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Hoping to finally tackle the backdrop soon. I think I have found a really convincing way to use foam and create the look of distant tree covered mountains. (Pics to follow while underway)

My problem is figuring out what height to set as the horizon line.

Are there any "do's" or "don'ts" for setting up distant hills / mountains? Any suggestions for number of "layers"?
Is there a height that is too high?
Any tips or resources to point to?

Thanks,
~Kingred
 

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just depends a lot on the backdrop height and what is the height on the outside (backside edge of layout) Photos would help really.
 

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There was an article I read in Model railroader recently, not sure if it was a back issue. but one thing the author did was to take the color of the ground where it met the back drop and paint that up about a half inch onto the backdrop itself. It hid the line where they joined.

As far as the horizon, it depends on how much ground you are going to show in your backdrop, the further out your image, the higher your horizon should be. Its easier to do a distant horizon and keep it simple. This would mean setting it a bit higher. however the issue with a distant horizon comes up later when you try to scenic and "blend" it in and have no real middle ground, which creates the need to cover it with buildings and foliage.

Of course, not sure all of that helps...It still does not give you a measurement. I like to keep the horizon low enough (a few inches) that I can cover some of it with the buildings & trees etc.

Craig
 

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There was an article I read in Model railroader recently, not sure if it was a back issue. but one thing the author did was to take the color of the ground where it met the back drop and paint that up about a half inch onto the backdrop itself. It hid the line where they joined.

As far as the horizon, it depends on how much ground you are going to show in your backdrop, the further out your image, the higher your horizon should be. Its easier to do a distant horizon and keep it simple. This would mean setting it a bit higher. however the issue with a distant horizon comes up later when you try to scenic and "blend" it in and have no real middle ground, which creates the need to cover it with buildings and foliage.

Of course, not sure all of that helps...It still does not give you a measurement. I like to keep the horizon low enough (a few inches) that I can cover some of it with the buildings & trees etc.

Craig
Yeah I believe it was the July issue of MR and that was for panoramic horizon/background and a great section in the Jan. issue for scenery techniques related to The MR stafs MR&T layout with tree lined horizon. If you go to MR web page and punch up some info you'll get a hit. I just like saving and paging through these mags. Check out Model Railroad Hobbiest on line mag..they have some cool stuff in there as well. Post some pics and good luck!
 
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