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I've learned a little about hazmat car placement within a train and if possible I'd like to try to add that element to my operations. Now is the time to consider this since I haven't started building my layout yet.

My layout will not be big enough to model a big plant which would justify a unit train so I'm rather wondering if anyone can suggest a smaller industry that can be modeled which only receives a couple of cars.

I live in the U.S. Northeast and have seen some mixed freights with just two or three tank cars with hazmat placards within them but I have no idea where they're going or where they're coming from. Also I don't know what they carry.

Looking forward to all suggestions and comments. Thanks!

Paul
 

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Paul, I have no suggestions for an industry for your layout, but here's a way for you to identify the loads you see on trains.

Google "haz mat placard" and include the 4-digit number you see on the rail car placard, such as 1249. From the results you'll get, you can choose one...This is the info I got by doing that:
https://cameochemicals.noaa.gov/unna/1249

Notice it includes the chemical name and the manufacturer. You can research that company to maybe find a small one you can model.

Good luck! :smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Paul, I have no suggestions for an industry for your layout, but here's a way for you to identify the loads you see on trains.

Google "haz mat placard" and include the 4-digit number you see on the rail car placard, such as 1249. From the results you'll get, you can choose one...This is the info I got by doing that:
https://cameochemicals.noaa.gov/unna/1249

Notice it includes the chemical name and the manufacturer. You can research that company to maybe find a small one you can model.

Good luck! :smilie_daumenpos:
Great info! Thanks
 

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Fuel dealer/distributor or rail-to-truck chemicals transloading is one of the most obvious choices for a small facility taking a few cars.

Plenty of interesting chemicals are handled to different industries in single car movements.

Unit trains are reserved for the really massive high-volume loads like ethanol and crude oil, from large-scale production facilities to other refineries. Then, finished product is shipped out from the refineries in large volumes, but spread out to various small-to-medium size distribution points all over the place.
 

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When I pulled Hazmat I did a lot of chemical plants where they mixed resins for the wood industry plus others. The plants where just little places tucked away with only enough room for 3 or 4 cars and maybe a hand full of trucks. Here's one that had a single lane that was just wide enough for two trucks to pass and a rail car: https://goo.gl/maps/ZYi2V1wieCi4KJUR7
 

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I've learned a little about hazmat car placement within a train and if possible I'd like to try to add that element to my operations. Now is the time to consider this since I haven't started building my layout yet.

My layout will not be big enough to model a big plant which would justify a unit train so I'm rather wondering if anyone can suggest a smaller industry that can be modeled which only receives a couple of cars.

I live in the U.S. Northeast and have seen some mixed freights with just two or three tank cars with hazmat placards within them but I have no idea where they're going or where they're coming from. Also I don't know what they carry.

Looking forward to all suggestions and comments. Thanks!

Paul
Where in the North East?
I am in New Jersey.

I have been hauling hazmats for a long time.....too long.
Here is a better site to find out what is inside the cars. Or tanker trucks too.
Just write down the number when you see them and put it in the search box.

http://theleif.org/tools/hazmat.php


Now some numbers like 1268 will be classified under Petroleum Distillates.
This number has a bunch of different products in it. Solvents.
But the hazmat response is the same for them.
1993 is another.
1987 takes care of denatured alcohol blends of all kinds, and alcohols.

The color of the placard identifies the hazard also.
Red placards indicate the material is flammable;
Green placards indicate the material is non-flammable;
Yellow placards indicate the material is an oxidizer;
Blue placards indicate the material is dangerous when wet;
White placards indicate the material is an inhalation hazard and/or poison;
Black and white placards indicate the material is corrosive;
Red and white placards indicate the material is a flammable solid or spontaneously combustible (it depends on the color pattern);
White and yellow placards indicate the material is radioactive;
Orange placards indicate the material is explosive;

White placards with black stripes indicate miscellaneous hazardous materials.
(These used to be non-placarded but were found to be a Marine pollutant so an ID was established for them)

Note too, that Canada has some material that is placarded different then the states. But most are the same.

EDIT,
WHAT TOWN IN MASSACHUSETTS?
I USED TO DELIVER ALL OVER MA.
I MIGHT BE ABLE TO TELL YOU A PLACE AROUND YOU TO CHECK OUT.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When I pulled Hazmat I did a lot of chemical plants where they mixed resins for the wood industry plus others. The plants where just little places tucked away with only enough room for 3 or 4 cars and maybe a hand full of trucks. Here's one that had a single lane that was just wide enough for two trucks to pass and a rail car: https://goo.gl/maps/ZYi2V1wieCi4KJUR7
Thanks, Chaos! Something like that might work well on my layout.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Where in the North East?
I am in New Jersey.

I have been hauling hazmats for a long time.....too long.
Here is a better site to find out what is inside the cars. Or tanker trucks too.
Just write down the number when you see them and put it in the search box.

http://theleif.org/tools/hazmat.php


Now some numbers like 1268 will be classified under Petroleum Distillates.
This number has a bunch of different products in it. Solvents.
But the hazmat response is the same for them.
1993 is another.
1987 takes care of denatured alcohol blends of all kinds, and alcohols.

The color of the placard identifies the hazard also.
Red placards indicate the material is flammable;
Green placards indicate the material is non-flammable;
Yellow placards indicate the material is an oxidizer;
Blue placards indicate the material is dangerous when wet;
White placards indicate the material is an inhalation hazard and/or poison;
Black and white placards indicate the material is corrosive;
Red and white placards indicate the material is a flammable solid or spontaneously combustible (it depends on the color pattern);
White and yellow placards indicate the material is radioactive;
Orange placards indicate the material is explosive;

White placards with black stripes indicate miscellaneous hazardous materials.
(These used to be non-placarded but were found to be a Marine pollutant so an ID was established for them)

Note too, that Canada has some material that is placarded different then the states. But most are the same.

EDIT,
WHAT TOWN IN MASSACHUSETTS?
I USED TO DELIVER ALL OVER MA.
I MIGHT BE ABLE TO TELL YOU A PLACE AROUND YOU TO CHECK OUT.
Thanks for the link, Big Ed!

I'm just south of Boston on the South Shore. If you have any ideas about where I could do some rail fanning that would be great!
 
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