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Hi
The benefits of hydrogen vehicles are innumerable. It will change the future and will make the environment cleaner. One of the best innovation in Hydrogen vehicle is hydrogen fuel cell train(hydrail). The commercial service of Hydrails has been already started in Germany now. Are there any other countries planning to implement Hydrails?
 

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Current production methods
Hydrogen is industrially produced from steam reforming, which uses fossil fuels such as natural gas, oil, or coal. The energy content of the produced hydrogen is less than the energy content of the original fuel, some of it being lost as excessive heat during production. Steam reforming leads to carbon dioxide emissions, in the same way as a car engine would do.

A small part (4% in 2006) is produced by electrolysis using electricity and water, consuming approximately 50 kilowatt-hours of electricity per kilogram of hydrogen produced.
 

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I've studied it a lot at work and personally, and am not so sure. to use it as a fuel and energy source, we would have to produce the hydrogen, and that takes energy. Hydrogen is basically an energy storage medium that would compete with batteries and other clean methods of use in cars and locos, etc. It has some downsides - difficult to package and all. Like anything they can be overcome and managed but the question is how do those costs compare to other alternatives. It is not clear to me or my colleagues that hydrogen offers enough net advantage to prevail.

And personally, since using hydrogen to produce power requires oxidation (in a fuel cell or combustion chamber), I'm not a fan on that basis alone. combustion has exhaust and even though it is clear with hydrogen it is not entirely clean, oxidation in fuel cells has its own exhaust.
 

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Every form of energy that we use has some form of exhaust or residue that needs to be dealt with. Solar requires the manufacture of generating cells, and that leaves residue. Wind requires maintenance of the generators, and that leaves residue. Nuclear leaves waste, which has to be stored/disposed of somewhere. Even hydroelectric requires maintenance (oil changes, etc.), hence residue.

So far carbon-based fuels seem to be the least costly and most practical way to go, but they have serious drawbacks too. No-one has come up with the perfect answer...in fact, I doubt that there is one.
 
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