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Hello, I'm Doug from Batesburg SC. I'm jumping back in after a 40 year hiatus. A lot has changed! I have started with a Bachmann dcc e-z command controller and atlas code 83 ho track. I have a Bachmann Berkshire, a Norfolk and Western J2 streamliner, a Bachmann Alco Mogul, and a couple of older DC analog locomotives. I have not built a layout yet, but I'm getting everything together.

Doug;

Welcome to the forum!

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Hello from Spain

I see you have a great community here!

I love trains and I would like to see your model trains, so I can plan where to introduce myself into this world!
 

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Hello from Spain

I see you have a great community here!

I love trains and I would like to see your model trains, so I can plan where to introduce myself into this world!
watusi;

Welcome to the forum! If you search the "model train videos" and "My layout" sections of this forum you should find lots of photos of model trains.
The files below should also give you a lot of information about this hobby.

Again, welcome;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Good Morning. This is a first post and an Introduction. I'm Scott from Palm Beach Gardens, Fl. I had my first set of Lionel on a reversed ping pong table when I was 9. Since then I built an N scale layout (10 yrs worth) and an O Scale layout (another ten years of work) and now, finally, I am working in HO where I should have started. I have a shed which is air conditioned and 15 x 10, so I went with "around the walls" with a duck under. I have three levels, all connected, with three yards, a turntable, roundhouse and I am currently working on structures. I fell in love wiht building wooden craftsman kits - usually old west. I have learned the proper techniques watched Jason Jensen and FOS videos on their sites as well as on Youtube. I am going to attend the Asheville Train SHow at the end of Feb my first show. Looking for kits and ideas. I have purchased from Carolina Craftsman, Bar Mills, FOS, GC, Right on Track etc. Really having fun with the building and weathering am getting pretty darn good.

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I'm working on a Wild West Street scene. I will build a few more structures and then start the road and elevation work. Always looking for ideas thanks
 

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Good Morning. This is a first post and an Introduction. I'm Scott from Palm Beach Gardens, Fl. I had my first set of Lionel on a reversed ping pong table when I was 9. Since then I built an N scale layout (10 yrs worth) and an O Scale layout (another ten years of work) and now, finally, I am working in HO where I should have started. I have a shed which is air conditioned and 15 x 10, so I went with "around the walls" with a duck under. I have three levels, all connected, with three yards, a turntable, roundhouse and I am currently working on structures. I fell in love wiht building wooden craftsman kits - usually old west. I have learned the proper techniques watched Jason Jensen and FOS videos on their sites as well as on Youtube. I am going to attend the Asheville Train SHow at the end of Feb my first show. Looking for kits and ideas. I have purchased from Carolina Craftsman, Bar Mills, FOS, GC, Right on Track etc. Really having fun with the building and weathering am getting pretty darn good.

View attachment 554538 View attachment 554539

I'm working on a Wild West Street scene. I will build a few more structures and then start the road and elevation work. Always looking for ideas thanks
Scud312;

Welcome to the forum! your layout and structures look very good! Beautiful Work! (y) I'm building a two-level N-scale layout set in the Seattle, Washington area. How do your trains get from one level to another? I use a "stretched helix." My whole mainline is a continuous grade. I also like scratchbuilding structures. The photos show a few.

again welcome;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Welcome. Your modeling is to be amired. Really nice work!

How about an OK Corral scene for an old west idea?
 

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Scud312;

Welcome to the forum! your layout and structures look very good! Beautiful Work! (y) I'm building a two-level N-scale layout set in the Seattle, Washington area. How do your trains get from one level to another? I use a "stretched helix." My whole mainline is a continuous grade. I also like scratchbuilding structures. The photos show a few.

again welcome;

Traction Fan 🙂
Just beautiful work! N is a hard scale to work in - I did it for 10 years and never got around to the structures. I loved the track work and the plaster as in N a little elevation is a whole lot. Unfortunately we sold the house where I built the layout in the attic and there was no way to get it out. I used open grid construction and it was a ton of woodworking.
 

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Welcome. Your modeling is to be amired. Really nice work!

