Model Train Forum banner

1 - 20 of 86 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

As many of you may know, I recently picked up (via ebay) a Lionel 221 "Dreyfuss Hudson" streamliner steam loco with mated whistle tender, ca. 1946-47. The ebay seller had given both a nice black re-spray, and added some new green loco markers and some red tender tail lights.

I opened up the loco and gave her a good cleaning and lube. All good ... runs nice.

I've just added new "221" tags to the loco cab using Woodland Scenics #MG712 Roman Silver dry-transfer decals. Came out great, I think. A HUGE "thank you" to Cory / Tuner571 for the tip on these. Very close match to Lionel's original font style. Very easy to use, no "clear film margin" outside of the actual numbers. I'd highly recomment the WS product here. The MG712 sheet comes with 6 different font sizes. I used the 3/16" here.

Here's some pics, in case anybody down the road is ever wondering what these look like inside.

4-Position E-Unit (fwd-neutral-reverse-neutral)
Coil spring mounted brushes
Non-roller contact shoes

TJ















 

·
Railroad Tycoon
Joined
·
23,868 Posts
Nice. I like the tender lights too
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Lionel 221 -- The Sequel ...

I picked up my second Lionel 221 at the recent Amherst (West Springfield, MA) train show. This one is rusted and busted. I haggled with the dealer a bit, and after his solemn promise that "This train is gauranteed to work .. or NOT!", we settled on a purchase price of $35. A fair gamble, I thought!


Here's the beast, as found ... kind of mangy looking, I think ...




When I put her on the test track at home, there were no intial signs of life. That didn't surprise me too much, though. I pulled off the shell, and then fully removed the e-unit. (The wiring was badly cracked/corroded throughout, so I knew I was in for a full rewire job.)

With the e-unit removed, I could see that the power lead wire from the inside (top) of the pickup plate assembly to the e-unit had broken off at the pickup end. I've replaced power leads like this before, but usually by popping the fiber pickup plate out of the motor (with the wheels removed). Here, however, the wheels are solid and firmly mounted to their axles, so I didn't want to go that route.

Instead, I opted to "fish my way" through the back door. Here's how I replaced the pickup power lead ...

Here's the bottom of the loco. This type of motor has pickup shoes, rather than pickup rollers. They are removed in this photo, but I've shown where they clip on. There's also a metal Lionel nameplate that is tabbed into the black fiber pickup plate assembly with 4 metal tabs ...




Here, you can see the 4 metal tabs holding the nameplate, and the old glob of solder where the broken-off pickup lead wire used to be. I've bent the tabs upwards with a long, tiny screwdriver, and am about to pop the nameplate off ...




Here's the removed nameplate ...




That exposes a pair of rivet holes which hold the copper pickup spring-plate to the inside (top) of the black fiber pickup plate. The rear hole (to the right) had old solder for the old power lead, but below I've cleaned that solder away and ensured that the rivet hole is open/clear ...




To rewire, I used repro cloth-covered, single-strand 22-gauge wire (available from Jeff Kane). I remove insulation from about 3/16" of one end of the wire, and then bend that exposed wire 90-degrees into an "L" shape. Then comes the fishing expedition ... carefully fish the wire over the rear axle and under the rear cross-bar and poke the uninsuslated wire end out through the rear rivet hole ...




Once the wire has been fished through, bend it's end over to "crimp" it in place ...




Then, solder that on, with easy access from the underside of the motor. After soldering, I use a Dremel to grind down the solder bead reasonably flush (more or less) with the black fiber plate. This ensure that the Lionel nameplate will be positioned flush.




With the new power lead attached, I show here how I can bench-test the motor with some jumper leads. The e-unit has been removed, for now ... that's a project for later. Current flows through the brush cans and armature (orientation to be toggled via e-unit for loco direction flip-flop), and then downstream through the field coil, and then to the field coil metal plates, which are grounded to the motor frame and outer wheels...




And ... SUCCESS!!! ... this old motor spins once again like a champ!

