrene sheet would be your best bet.
 
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