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Regarding the "nail polish" trick...

The OP wrote in his original post:
"The turnout is set to power routing and this turnout is on a dead-end track i have industries on"

The only #4 turnouts that Kato makes (in HO) that have a power-routing option, ALL HAVE PLASTIC FROGS.

The only #4 turnout with a metal (nickel-silver) frog DOES NOT HAVE a power-routing option.

So... based on the info the OP provided, I don't see how applying nail polish to a PLASTIC frog is going to do very much...:mad:

One other thing:
I've found that the #4 manual turnouts (even the manual turnouts with an added powered switch motor) can sometimes be a bit "flaky" with power distribution. That's because that underneath the bottom cover, there are contacts that move when the switch is thrown. If the moving contacts don't make proper contact, the engine may stall (usually when moving through the "reverse" route.

Again, I suggest changing the screws on the bottom that govern power-routing.
Or... if the problem persists and nothing seems to help... change the switch itself.
 

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Regarding the "nail polish" trick...

The OP wrote in his original post:
"The turnout is set to power routing and this turnout is on a dead-end track i have industries on"

The only #4 turnouts that Kato makes (in HO) that have a power-routing option, ALL HAVE PLASTIC FROGS.

The only #4 turnout with a metal (nickel-silver) frog DOES NOT HAVE a power-routing option.

So... based on the info the OP provided, I don't see how applying nail polish to a PLASTIC frog is going to do very much...:mad:

One other thing:
I've found that the #4 manual turnouts (even the manual turnouts with an added powered switch motor) can sometimes be a bit "flaky" with power distribution. That's because that underneath the bottom cover, there are contacts that move when the switch is thrown. If the moving contacts don't make proper contact, the engine may stall (usually when moving through the "reverse" route.

Again, I suggest changing the screws on the bottom that govern power-routing.
Or... if the problem persists and nothing seems to help... change the switch itself.
First off, the nail polish doesn't go on the plastic frog. It goes on the rails approaching it, thereby effectively increasing the length of the frog and thus (hopefully) eliminating the short.

And you obviously didn't read the OP's original post carefully enough, nor did you read his response to your suggestion in post #17. He has already installed the turnout and has some scenery in that area that he doesn't want to damage in a rip-out process. So perhaps you could explain how you implement YOUR suggestions without either modifying or swapping out the turnout. Yes, it may come down to that, if nothing else works, but it certainly isn't the best choice in this situation, by a long shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Regarding the "nail polish" trick...

The OP wrote in his original post:
"The turnout is set to power routing and this turnout is on a dead-end track i have industries on"

The only #4 turnouts that Kato makes (in HO) that have a power-routing option, ALL HAVE PLASTIC FROGS.

The only #4 turnout with a metal (nickel-silver) frog DOES NOT HAVE a power-routing option.

So... based on the info the OP provided, I don't see how applying nail polish to a PLASTIC frog is going to do very much...:mad:

One other thing:
I've found that the #4 manual turnouts (even the manual turnouts with an added powered switch motor) can sometimes be a bit "flaky" with power distribution. That's because that underneath the bottom cover, there are contacts that move when the switch is thrown. If the moving contacts don't make proper contact, the engine may stall (usually when moving through the "reverse" route.

Again, I suggest changing the screws on the bottom that govern power-routing.
Or... if the problem persists and nothing seems to help... change the switch itself.
Here is a pic of the offending turnout, sorry for the blurry photo.
I failed to mention that this is in n scale
I cant tell if its steel or plastic, hard to see but it is black in color
558690
 

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It doesn't matter what it's made of. The frog is not the problem.
 
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