Regards,

TJ
 

Attachments

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I've rewired the 221 motor.

The e-unit took some finessing. The tiny inner wire lead to the solenoid coil had been broken off close to the coil. There was just enough "tail" for me to solder on an extension, though it's just a solder-held joint, with no wire twists. I wrapped the joint in heat shrink, and put a dap of hot glue over it to restrict any damaging bumps.

The mechanics of the motor includes several stepped reduction gears. One thing that's interesting is the inertial effect on the motor when power is turned off ... the motor keeps charging down the track for a ways, dissipating all of that inertial energy. Brute force power, I call it! Yeehaa!!!

TJ



 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
Nice restoration job. This has been Like watching that cable show American Restoration
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
I'm looking forward to the body work segment... After a word from our sponsors.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Nice restoration job. This has been Like watching that cable show American Restoration
Thanks, guys.

I love that show, but I'm always amazed how the guy comes up with his cost estimates in about 8 seconds ... "Ahhh ... breakdown, 4 hours of body work, fabricate a few parts, 6 hours of custom paint ... yeah ... we're lookin' at around $6500." :eek: I'm not questioning his price ... I just have no idea how he can calculate all that's involved so fast!
 

·
Railroad Tycoon
Joined
·
23,868 Posts
Nice....neat....work.:thumbsup::D

Gears look kind of dry?:confused:
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Gears look kind of dry?:confused:
Old Hawk Eye Ed strikes again. Spot on. The motor's gonna sit idle for a few months until I tackle the shell redo (springtime painting), so I haven't lubed the motor yet. I should though, I guess, just to prevent any oxidation. OK, Ed ... you got me. :D

I hope TJ is a lot better looking than the guys on that show...
I think I'd need a few train tattoos on my arms, in order to compete!

TJ
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Lionel 221T Tender graphics / decals

OK, guys ... did I make the right decision???

I ordered a bunch of stuff from Jeff Kane the other day, and added some "New York Central" decals for my eventual redo of my latest Lionel 221T tender to the order list.

Here's what the tender should look like when restored ...



QUESTION ...

When I ordered the decals from Jeff, I had a choice of water-transfer decals for the tender side, or peel-n-stick decals. I figured (naively) that the water transfer decals would yield a cleaner, more professional look. However ...

Each side (text, stripes) is one full decal. Very large. I have ZERO experience with water-transfer decals. I do recall reading, however, that it's difficult to work with large decals.

Have I shot myself in the foot with ordering the water-transfer decals (as opposed to the peel-n-stick ones) here? Is there a high chance that the decal might tear during install?

Any basic tips on how to apply a large water-transfer decal ???

The restorarion work is still some months down the road, but I'm startin' to feel itchy about this decision ...

TJ
 

·
Railroad Tycoon
Joined
·
23,868 Posts
Send them back and get the others?

Save them and get the others?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Maybe double the order? I agree that water would look more professional. Maybe you could order two set sof the decals in case one rips AND order their cheapest set of large decals to practice on something. I don't know how much they are but I can't imagine decals are too expensive. Am I wrong?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Maybe double the order? I agree that water would look more professional. Maybe you could order two set sof the decals in case one rips AND order their cheapest set of large decals to practice on something. I don't know how much they are but I can't imagine decals are too expensive. Am I wrong?
$5 for the left/right pair of decals (from Jeff Kane).

TJ
 

·
Yard Master & Research
Joined
·
10,635 Posts
Place the decal on by width not length. Then the top and corners are straight. Then slide.
Try not to pull it apart after it is on and you try to remove the water.
Someone suggested a coat of dullcote when finished. In another thread.


WIth your mass production/disease go half a dozen each. :D
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
221 Strip Tease

As springtime begins to whisper its song in our ears, I'm itchin' to do some paint work. Still a bit cold, but plenty of prep work to keep me busy.

The 221 frolicked in an Easy Off bath, and a wire brushdown. Still more crevice work to do, along with all of the inside of the shell. Getting there, though ...

TJ

 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 86 Posts
Top