How about an OK Corral scene for an old west idea?
That is a GREAT idea! Going to work on it today. I haver a church coming in for the end of the street. I built Wicked Wanda's from Bar Mills and populated it with tiny hookers. Then my buddy bought me a DWCC steam loco and when I saw how great it looked I decided to build a wild west town. I have watched a bunch of vids on how to build a proper dirst street for my town. Especially great were Doug Fos' videos
 

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Just beautiful work! N is a hard scale to work in - I did it for 10 years and never got around to the structures. I loved the track work and the plaster as in N a little elevation is a whole lot. Unfortunately we sold the house where I built the layout in the attic and there was no way to get it out. I used open grid construction and it was a ton of woodworking.
scud312;

Thanks for the compliment! Coming from someone with your level of talent, it's especially welcome. I went from 0-27 tinplate to HO and finally to N-scale where I have been for forty years. After getting over the initial "gosh this is tiny" stage, I've never found N-scale hard to work in. It takes patience, and practice, but that's equally true in other scales and other hobbies. I'm 72 now and partially disabled, but I still get along just fine in N-scale. To each his own, and your scratchbuilt structures would be excellent in any scale! If you're going to the wild west era, you might need to backdate a few of the signs on the structures, but the buildings themselves will fit right in. I'm planning to leave some signs, autos, and possibly figures, replaceable, since I want to model two eras, the 1920s & 1950s. The electric locomotives are what drew me into modeling the Milwaukee Road. Seattle had four major railroads UP, GN, NP, and Milw. all in a tiny area, so that became my focus. My centerpiece structure is Seattle Union Station. I once hosted the Union Pacific, and Milwaukee Road passenger service to Seattle. Across the street was King St. station which was the terminal for the Northern Pacific, and Great Northern. Those four had some gorgeous passenger trains in the 1950s, but I also like the earlier, pre-diesel, era with steam unchallenged by anything but the electrics. The 1920s after "The great war" and before "the great depression" appealed to me. America was at peace, isolated, naïve, and optimistic then. We could use some of that today.

Keep up the good work;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Hi all. I'm Wes. My 12 yo son and I have just started our first build. It is a Bachmann N-scale. We will have approximately 28' of track with a couple of bridges and a tunnel. We are not doing a specific area or time period. The train is the Yard Boss set. We are just going to have fun with it. I used SCARM to design the layout. We are building on a 4'x8' table (I know) but we are space limited as it will be in his room. Right now I'm having a hard time with my grade as we went with a 4% to get the height. Looking more closely we could have gotten the same height with a lesser grade. I believe I have a solution though. We have been busy building custom trees and a few other scenery items while also working on the layout.

I look forward to finding great tips and making some friends.

Regards.
 

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Hi all. I'm Wes. My 12 yo son and I have just started our first build. It is a Bachmann N-scale. We will have approximately 28' of track with a couple of bridges and a tunnel. We are not doing a specific area or time period. The train is the Yard Boss set. We are just going to have fun with it. I used SCARM to design the layout. We are building on a 4'x8' table (I know) but we are space limited as it will be in his room. Right now I'm having a hard time with my grade as we went with a 4% to get the height. Looking more closely we could have gotten the same height with a lesser grade. I believe I have a solution though. We have been busy building custom trees and a few other scenery items while also working on the layout.

I look forward to finding great tips and making some friends.

Regards.

Wes & son;
Welcome, both of you, to the forum!

Model railroading is a great hobby to share between parents & kids. You, and your son, will have a great time. How are you building your trees? What material are you using? You're right that 4% is a very steep grade. One trick you can use is to split the grade into two grades, one going up, and the other down. That way you can get the same separation at the bridge where they cross, as you would using one steeper grade. Another thing that is important when building a grade, is to consider the effect of curves and grades. Many model railroad grades are composed largely of curved track. Just like grades, curves resist the movement of a train, due to the friction on the wheels when passing through a curve. It is also helpful and important, to use "vertical easements" (stretches of milder grade) at the bottom, and top, of the grade. These help ease the train's transition from level track to climbing a grade. They also prevent things like unplanned uncoupling of cars, and having the front coupler snag on the ties when the locomotive comes off the bottom of a grade. Curves should also have easements. In this case, a wider radius curve is added to both ends of a tighter curve to ease the transition from straight track and into the curve.

My own N-scale layout is a two-level shelf layout. The trains need to climb 16" between levels. To do this, I have my entire mainline at a 2% grade. The railroad is mounted to the walls of my garage, and trains travel across the garage twice to make the climb. You can see a diagram of my railroad in the "Layout Design" section of this forum. It is at the end of a thread called, 'Here are the layouts of some forum members."
A shelf layout would fit nicely into a bedroom, and it wouldn't take up as much of that room as a 4' x 8' layout does.

