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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings,
I have an opportunity to aquire a handful of NOS Lambert h0 #6 turnouts at a great price. Ive never used, nor even seen them in person. Pros, cons?

TIA
 

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I had never heard of them...but they're out there. This sample looks good.


Don
From the pic in your link, they appear to be constructed much like the old Walthers/Shinohara turnouts. Some work would have to be done to make them "DCC friendly", but it's not hard to do.
 

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Usually remaining Lambert trackage is N scale whereas, though same maker, the HO version is under the Walthers name..In any event the switches are, unless already modified, 'power routing' types where, depending on the position of the points power is directed to that route whilst other route becomes dead. This type of switch was great in the old analog days where block control was king...Now that the majority have gone to digital control, power-routing type switches (TOs) are for the most part, not needed...
You can still employ them, and if you are DCC you can leave them the way they are and work around their power-routing feature. Or, you can turn them into what is know as 'all-live' switches by sawing gaps in correct places so as to prevent untraveled route from going dead...
All in all they are very well made trackwork. See if you can find out if they already are 'all-live' with gaps..(assuming you are DCC)..Also find out what code they are (70, 83). And make sure they have cross ties.. Some issues are bare rail held in gauge only by a few soldered on printed circuit strips shaped like ties (where you'll later on have to add the rest of the ties)..M
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry for the delay in replying...
Thanks for the opinions and info gentlemen. Especially TellTale.
Yes, I'm used to having to mod from power routing to all live with certain makes.
While I am handy at cutting rail since I dont care for plastic insulator joiners (thank you dremel) Im curious about Telltales statement of cutting rail to achieve all live rails. Mild confusion since I normally just solder in needed wires to negate power routing...

Code 100 here for a few general reasons btw.
Not dcc at this point. Plan to be within a year. Ive done some mild research of it and am convinced for the obvious reasons concerning wiring and no more insulated blocks just run at least two trains in same direction, let alone opposite...
All that said: It seems to me, per opinions here, that the Lambert turnouts are built well enough to do the sale. And yes. They certainley do resemble older shinohara configurations once I compared them. Is what it is...
Again, thank you. So nice to get info here as opposed to racking my brain in perpetuity trying to decide on things.
 

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Sorry for the delay in replying...
Thanks for the opinions and info gentlemen. Especially TellTale.
Yes, I'm used to having to mod from power routing to all live with certain makes.
While I am handy at cutting rail since I dont care for plastic insulator joiners (thank you dremel) Im curious about Telltales statement of cutting rail to achieve all live rails. Mild confusion since I normally just solder in needed wires to negate power routing...

Code 100 here for a few general reasons btw.
Not dcc at this point. Plan to be within a year. Ive done some mild research of it and am convinced for the obvious reasons concerning wiring and no more insulated blocks just run at least two trains in same direction, let alone opposite...
All that said: It seems to me, per opinions here, that the Lambert turnouts are built well enough to do the sale. And yes. They certainley do resemble older shinohara configurations once I compared them. Is what it is...
Again, thank you. So nice to get info here as opposed to racking my brain in perpetuity trying to decide on things.


kilowatt62;

I'm not sure what telltale means by "all live". I'm guessing it just means that both routes of the turnout have power all the time.
However for DCC use, you can convert those Lambert turnouts to the "DCC friendly/compatible" configuration you may have seen in turnout advertising.
To do that, you would cut gaps in all four rails near where they enter the metal frog. This creates what's called an "isolated frog" which simply means that the frog is electrically insulated from every other rail in the turnout.
Solder a feed wire to the frog, along with the normal two wires to the two running rails. The wire from the frog can be connected to either a commercial "frog juicer" circuit board, or to micro switch that is triggered by the movement of the turnout's points (The popular Tortoise switch machine has such micro switches factory installed.) This changes the electrical polarity of the frog, which is necessary because the frog will be part of the left rail on one route through the turnout, and part of the right rail on the other route. However, If all your locos have all-wheel electrical pickup, you might choose to forego frog feeder wires, frog juicers, and/or micro switches, altogether, to save cost & effort, and just leave the frog unpowered. This may cause short switcher locomotives, or locomotives that have only a few wheels picking up power, to stall on the frog. Preventing such stalls, is the reason behind powering the frog.

The point rails on that Lambert turnout are held in place by metal straps. That could be a possible problem with DCC, since the DCC friendly configuration calls for the two point rails to be electrically insulated from each other. Each of the point rails should also be jumpered to the nearest "stock"/running rail too. If the metal straps were left intact, this would create a dead short across the rails of the turnout.
Having the DCC friendly configuration is not absolutely essential to operate with DCC, but it does eliminate a possible short circuit between a point rail, and its nearby stock rail when a metal wheel bridges the two rails. This wouldn't bother a DC power pack much, but can temporarily shut down a DCC system.

It would be possible, though a lot of work, to modify the Lambert turnout to the full DCC friendly configuration. To do this I would drill out the two rivets and remove the point rails assembly, including both metal straps, from the turnout. Then unsolder the strap that was closest to the frog end of the turnout. Add a conventional metal rail joiner to the that end of each point rail. Then unsolder the other metal strap. Remove the original plastic throwbar and install a printed circuit board tie (Clover House) as a new throwbar. Re-install the point rails back onto the closure rails using the rail joiners. Solder the point rails to the new PC tie throwbar and check their spacing with the "points" tabs of an NMRA gauge. Cut a very shallow notch, just through the copper cladding, at the middle of the PC throwbar. Add jumpers between each closure rail and the adjacent stock rail. You now have a DCC friendly configured Lambert turnout.

Far easier, but more expensive, would be to buy Micro Engineering turnouts, or Peco's new "Unifrog" turnouts, which come with the DCC friendly configuration factory-installed. The file below has more info on turnouts.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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I omitted above that Lambert N / Walthers HO switches have always been the go-to for curved switches for me !
I have several packed away for ensuing layout..They're power-routing but I know how to contend with that for DCC...
And they're very reliable looks and continuity-wise...But yes, they're costly !! M
 
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