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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yea, it’s happening again, but it’s not just cause I’m bored this time. I haven’t been able to run trains almost all year because they can’t make it up the hill 7%-ish grade (the main reason I haven’t been active on the forum, plus high school and all that.) so I’m starting again.


Before
Wood Flooring Wall Floor Rectangle


After
Flooring Wood Floor Road surface Grass


lotta plaster stains, plus a road, and my Exacto knife (I spent almost 3 days looking for that like 7 months ago). I’ll find a way to fix that. Probably just paint over it and say the grass will add texture to ground.
 

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Just saying I purchased the static king by woodland scenic from a hobby shop earlier and I would never go back to just normal ground foam. Just from what I’ve done this far I’m blown away with how well it’s actually working. The first picture is kind of a before and after
 

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I admire your willingness to redo it when it doesn't perform to expectations! Good luck on this version!
 

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You can also look for "mis-tints" at the paint counters of big box home improvement stores. Are you driving yet, and do you have access to a vehicle?
 

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Nice ride! You will have to forgive me for not seeing it, but I don't read (or even look at) the off topic section.
 

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Yea, it’s happening again, but it’s not just cause I’m bored this time. I haven’t been able to run trains almost all year because they can’t make it up the hill 7%-ish grade (the main reason I haven’t been active on the forum, plus high school and all that.) so I’m starting again.


Before
View attachment 570840

After View attachment 570841

lotta plaster stains, plus a road, and my Exacto knife (I spent almost 3 days looking for that like 7 months ago). I’ll find a way to fix that. Probably just paint over it and say the grass will add texture to ground.
Annie;

A seven percent grade? o_O That would be something a real railroad, (and most model railroads) would never have. There were exceptions, like switchbacks, and cog railways, but real railroads (and some model railroads) consider a two percent grade pretty much as steep as they can handle while pulling a decent length train. Even then, they may need to add some extra locomotives to make it up the hill. My favorite prototype, The Milwaukee Road, had a real doozy of a grade coming out of tide flats yard in Tacoma, Washington. They routinely used nine F-units as helpers, plus the normal three-unit road locomotive consist, to drag a train, cut into short sections, up the 3.57% grade.

Real world terrain is seldom anything like as perfectly flat as most model railroads, so go ahead and leave that grass in place, and add scenery over it if you want. Drainage shapes real land, and your new layout will look better if you include drainage ditches along the sides of the track, roads, and other spots where water would run off. (see photos)

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Annie;

A seven percent grade? o_O That would be something a real railroad, (and most model railroads) would never have. There were exceptions, like switchbacks, and cog railways, but real railroads (and some model railroads) consider a two percent grade pretty much as steep as they can handle while pulling a decent length train. Even then, they may need to add some extra locomotives to make it up the hill. My favorite prototype, The Milwaukee Road, had a real doozy of a grade coming out of tide flats yard in Tacoma, Washington. They routinely used nine F-units as helpers, plus the normal three-unit road locomotive consist, to drag a train, cut into short sections, up the 3.57% grade.

Real world terrain is seldom anything like as perfectly flat as most model railroads, so go ahead and leave that grass in place, and add scenery over it if you want. Drainage shapes real land, and your new layout will look better if you include drainage ditches along the sides of the track, roads, and other spots where water would run off. (see photos)

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂
Oh yea, 7% grade, not to mention the random dips in the track that engines with a low fuel tank would get caught on, it definitely needed to be redone.

I’ll try my best with the scenery but it’s not my strong suit… at all.
 

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Oh yea, 7% grade, not to mention the random dips in the track that engines with a low fuel tank would get caught on, it definitely needed to be redone.

I’ll try my best with the scenery but it’s not my strong suit… at all.


Annie;

From your photo, it looks like you are building on a sheet of extruded foam. May I ask what you are using for roadbed? As you have found out through your recent experience, track shouldn't have dips that snag fuel tanks, or grades that a train can't climb. One way to keep track flat is with good, solid, flat, roadbed glued under it. If you're using a track brand like Kato, with the rigid roadbed built-in, that shouldn't be an issue. Flex track, or plain, non-roadbed, sectional track, is a different matter. On My layout I use 1/8" Luan plywood for roadbed. I don't have a continuous slab of foam under my layout, it's more like open grid construction. Under the roadbed and track is a flat, and extremely rigid, sub-roadbed made of 1/4" Luan with 3/4" x 1/8" pine stringers glued under each side. This forms a sort of inverted U-girder, which can't warp.
For your foam-based layout, you can skip the sub-roadbed construction. The sheet of foam IS your sub-roadbed. However, if you used cork or commercial foam roadbed on your previous layout, that may be one reason for the dips. You might consider something more rigid, like 1/8" - 1/4" thick Luan plywood cut to the shape of your track, and glued down to the foam. As for scenery and 7% grades, you will learn by experience. Just do your best, and learn from your mistakes. That's all any of us can do really.

