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I was checking a couple trains I had fixed the other night on my layout. I didn’t have any luck, even with a new train I used. I’ve soldered my layout and cleaned the track. I connected the wires from the terminal track to the transformer. I took apart the transformer for my brothers train. I remember other members telling me to be wary of using old power supplies, so I was curious about its condition & pried off the control knob with a pair of scissors, hoping it would separate from the housing but it didn’t work.I know I’m not the only person who’s had difficulties in the past. I think I’ll buy everything new and stop working with older trains.
Thanks
 

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I wasn't really thinking of dcc until you mentioned it. I think I was more concerned with things working properly. I also thought of having a hobby shop in Calgary build a layout for me so I wont have to mess around & deal with track problems etc, but it takes away the fun of building a layout with your hands too.
 

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I also thought of having a hobby shop in Calgary build a layout for me so I wont have to mess around & deal with track problems etc, but it takes away the fun of building a layout with your hands too.
If you have them do the layout only through the track laying stage there will still plenty for you to do.
 

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Hi D&J.
The power supply in the photo is from my brother's Fleischmann train set, & my brother was born in Germany in the 1960's. I think the train set originally came out in the mid 50's though.
 

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I've tried repairing the Fleischmann transformer that came with my brother's set, but I haven't had any luck so I decided to browse Ebay. I feel I owe it to my brother to get a replacement power supply. I emailed a guy in Germany about the Fleischmann transformer he's selling, to find out if its 220v or 110v as his ad doesn't have a photo of power specs. I haven't heard back from him yet, but I might splurge & buy it with the Visa card I have, yet I'm only supposed to use it for "Non model railroad items." My birthday is at the end of the month too. I've been looking at other transformers of a lower voltage by Fleischmann, along with other model train items. The next time I take a transformer apart to inspect it, I'll take the bottom off first that way all the bells & whistles will be intact.

Happy Thanksgiving Too
 

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I've tried repairing the Fleischmann transformer that came with my brother's set, but I haven't had any luck so I decided to browse Ebay. I feel I owe it to my brother to get a replacement power supply. I emailed a guy in Germany about the Fleischmann transformer he's selling, to find out if its 220v or 110v as his ad doesn't have a photo of power specs. I haven't heard back from him yet, but I might splurge & buy it with the Visa card I have, yet I'm only supposed to use it for "Non model railroad items." My birthday is at the end of the month too. I've been looking at other transformers of a lower voltage by Fleischmann, along with other model train items. The next time I take a transformer apart to inspect it, I'll take the bottom off first that way all the bells & whistles will be intact.

Happy Thanksgiving Too
MrStucky;

The transformer in your photo looks like one of many electric devices that was not designed to be taken apart. If the bottom unscrews, that's fine, but if it doesn't, you may have to cut the thing to get it open. I've done that with some battery chargers and other devices, and it's not easy. I recommend you determine what type of power, and voltage, your brother's train is supposed to run on, and buy a transformer that fits that bill. If the train runs on DC power, you can test it with a 9-volt battery across the wheels of the locomotive, using a 9-volt battery clip that has wires attached, or just a plain piece of wire to reach the far wheel with one of the battery terminals on one wheel. If that works, what you need isn't, technically a "transformer" but rather a DC "power pack" which has both a transformer, and a rectifier, inside it. These are very common, and used ones are available cheap. Model Rectifier Corp. (MRC) is one excellent brand. If your brother's train runs on AC power, the track it runs on will probably have a third rail, or a series of metal studs, down the center of the ties. The type of power, and voltage output, may be labeled on the broken transformer you have now. And yes, AC powered trains do actually run on transformers rather than power packs.

Good Luck

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter #9
MrStucky;

The transformer in your photo looks like one of many electric devices that was not designed to be taken apart. If the bottom unscrews, that's fine, but if it doesn't, you may have to cut the thing to get it open. I've done that with some battery chargers and other devices, and it's not easy. I recommend you determine what type of power, and voltage, your brother's train is supposed to run on, and buy a transformer that fits that bill. If the train runs on DC power, you can test it with a 9-volt battery across the wheels of the locomotive, using a 9-volt battery clip that has wires attached, or just a plain piece of wire to reach the far wheel with one of the battery terminals on one wheel. If that works, what you need isn't, technically a "transformer" but rather a DC "power pack" which has both a transformer, and a rectifier, inside it. These are very common, and used ones are available cheap. Model Rectifier Corp. (MRC) is one excellent brand. If your brother's train runs on AC power, the track it runs on will probably have a third rail, or a series of metal studs, down the center of the ties. The type of power, and voltage output, may be labeled on the broken transformer you have now. And yes, AC powered trains do actually run on transformers rather than power packs.

