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Discussion Starter #1
Hi
I have Kadee couplers one my switch engines and all cars, I find it hard for some reason to uncouple using a skewer lately, and it used to work great. The couples seem to match up pretty much.
Any suggestions. And where is the best place online to buy Kadees, I live to far from hobby shop.
Bil
 

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I never got the knack of using a skewer. I simply lift one end of a car straight up about 3/8" and move it back. If you are gentle, the truck wheels will stay straight and go right back on the rails.

I tend to buy Kadee couplers right from Kadee. Almost as cheap as ebay and ships right away.
 

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Does your skewer have a filed flat end? It's tiny but
the 'blade' seems to open the couplers better.

Don
 

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It always helps to add some dry graphite to them when they start actong up. Some really fine moving parts in there.
 

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You might consider trying a RIX uncoupling tool.
Only a few dollars, and works quite well.
I use the RIX tool. Never used a skewer but from the videos I've seen no matter how gentle one is it looks like more force on the couplers than necessary.

BTW, all Kadee whiskers or Protomax
 

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I also use the 'lift-n-seperate' method.
I'm just too lazy to install magnetic uncouplers.
 

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I use the RIX tool. Never used a skewer but from the videos I've seen no matter how gentle one is it looks like more force on the couplers than necessary.

BTW, all Kadee whiskers or Protomax
I have a Rix and several homemade skewer tools. I definitely think the skewers work better in all respects. There is almost no force involved (insert and twist slightly). With the Rix, you have to push the cars together, inset the tool (and good luck with that if there is any significant curve in the track), and then push the cars apart.
 

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I have a Rix and several homemade skewer tools. I definitely think the skewers work better in all respects. There is almost no force involved (insert and twist slightly). With the Rix, you have to push the cars together, inset the tool (and good luck with that if there is any significant curve in the track), and then push the cars apart.
You're probably better with a skewer than some I've seen on Youtube. They often aren't very accurate going in so they poke or jab the coupler. Of course, I'm just beginning so I may find myself using skewers as well sometime :)
 

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You're probably better with a skewer than some I've seen on Youtube. They often aren't very accurate going in so they poke or jab the coupler. Of course, I'm just beginning so I may find myself using skewers as well sometime :)
I sometimes miss, given that my eyes aren't what they used to be, but it's still a very gentle prod. Slide the skewer into the gap between the knuckles and give it a slight twist. No jamming or other violent maneuvers are required.

Of course, a ham-fisted approach to any problem is rarely a good one.
 

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As so many have pointed out...the skewers are
a good uncouplers...but it does take practice to become
good at the chore. Set aside some time to to go over the
experience a number of times. Try it with a variety of
your cars. You'll notice that a
deft twist at the right time is the answer. The dry lube is also a very important factor.

However, even an experienced hand will encounter
a stubborn coupler. Just expect it. Blame the weather
and get on with it.

Don
 
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