Good Luck & Have Fun on your new build.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Picked up a book from the library and it had a track plan in it that I liked, I think I’m going going to use this one.
World Book Publication Art Font

I’ve also decided I want this layout to be winter, I’ve tried it other layouts and it looked terrible, hopefully this one will be different.
 

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That’s a neat layout. It already is starting to look good. Those books take me back a long time ago. One thing I’d recommend with winter scenery is to build a 8” by 8” diorama to experiment on (I speak from experience.).
Train Rolling stock Nature Motor vehicle Tree
 

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Picked up a book from the library and it had a track plan in it that I liked, I think I’m going going to use this one.
View attachment 571227
I’ve also decided I want this layout to be winter, I’ve tried it other layouts and it looked terrible, hopefully this one will be different.
Annie;

That looks like a good track plan. Its similar to the one on my grandson Hudson's layout.

Winter scenery doesn't have to be hard. Your Library may have Model Railroader Magazine (Usually in their children's section o_O ) or at least be able to order it for you. There are two old articles both written by a guy named Rand Hood. One is called "Modeling a Rainscape" and the other is "Modeling a Snowscape". The latter one has some 'cool' (pun intended) information on modeling winter scenery.
Woodland scenics sells artificial snow, which is really finely ground white Styrofoam. If you have access to an electric sander, or even sandpaper, and some of those shaped Styrofoam packing inserts that stuff comes shipped in, you can make your own "snow" for free. Woodland scenics scenery materials are far from free! They believe in high profit margins at W/S 😕

You can make frost with a Tamiya model paint called "Flat Base." Brush a tiny amount along the edges of a window on one of your layout's buildings to show how cold it is outside. Clear nylon fishing line can be used to make model icicles. Clamp one end in a vise. Heat the other end with a match or soldering iron, then quickly grab the heated end with needle-nosed pliers and pull gently. The stretched fishing line will thin out to a point, and look like an icicle. Super glue a line of those along the roof edge.

Plaster, in powdered form, also makes convincing snow. The file below shows how I made the trees in the photos. Spray some Aquanet, or other cheap hairspray, over a finished tree and sprinkle on a bit of powdered plaster Viola! Snow covered pine tree. For snow on the ground paint your blue foam with some flat white acrylic house paint, Then sift on some plaster while the paint is still wet. Instant snowstorm!
Practice some of these techniques on scrap material, or a small corner of your layout. With some practice you'll be able to freeze things up like Princess Ilse in Frozen ! :rolleyes:

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Annie;

That looks like a good track plan. Its similar to the one on my grandson Hudson's layout.

Winter scenery doesn't have to be hard. Your Library may have Model Railroader Magazine (Usually in their children's section o_O ) or at least be able to order it for you. There are two old articles both written by a guy named Rand Hood. One is called "Modeling a Rainscape" and the other is "Modeling a Snowscape". The latter one has some 'cool' (pun intended) information on modeling winter scenery.
Woodland scenics sells artificial snow, which is really finely ground white Styrofoam. If you have access to an electric sander, or even sandpaper, and some of those shaped Styrofoam packing inserts that stuff comes shipped in, you can make your own "snow" for free. Woodland scenics scenery materials are far from free! They believe in high profit margins at W/S 😕

You can make frost with a Tamiya model paint called "Flat Base." Brush a tiny amount along the edges of a window on one of your layout's buildings to show how cold it is outside. Clear nylon fishing line can be used to make model icicles. Clamp one end in a vise. Heat the other end with a match or soldering iron, then quickly grab the heated end with needle-nosed pliers and pull gently. The stretched fishing line will thin out to a point, and look like an icicle. Super glue a line of those along the roof edge.

Plaster, in powdered form, also makes convincing snow. The file below shows how I made the trees in the photos. Spray some Aquanet, or other cheap hairspray, over a finished tree and sprinkle on a bit of powdered plaster Viola! Snow covered pine tree. For snow on the ground paint your blue foam with some flat white acrylic house paint, Then sift on some plaster while the paint is still wet. Instant snowstorm!
Practice some of these techniques on scrap material, or a small corner of your layout. With some practice you'll be able to freeze things up like Princess Ilse in Frozen ! :rolleyes:

Good Luck & Have Fun;

Traction Fan 🙂
I picked up these (not the “Beginners guide to N scale modelat the library, they were on sale but the librarian I could have them for free cause they’ve been in the “for sale” section for years, I’m hoping there’s some stuff in one of them about snowscape stuff, however I will try and see if I can get the “Modeling a Snowscape book”

Publication Wood Bumper Event Metal


trains are running nice, no real electricity problems this time, they’ve plagued me in the past.


I’ll also try that frost/icicle idea.

so I don’t have to spend as much on fake snow I’m thinking I’m going to lightly dust spray paint over the ground and then add the fake snow, it might work, maybe not, we’ll see.
 
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