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There are probably several reasons. Much of the U.S. isn't dense enough or concentrated enough to support extensive door to door rail travel. In additional, our destinations aren't set up for extensive supplemental transportation upon arrival. And above all, we love our cars and the independence they give us.

In addition to the East Coast, there are efforts being made in California to get Hi-speed rail travel between LA and SF. It's proving to be a challenge economically.
 

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There are probably several reasons. Much of the U.S. isn't dense enough or concentrated enough to support extensive door to door rail travel. In additional, our destinations aren't set up for extensive supplemental transportation upon arrival. And above all, we love our cars and the independence they give us.

In addition to the East Coast, there are efforts being made in California to get Hi-speed rail travel between LA and SF. It's proving to be a challenge economically.
Still no excuse in my opinion. I live in Utah and my wife has taken Amtrak from Salt Lake to Sacramento and back many times. Bad service and poor schedule. I want to take Amtrak from SLC to Charleston SC to visit our son but it is very expensive with a sleeper and one has to change trains in Chicago in the middle of the night and again in DC.
I believe that much more can be done to improve US domestic rail service despite the legitimate reasons you cite.:smilie_daumenneg: Canada has a great transcontinental rail service in the sparsely populated west. :appl:
 

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No question, Amtrak simply goes through the motions of providing rail service. No attempt is made to make it a desirable form of transportation.
 

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Still no excuse in my opinion. I live in Utah and my wife has taken Amtrak from Salt Lake to Sacramento and back many times. Bad service and poor schedule. I want to take Amtrak from SLC to Charleston SC to visit our son but it is very expensive with a sleeper and one has to change trains in Chicago in the middle of the night and again in DC.
I believe that much more can be done to improve US domestic rail service despite the legitimate reasons you cite.:smilie_daumenneg: Canada has a great transcontinental rail service in the sparsely populated west. :appl:
Well, you are comparing apples to oranges IMO.

First off, yes, there certainly could be major improvements in rail service, no argument there.

Consider the population density of Canada vs. the US, it's a 10:1 difference. It's easy to say that we should improve rail service, but who's to pay the hundreds of billions of dollars that it would take to match the systems in other countries?
 

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Well, you are comparing apples to oranges IMO.

First off, yes, there certainly could be major improvements in rail service, no argument there.

Consider the population density of Canada vs. the US, it's a 10:1 difference. It's easy to say that we should improve rail service, but who's to pay the hundreds of billions of dollars that it would take to match the systems in other countries?
I don't mean to compare only to lament what we lost in our rail service.:smilie_daumenneg:
Anyway, all this has distracted from one of the best rail cultures in the world. My first experience with Japanese rail service was in 1957. As a 15 year old, by myself, exploring post war Japan I rode the train to Yokohama. After getting off and looking around the city I went back to the station. BUT, I did not read kanji and the signs were not in English. Few people spoke English and I began to panic and feel quite lost and alone. Eventually someone placed me on the right train to return. Happy I was!
Japanese rail, despite the damage from the war, was fairly good then and exceptionally good now. For many reasons that can be attributed to Japan and Japanese culture. Sorry for the rant and diversion. The video is worth watching in my opinion.:thumbsup:
 

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A few years ago, I was riding the trains in Germany, you can set your watch by the train timetable! When they said the train was going to be there at 8:01, that sucker was there! I was suitably impressed with the precision of the RR.
 

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Well yes, Japan has been a leader in rail travel for several decades now. I first rode the New Tokaido Line (Bullet Train) from Tokyo to Kyoto back in 1973. I remember building a house of playing cards on the tray table in front of me at 160 mph, flying past Mt. Fuji, and it stood. The ride was that smooth. But it's a dedicated electric railway only for bullet trains, similar to the passenger trains in Europe.

In the U.S., the diesel-electric Amtrak trains travel thousands of miles over railways owned by freight railroads, except for the Acela in the Northeast. So there is quite a difference.

We're also a big country from sea to shining sea, where the four densely-populated islands of Japan could fit into the state of California.

Airlines and cars have taken over the continental U.S., with passenger railroads (Amtrak) a distant third.
 

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Japan rail service

Well yes, Japan has been a leader in rail travel for several decades now. I first rode the New Tokaido Line (Bullet Train) from Tokyo to Kyoto back in 1973. I remember building a house of playing cards on the tray table in front of me at 160 mph, flying past Mt. Fuji, and it stood. The ride was that smooth. But it's a dedicated electric railway only for bullet trains, similar to the passenger trains in Europe.

In the U.S., the diesel-electric Amtrak trains travel thousands of miles over railways owned by freight railroads, except for the Acela in the Northeast. So there is quite a difference.

We're also a big country from sea to shining sea, where the four densely-populated islands of Japan could fit into the state of California.

Airlines and cars have taken over the continental U.S., with passenger railroads (Amtrak) a distant third.

You're right, rail travel in Japan is second to none. And that's not just the JR Shinkansen trains. There's a patchwork of national and private railways that make the customer feel like s/he is getting something special. Customer Service also amazing. A first-class classy operation no matter what train you get on.

:appl:
 

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It's true, it takes massive investment to produce a really good efficient rail system, and of course political will. In the UK High Speed 2 or HS2 will link London Birmingham Manchester and Leeds. Cost is estimated to be $60bn. There has been huge opposition but it will happen.
As GRJ says the German network is fantastic, fast and efficient. As the minute hand turns to the allotted time the train is pulling into the station. I once travelled to Hanover via Eurostar, going down through Belgium where they changed locos in the middle of the night hardly waking us in the sleeper. All this costs and in the UK fares have constantly risen by more than inflation.
 

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Still no excuse in my opinion. I live in Utah and my wife has taken Amtrak from Salt Lake to Sacramento and back many times. Bad service and poor schedule. I want to take Amtrak from SLC to Charleston SC to visit our son but it is very expensive with a sleeper and one has to change trains in Chicago in the middle of the night and again in DC.
I believe that much more can be done to improve US domestic rail service despite the legitimate reasons you cite.:smilie_daumenneg: Canada has a great transcontinental rail service in the sparsely populated west. :appl:
I'm not sure I would say "Canada has a great transcontinental rail service in the sparsely populated west." It is a nice scenic drive but aside from major centres service is spotty.

Like Germany, VIA also runs to the minute - departures at least :) There is decent service in the Quebec City - Windsor corridor; we often took the Toronto-Montreal train. And yes, you could set your watches to VIA leaving on time. Arriving ontime - not so much.
 
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