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Yes I'm still a newbie lol. Laying two tracks side by side is it 1 1/16 or 1 1/4 inch between the rails? thanks for any reply's
 

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Best answer is to teach you to fish. Go to the NMRA (that's National Model Railroad Association; yeah, it's a thing) website and look at their standards and recommended practices. In this case, you'll want RP-7. Here is a link to the page: NMRA Standards and Recommended Practices
 

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Since I don't have the patience for standards and mumbo stuff I'll just do it my way. After all it's my railroad. But I do thank you
 

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Since you don't have the patience, why did you ask? Just go ahead and do it yourself!
 
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I agree with Fire21 !! He even gave you a link to simply click with one finger and you still dissed him !!
 

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Since I don't have the patience for standards and mumbo stuff I'll just do it my way. After all it's my railroad. But I do thank you
RonnieC;

If you don't have patience, and plenty of it, and if your not willing to look up what you call "mumbo stuff", then maybe model railroading, or at least this forum, isn't for you.
This hobby requires near infinite patience to do many things.
If you ask a question on this forum, you're likely to get answers, probably several, often conflicting, and practically never restricted to only whatever narrowly framed answer you expected. One that will fit neatly into your preconceptions.
For example, an intelligent answer to your question about the spacing between parallel tracks is not as simple as picking one of the two dimensions you quoted in your question. What radius curves you are using, and what length locomotives and cars will need to travel through those curves, will both affect the track spacing.

One of our experienced members gave you a simple way to look up the track spacing for various lengths of rolling stock, and curve tightness, and your response is "I don't have the patience" to look up the answer that fits my railroad. "I'll just do it my way. After all it's my railroad" Yes it is your railroad, and after a response like this, even with an afterthought thank you tacked on the end, you may find that you'll need to do everything on "your railroad" "your way", because you may not get much help here.
I used CTValley's link and was able to look up the curved track spacing straight from the index. The information was laid out for easy reference right on the page. If you found the NMRA site confusing, that's OK. By your own statement, you're a newbie. Just ask for help in navigating the NMRA site if that's the problem.

Traction Fan
 

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RonnieC;

If you don't have patience, and plenty of it, and if your not willing to look up what you call "mumbo stuff", then maybe model railroading, or at least this forum, isn't for you.
This hobby requires near infinite patience to do many things.
If you ask a question on this forum, you're likely to get answers, probably several, often conflicting, and practically never restricted to only whatever narrowly framed answer you expected. One that will fit neatly into your preconceptions.
For example, an intelligent answer to your question about the spacing between parallel tracks is not as simple as picking one of the two dimensions you quoted in your question. What radius curves you are using, and what length locomotives and cars will need to travel through those curves, will both affect the track spacing.

One of our experienced members gave you a simple way to look up the track spacing for various lengths of rolling stock, and curve tightness, and your response is "I don't have the patience" to look up the answer that fits my railroad. "I'll just do it my way. After all it's my railroad" Yes it is your railroad, and after a response like this, even with an afterthought thank you tacked on the end, you may find that you'll need to do everything on "your railroad" "your way", because you may not get much help here.
I used CTValley's link and was able to look up the curved track spacing straight from the index. The information was laid out for easy reference right on the page. If you found the NMRA site confusing, that's OK. By your own statement, you're a newbie. Just ask for help in navigating the NMRA site if that's the problem.

Traction Fan
I found the answer for the curve too.
Is there an answer in there for the straight?
Or would that be the same as the curve?
 

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Wow, OP has a funny way of making friends.....nice......
So whatever you use for the curve you should use for the straight?
I never referred to the standard, I just went with what I thought was good.
N scale I never laid down yet.
 

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Distance between track centers depends on what you are running and how tight your curves are. For N scale 1-1/16” is safe for straights whatever you run. If you are running modern equipment you will need as much as 1-5/8” on a 9-13/16” curve.
 

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I found the answer for the curve too.
Is there an answer in there for the straight?
Or would that be the same as the curve?
Big Ed;

The curves are the critical point because of car overhang. On tight-medium radius curves you need more space between tracks than you do on straight track. You can either use the same wide spacing as on the curves, or a narrower spacing on the straight tracks, your option.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Distance between track centers depends on what you are running and how tight your curves are. For N scale 1-1/16” is safe for straights whatever you run. If you are running modern equipment you will need as much as 1-5/8” on a 9-13/16” curve.
Thanks
 

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Big Ed;

The curves are the critical point because of car overhang. On tight-medium radius curves you need more space between tracks than you do on straight track. You can either use the same wide spacing as on the curves, or a narrower spacing on the straight tracks, your option.

Traction Fan 🙂
Thanks, that is what I was thinking.
But in the link that was posted for the standard is there a standard given in there for the measurement between straights?
I couldn't find it if there is one listed.
I never used that NRMA guide before.
I guess that is like the Bible of model railroad building to some, I would think they would list it between the straights too?
I always just winged it as I went along, making sure there was enough room. :)
 

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All you fella's are right. I sincerely apologize for my remarks.
Thanks Ronnie, we appreciate your honesty. Apology accepted. Good luck with your railroad. :)
 

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Thanks, that is what I was thinking.
But in the link that was posted for the standard is there a standard given in there for the measurement between straights?
I couldn't find it if there is one listed.
I never used that NRMA guide before.
I guess that is like the Bible of model railroad building to some, I would think they would list it between the straights too?
I always just winged it as I went along, making sure there was enough room. :)
Big Ed;

I haven't used that NMRA page before either. I just looked for spacing on curves because that's the place where things can hit each other! Parallel straight tracks can be as close together as you want, so long as your widest cars won't sideswipe themselves. I tend to be conservative and leave a bit of extra room for my fat fingers to get between derailed cars. Parallel yard or station tracks can sometimes be quite close together on the prototype. One consideration for duplicating this in the model world is the type, and reliability of automatic couplers you're using, and your confidence level in them. If you use Kadee/Micro-Trains magnetic couplers and their delayed uncoupling feature, then the tracks can be closer. If you are uncoupling with a stick, you might need a little more room. One of those Rix magnet uncoupling wands would require even more room.

Traction Fan 🙂
 
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