Model Train Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello..

I am simply wondering are there any vertical manual switch throwers? This switch is too close to too my fascia have a horizontal or "typical" throw mechanism. Im wondering if there's anything similar to the I believe older style of prototypical throw that I could place in this location?

Im pretty sure im going to need to shorten the arm either way, but I'm just wondering if anyone has any suggestions? Im open to any suggestions.

I know Walthers has horizontal machines, much like the vertical ones I already use, I just don't think it will fit in there under the layout..

Thanks in advance...


Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
move the point throw arm to the other side, and you will have plenty of room ???
Thanks for the response..

Unfortunately, no because there's another track next to that one(it just cannot be seen in the picture)..

Thanks again.. Appreciated. Im all ears for any other suggestions you can come up with..



Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,538 Posts
You could use a bell crank under the layout to place a switch machine in an offset location.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,778 Posts
I won't use switch machines. I am cheap and would rather line my turnouts for a route by hand.

So, I use 1/4" or slightly thicker wooden dowels to move the lower end of a crank. The crank is screwed lightly, but fairly snuggly, to the side of a wooden block, often a chunk of 2X4, which is itself screwed up to the underside of the deck or to the side of a joist/spacer/riser if they are close by.

The dowel is attached to near the bottom end of the crank, which I craft out of strips of wood.

Before placing the crank against the block, I drill a small hole in the top end and insert a sharpened brad or whatever that can be shoved deep into the tiny hole and epoxied. The sharpened brad/finishing nail's tip goes up into the throwbar's hole between the points rails.

So, with the block properly fixed in place, you now have to go under the deck and insert the sharpened tip into the hole through a pre-drilled hole under the throwbar (is it too late for that?). With that tip inserted, but not forcing the throwbar up or breaking it, and just it's tip showing, you mark where the mounting screw of the crank will be. Then, you drill both the crank and block, and then drive a suitable screw through both with the crank's sharp nail up into the throwbar again. It's tricky, yes, but you get better at it.

With a small hole sensibly placed in the fascia plate, you thread the dowel over to the crank, get them connected somehow, and there is your actuator. Each time I construct one of these, it takes maybe 20 minutes or so.

Where the dowel protrudes through the fascia, and you don't need more than about 5/8" with the dowel driven toward the fascia and the points in the closest position, you can paint bands around the dowel's end to suggest which way the points are thrown if they're further back and hard to see, or under rolling stock and hidden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
You could use a bell crank under the layout to place a switch machine in an offset location.
Im interested in this bell crank idea. Do you have any visuals to illustrate?

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I won't use switch machines. I am cheap and would rather line my turnouts for a route by hand.



So, I use 1/4" or slightly thicker wooden dowels to move the lower end of a crank. The crank is screwed lightly, but fairly snuggly, to the side of a wooden block, often a chunk of 2X4, which is itself screwed up to the underside of the deck or to the side of a joist/spacer/riser if they are close by.



The dowel is attached to near the bottom end of the crank, which I craft out of strips of wood.



Before placing the crank against the block, I drill a small hole in the top end and insert a sharpened brad or whatever that can be shoved deep into the tiny hole and epoxied. The sharpened brad/finishing nail's tip goes up into the throwbar's hole between the points rails.



So, with the block properly fixed in place, you now have to go under the deck and insert the sharpened tip into the hole through a pre-drilled hole under the throwbar (is it too late for that?). With that tip inserted, but not forcing the throwbar up or breaking it, and just it's tip showing, you mark where the mounting screw of the crank will be. Then, you drill both the crank and block, and then drive a suitable screw through both with the crank's sharp nail up into the throwbar again. It's tricky, yes, but you get better at it.



With a small hole sensibly placed in the fascia plate, you thread the dowel over to the crank, get them connected somehow, and there is your actuator. Each time I construct one of these, it takes maybe 20 minutes or so.



Where the dowel protrudes through the fascia, and you don't need more than about 5/8" with the dowel driven toward the fascia and the points in the closest position, you can paint bands around the dowel's end to suggest which way the points are thrown if they're further back and hard to see, or under rolling stock and hidden.
I believe the bellcrank idea is what I wish to experiment with. I have watched many videos of layouts that had little knobs, where switches are located. I had sort of an idea, but simply couldn't and cannot vision in my mind how exactly it would look, or be installed. Do you have, or know of any pictures of this mechanism?



Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Im interested in this bell crank idea. Do you have any visuals to illustrate?

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
We did something similar with a O-72 turnout, it was more complicated!
And you have virtually no clearance for a train.
I think under layout would work out better.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,090 Posts
I don't remember the manufacturer's name, but I had many of these when I mounted NJI switch machines under the platform. If someone knows the name, I suspect they can be had on ebay.

IMG_4691.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
I do not know if a Caboose Industries Ground throw (Rigid) would work there or not. It looks like it is a little close to the edge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,538 Posts
I don't have any pictures of a bell crank of my own, no. The Wikipedia article does s good job of illustrating and describing the concept. Dozens of YouTube videos out there too.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellcrank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,846 Posts
Linkage manufacturer

I don't remember the manufacturer's name, but I had many of these when I mounted NJI switch machines under the platform. If someone knows the name, I suspect they can be had on ebay.

View attachment 522672
Lehigh74;

I believe they are called, Earl Eshelman linkages.

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,846 Posts
Bell crank linkage

Im interested in this bell crank idea. Do you have any visuals to illustrate?

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
MatroxD;

The first three photos show the basic idea. Not, strictly speaking, a bell crank, but it is an old and reliable linkage. The linkage is attached to my "$5 switch machine." pushing, or pulling the green knob just outside the fascia moves the green linkage and throws the points of the turnout
The last photo does have actual bell cranks in it.* However, they are far enough back that you can't see them unless you click on the photo a few times to enlarge it, The motors closer to the camera operate turnouts through a simpler version of push/pull linkage. The motor rotates a lever that does the pushing or pulling of a horizontal rod that runs back to a spot directly below a turnout and operates a linkage similar to the one shown in the first three photos.

A bell crank is a triangular, 'T', or 'L'-shaped piece of metal that can change the direction of mechanical motion 90 degrees. 'T' shaped bell cranks were used in old fashioned control line flying model airplanes to operate the elevators. I suspect the name "bell crank" may come from the way church bells are rung. Pulling a vertical rope pulls a lever that is fastened to a shaft which, in turn is attached to the bell. Pull the rope vertically, the lever is pulled down, which rotates the horizontal shaft and bell.

*In my last photo, the double stacked motors each drive a screw which pulls/pushes one leg of an L-shaped bell crank which, in turn, pulls, or pushes, a horizontal rod linkage that opens, or closes, a pair of doors on the model engine house above those motors.

regards;

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:

switch machine green points.JPG

switch machine green linkage.JPG

switch machine green bottom view.JPG

Cedar Falls motors & linkages.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,090 Posts
You are right. Earl R. Eshelman Turnout Switch Point Link. And there are 2 of them on Ebay. I’m pretty sure it would work for what the OP wants to do. I’m guessing the different sizes are for length. I used size 2 and the ones on ebay are size 1 and size 3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Sorry for just responding guys. Been under the back and forth weather and working time has been pretty insane. I thank everyone for suggestions. I will try and go through, asking questions as I go and need to, this weekend..

Thanks much again..

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top