Good Luck

Traction Fan 🙂
[
MrStucky;

The transformer in your photo looks like one of many electric devices that was not designed to be taken apart. If the bottom unscrews, that's fine, but if it doesn't, you may have to cut the thing to get it open. I've done that with some battery chargers and other devices, and it's not easy. I recommend you determine what type of power, and voltage, your brother's train is supposed to run on, and buy a transformer that fits that bill. If the train runs on DC power, you can test it with a 9-volt battery across the wheels of the locomotive, using a 9-volt battery clip that has wires attached, or just a plain piece of wire to reach the far wheel with one of the battery terminals on one wheel. If that works, what you need isn't, technically a "transformer" but rather a DC "power pack" which has both a transformer, and a rectifier, inside it. These are very common, and used ones are available cheap. Model Rectifier Corp. (MRC) is one excellent brand. If your brother's train runs on AC power, the track it runs on will probably have a third rail, or a series of metal studs, down the center of the ties. The type of power, and voltage output, may be labeled on the broken transformer you have now. And yes, AC powered trains do actually run on transformers rather than power packs.

Good Luck

Traction Fan 🙂
Hi Traction Fan. I meant to reply earlier to your response except I had an upcoming online appointment. My brother's 0-6-0 operates on DC on two rails & the power requirements of the broken transformer are 110v 50-60Hz 13VA. The transformer in the photo is similar to the one I broke, & I drilled out the rivets at each corner after I had taken it apart from the top. I ordered a replacement transformer on Ebay & it'll arrive this month, until then I have an MRC 1370 power pack to run trains with. I noticed DCC systems on Ebay, except I'd prefer to buy DCC brand new in case something fails. I'd get alot more railroad stuff from Ebay, but then I'll need to find some elves to help me with all the repairs. Thanks s-l1600.jpg
550174

MrStucky;

The transformer in your photo looks like one of many electric devices that was not designed to be taken apart. If the bottom unscrews, that's fine, but if it doesn't, you may have to cut the thing to get it open. I've done that with some battery chargers and other devices, and it's not easy. I recommend you determine what type of power, and voltage, your brother's train is supposed to run on, and buy a transformer that fits that bill. If the train runs on DC power, you can test it with a 9-volt battery across the wheels of the locomotive, using a 9-volt battery clip that has wires attached, or just a plain piece of wire to reach the far wheel with one of the battery terminals on one wheel. If that works, what you need isn't, technically a "transformer" but rather a DC "power pack" which has both a transformer, and a rectifier, inside it. These are very common, and used ones are available cheap. Model Rectifier Corp. (MRC) is one excellent brand. If your brother's train runs on AC power, the track it runs on will probably have a third rail, or a series of metal studs, down the center of the ties. The type of power, and voltage output, may be labeled on the broken transformer you have now. And yes, AC powered trains do actually run on transformers rather than power packs.

Good Luck

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Hi Traction Fan. I meant to reply earlier to your response except I had an upcoming online appointment. My brother's 0-6-0 operates on DC on two rails & the power requirements of the broken transformer are 110v 50-60Hz 13VA. The transformer in the photo is similar to the one I broke, & I drilled out the rivets at each corner after I had taken it apart from the top. I ordered a replacement transformer on Ebay & it'll arrive this month, until then I have an MRC 1370 power pack to run trains with. I noticed DCC systems on Ebay, except I'd prefer to buy DCC brand new in case something fails. I'd get alot more railroad stuff from Ebay, but then I'll need to find some elves to help me with all the repairs. Thanks View attachment 550174 View attachment 550174
Mr.Stucky;

I think you are wise to buy your DCC system new. They can be a little confusing at first, simply because they are different from traditional DC, and have a lot more options & variables, and it's nice to have backup from the manufacturer. Once you learn how they work, & get them programed, DCC systems are quite easy to use. They also do away with 90% of the train control wiring of a typical DC layout set up for running two or more trains. I use, and recommend the NCE Powercab system. Its ridiculously simple to connect (two wires) simple to program, and simple to use. The entire DCC system is in one small hand-held unit. Digitrax, MRC Prodigy, and Bachmann, also offer DCC systems. Personally I suggest avoiding the Bachmann, and going with any of the first three brands you like. All are good quality, full-featured systems.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂

Traction Fan
 
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