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Discussion Starter #1
I have been making some home made wooden bridges. I want to be able to set code 100 rails directly onto the bridges.

WHen I google I can find info on using flex track , or even making my own turn out but neither is what I need, I would prefer to attach rails directly to the wooden slats on the bridges.

I have seen the gauges to set the distance of the rails. No idea where ti get the rail material nor the gagues

Thanks

Mark
 

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rail material can easily be obtained from sectional, or flex track, depending on how long you need it ... one continuous piece is preferable ...
and gauges, probably ebay, they are not expensive ...
 

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Pliobond contact cement. Also, if you looking for bridge ties try www.cvmw.com, they have some nice bridge ties (plastic) that you can glue rail to including Gauuntlet tie strips!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Pliobond contact cement. Also, if you looking for bridge ties try www.cvmw.com, they have some nice bridge ties (plastic) that you can glue rail to including Gauuntlet tie strips!
Not much info on those ties there nor how to use or anything. Seems important to say how you "set" the ties if they truly tie down the rails or if they are decorative. Calling was not much help either.
 

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If it was me (lazy, work smarter not harder)...

In the good old days, you could buy wooden ties with notches cut into them for the rails.
Can't seem to find them today on google.

Take some flex track, clamp it down to the work bench in a straight line (for straight bridge ;)

Every 4 inches along, solder a bare 14 gauge copper wire across the rails.
Then gently remove the ties (heat make easy work of this)
Now glue and spike the rail to the bridge.
Remove the copper wire before running trains:eek:
 

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The CVMW bridge ties have spikes molded into the tie plates. These spikes are bent over the foot of the rail using a 3/32" nail set. Look at the second picture down on the left side. This is how the rail is secured. I have these bridge ties for use on my bridge when I get around to building it. It's going to be a tedious job.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The problem with CVW ...I see nothing about quantity of ties though and when I called they gave me a cryptic answer not a quantity.

I like to know what I am getting.
 

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The problem with CVW ...I see nothing about quantity of ties though and when I called they gave me a cryptic answer not a quantity.

I like to know what I am getting.
It is not individual ties.
Notice the description has
Scale 25 foot

You are buying a single piece of plastic.
Not want you asked for in OP, laying rail on an already built wooden bridge.

Maybe it would help if you posted a picture of your bridge.
I have built wooden curved trestles using my method described above.

Also, google "ho track laying gauge" in SHOPPING
 

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Gauges

I have been making some home made wooden bridges. I want to be able to set code 100 rails directly onto the bridges.

WHen I google I can find info on using flex track , or even making my own turn out but neither is what I need, I would prefer to attach rails directly to the wooden slats on the bridges.

I have seen the gauges to set the distance of the rails. No idea where ti get the rail material nor the gagues

Thanks

Mark

Mark;

There are several different types of track gauges available. Kadee www.kadee.com makes one that is sold as a coupler height gauge, but it can also hold the rails the right distance apart. The NMRA (National Model Railroad Association) also sells a track gauge that can measure many critical things on a model railroad.
The one that might be most useful for your bridge project is made by Miller engineering. It's a plastic strip about 9" long with slots that are the correct distance apart that the rails go in. I used the N-scale version of this gauge today. Since you're going to glue your rails to the wood ties, its a good idea to put a little grease in the slots of the gauge before setting it over the rails. That way, the super glue, contact cement, or whatever glue you use, wont glue the gauge to the rails. If you google HO-scale track gauges you should find all three types, and others as well.
You can order track gauges from www.modeltrainstuff.com or www.trainworld.com The photo below shows the Miller Engineering long, gray, gauge on the left. The white ones on the right are no longer made.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:

Turnouts Miller track tools.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I thought I would post this for anyone who finds it useful.

Since I had no rail spacers, I made some. How?

Plasti Loka it is a formable clay like epoxy that dries hard.

First I soaped up the rails of the straight track. I had hoped this would prevent the plasti loka from sticking to the rails.

I rolled out a few pieces and pressed them over the straight track soaped rails. I made several rail spacers thinking some would be bad.



The next day they were hard and I removed them from the rails
They all came out just fine.

I then used them to set the spacing on custom rails.
 

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Good idea
New technology I guess.
I've used plaster for similar chores.
 
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