Model Train Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

When I finish my basement I would like to put a Lionel train track on my wall (near the ceiling) that goes around the room.

I have been wondering what it would take to make it work. The room is 16X42 so the track would be about 116ft long or actually a 116ft loop.

What kind of power would I need to make the train run properly? Do I need to have electric current on opposite sides of the room?

Its been a long time since I have been into trains.

Thanks for your input!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,666 Posts
This is only a partial answer to your question, but it's quite common for large loops to run multiple power leads from the transformer to intervals around the perimeter of the track. I.e., you have much less resistance loss in large-gauge wire than you do in the track itself. That helps keep the track voltage as high and consistent as possible.

Cheers,

TJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Depends what type of track you are running and condition. If you are using older Lionel tube track, the tightness of your pins will affect things greatly.

Whatever track you use, I suggest your run a power (and return) conductor along the track and splice in where needed. It is far easier to solder a hot and return conductor every ten feet then solder every track togather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,737 Posts
Bob Nelson on trains.com removes the track pins and solders the sections together. While it is a lot of work initially, he says he does it so he can easily remove a track section without tearing up half his layout. I find his logic impeccable, but I am still using pins because when I have a layout, it is on the floor.

I use old tubular track, and bend the rails where the pins are installed to make a tight connection. I don't squeeze the open end of the rail as I have found that doesn't work very well. I bend the center rail to the right and the left rail to the left. This makes a very good connection as long as the pins are not rusty and the inside of the rails are not rusty.
Bruce Baker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,737 Posts
When you run the power wires, use at least 14 gauge and use smaller wires to go from the main power wires to the track. It is difficult or impossible to get a 14 gauge wire into a lockon or clip.

BB
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top