Most Bachmann train sets come with Bachman EZ-Track in them. That track is OK, but the Bachmann EZ-Track turnouts (track switches) have a lousy reputation for derailments, and not holding up well. It is possible to adapt EZ-Track to mate with flex track or sectional track. Doing that will let you use your existing track, and get into using better quality track and especially better turnouts. Peco is a very good brand of turnout. Rugged and reliable, they seldom, if ever, cause any derailments.

There is a good book available for new model railroaders like you two guys. It's called "Getting Started in Model Railroading" by Jeff Wilson. It covers a wide variety of model railroad topics in simple text, and many photos. You can order a copy from www.amazon.com
The files below are some that I wrote for new modelers. They have lots of information in them, some of which will help now, and other parts may wait until later. Look through them at your own pace, if you like.

Good Luck & have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Sorry for the slow reply! Busy weekend. Thanks for the advice. We currently do not have any turnouts but probably will in the future. I've not had the chance to see if my idea is going to help with our grade issue but I will soon. My son is most interested in the scenery aspect so that is why we went with the 4x8 layout.

Yes our set is an EZ track system. I've noted that I will have to "tighten" some of the couplers to make sure we prevent shorts.

Thank you for all of the PDF's to look at. I am about to start right now! I will also look at the other layouts. I'm always amazed at the incredible scenes that people make. For us we have always been drawn to the "micro scale" because of the ability to add more in less space and we both think it's really "cool"!

My wife bought some of the "cheapo" trees via Amazon, but we built a bunch of wire armature trees. I've watched several tutorials but one guy that I REALLY like is Luke Towhend from Boulder Creek Railroad. If you're not familiar with him, he is an Aussie that does dioramas but also does model railroading. The guy is pretty sharp! As soon as I figure out how to add photos I'll post what we've built tree wise.

Thanks again,

Wes
 

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Sorry for the slow reply! Busy weekend. Thanks for the advice. We currently do not have any turnouts but probably will in the future. I've not had the chance to see if my idea is going to help with our grade issue but I will soon. My son is most interested in the scenery aspect so that is why we went with the 4x8 layout.

Yes our set is an EZ track system. I've noted that I will have to "tighten" some of the couplers to make sure we prevent shorts.

Thank you for all of the PDF's to look at. I am about to start right now! I will also look at the other layouts. I'm always amazed at the incredible scenes that people make. For us we have always been drawn to the "micro scale" because of the ability to add more in less space and we both think it's really "cool"!

My wife bought some of the "cheapo" trees via Amazon, but we built a bunch of wire armature trees. I've watched several tutorials but one guy that I REALLY like is Luke Towhend from Boulder Creek Railroad. If you're not familiar with him, he is an Aussie that does dioramas but also does model railroading. The guy is pretty sharp! As soon as I figure out how to add photos I'll post what we've built tree wise.

Thanks again,

Wes

Wes;

No need to apologize. This forum comes under the heading of "What to do in your spare time." If you don't have any spare time, then you reply whenever you can. Nobody here is punching a clock. To attach photos to your posts, you just need to have sent 5 or more posts to the forum. Directions for attaching photos are in the "Forum News Updates & Help" section, right at the beginning. The files I sent you are packed with a lot of information, and as I said last time, a lot of it may not apply to what you're doing now. Just enjoy what you have and add information and progress at your own pace. One of the dumbest things one can do in a hobby is trying to go to fast, or set deadlines for yourself. That turns recreation into work. :p

I'm sending a few photos from my own model railroad. My conifer trees were made with the method in one of the files. Your trees look good, but as you go along try for a more "open" look. Less foliage, more branches and air gaps between them. If you look at a real tree you can normally see through the leafy branches a bit. Doing the same on a model tree makes it look more like a real one. If you look at the trees in my photos, I think you'll see what I mean. Start with the photo with the big steel trestle. Look at the trees under the trestle. They are some of my early efforts and they look very solid and opaque. Then look at the second last photo labeled "Trees closer yet ." Those trees look better don't they? The trick is that you can see open areas between branches.

Keep Having Fun Together;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Thanks! I actually wanted these to be denser as we live on the MS Gulf Coast. Our two dominant tree species are the live oak (Quercus virginiana ) and the longleaf (aka yellow) pine (Pinus palustris) so we wanted to mimic them as best as possible. I will definitely open them up more with other species.

I read your tutorial on the conifers--great idea and usage of common materials!
 

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Good day everyone, first time on this forum and can’t wait to get some ideas and info from you all out there.
I have a question.... I am restarting HO scale modelling after nearly 20 year break from it, I would like to know people’s feelings and input into what brand track is the best value for money for a amateurish modeller.

thanks in advance

charlie
 
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