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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,

Good news, I will be moving into the new house within a month and I am very excited. I wanted to show you the space I have to work with this time.





From the corner of the wall (near wash sink) to the corner of the house is approximately 16 feet. I am not sure if I am only going to keep it on that wall or go onto the other wall you see there or not. I want to move the sink down the wall further so I can put my helix there so it is not visible from the layout.

More updates to come, I have been trying to pack up my train stuff little by little, I did not realize how much stuff I had in the basement :goofball:

EDIT: pictures are working now

The layout will be a shelf layout with 2 levels. The first level 30 inches wide and the second level 18 inches wide.

More updates after the basement is worked on and ready for me to move my stuff in.
 

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Hopefully, by "worked on" you mean that bare concrete covered or painted and a ceiling installed....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sort answer, yes

Obviously the previous owner did not finish the basement. So we will be doing a drop ceiling, painting the walls, and covering the floors (I think tile and area rugs).

I wanted to stud frame the walls and put drywall, but we do not want to have a moisture problem between the drywall and concrete. So I am going to have to figure something else out for attaching the layout to the wall. possible just straight into the concrete wall? I do not know
 

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There are many moisture barrier or framing products that will allow you to cover those walls, if you so choose (and the budget allows), without fear of moisture problems. Grab an issue of Family Handyman magazine or similar and you will see several ads for them.
 

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Well, just remember that it is MUCH easier to finish a room BEFORE there is a layout in it. But I understand budget and time constraints.
 

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Consider self standing benchwork for your layout. There
is not a great advantage for using the wall as support.

It is much easier to make changes or additions when
you can move the layout. And you won't have the
scars from whatever you use to attach to the wall.

Don
 

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http://www.drylok.com/

This is good stuff. It's a bit pricey at $32-35/gallon, depending on where you get it. It comes as water based latex or oil based. For painting over it, wait 24 hours for the latex, 30 days for the oil based. Somehow it seems to me that the oil based would be a better waterproofer, but I'm just guessing. If you can, paint the walls now and most of the smell will be gone by the time you move in. A gallon will cover 75-100 sq. feet.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Small update, no pictures just telling you about some progress on the basement work.

We took a grinder to the walls to smooth them out and them put a cement plaster to fill the holes. It is so smooth, looks like it is dry walled in my opinion. We also painted the walls.

Next, we are sealing the floor. Then walls will be put up. Then tiling the floor. Then drop cleaning. Then train..... lots of "then" haha
 

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http://www.drylok.com/

This is good stuff. It's a bit pricey at $32-35/gallon, depending on where you get it. It comes as water based latex or oil based. For painting over it, wait 24 hours for the latex, 30 days for the oil based. Somehow it seems to me that the oil based would be a better waterproofer, but I'm just guessing. If you can, paint the walls now and most of the smell will be gone by the time you move in. A gallon will cover 75-100 sq. feet.
Been selling Drylok for many years, and let me say this: Don't get the oil based version. If any moisture gets trapped behind it, it will form cracks over time and cause more problems. The water-based Drylock is excellent, as it forms a breathable membrane on the concrete, and will never crack. You will notice it's a lot thicker than normal paint because it is considered a membrane rather than a paint. But.....it's worth the money!

-J.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
hey guys,

nothing with the layout yet, still moving and working on the basement. Lots going on in life and not enough time to do much of anything.

Anyway, I was at home depot today to get studs for a wall we are building in the basement. So I was looking at prices for wood for my layout, about $3 for an 8ft 2x4 OR $6 for a 1x3. Is the only reason people go with the 1x3 for weight reduction??

Thanks
 

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Since wood is sold by the board foot (a fictional piece of wood 1" thick and a foot square), pricing for similar species and grades would normally be higher for the thicker lumber (i.e. 8' 2x4). All else being equal, an 8' 1x4 should be about half the price of a 2x4. I suspect that you're comparing prices for the garbage 2x4 that home improvement centers typically sell for "framing boards" with higher grade common or clear pine intended for woodworking.

Since you don't need the strength of a 2x4 (which, as you've probably noticed, is used for framing houses), most people opt for the cheaper 1x cuts. If the weight and bulk is not an issue, then go with price. If you're going to hide or paint your benchwork, quality of the lumber doesn't matter much. It if will be more of a finished piece of furniture, then you may want to opt for the better quality boards.
 

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If you are building a wall of course use a 2x4. They are cheaper and stronger than a 1x3.

If you are insulating then the batt insulation will fit perfectly between the 2x4s. With 3" lumber you will compress the insulation and it will lose R-value.

If you are running electrical 3" lumber might not give enough depth for the outlet boxes.

Also, if you are drywalling it's easier to attach to a 2x4 than a 1x3. Your target is 1.5" wide as compared to 0.75" wide.

But for bench work then what CT says - go thin and light. 1x3.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
School has started and we just finished moving. We started working on the basement, so that will be what I am doing for the next few weekends. Then I can start the layout when I have the chance.

We have discussed the type of wood to use for the layout multiple times in multiple threads. I have done my research and decided to use 2x3s for the majority of the bench work.
-Not the 1x3/4 because of the cost. My Home Depot and Lowes only sell furniture grade dimensional lumber and it is almost $10 for an 8 foot board. That would get expensive.
-Not 2x4 because I do not need the extra weight of the wood. Sure it is not that much different than the 2x3s I will be using, but every little bit counts toward weight. It also costs like $2.50 for a kiln dried 8 foot board.

If you have a concern with using 2x3s, let me know, but I think it is my best choice for my wallet and the strength it will provide.

Lets finally talk about the layout itself. I have a picture below showing the room with the dimensions of what I have to work with. I would like to keep the desk where I have it and keep the layout on the opposite wall. That wall is an exterior wall, we grinded all the walls smooth, filled in the holes, sealed the wall and painted the wall. I will not be attaching the layout to the wall either.

Here is my layout plan, tell me your honest opinion. I am also doing this away is it is easier to move later down the road. The plan is to make multiple 4 foot by 2.5 foot tables (somewhat like modular) If I decide to change the elevation of the layout at different points, I can just make the legs longer for that section of table.

I am not sure if I want to do multiple levels of bench work, but for now I am just going to focus on the main level with the thought of a second level in the works. That mainly depends on if I have the room for the trains to get from one level to the next (helix, gradual slope... something)

Here is what I would like to here from you; how would you use that space that I have? I have some ideas but nothing that I really like so far. The table sizes can be changed if your idea would require it.

If you have an idea, post it and I will draw it out and see what I think about it.

Thanks for reading

 

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Its not clear from your drawing where the door into the room is. I expect that will have some impact on the layout. Also, what kind of layout are you primarily looking for? Do you want long continuous runs or more of a shelf type switching layout? Do you want a storage yard and if so, hidden or visible?

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The room does not have a door, the "enterance" to the room is right after you get down the steps. I would like to keep the layout away from the enterance, but it could be somewhat along that wall. I can post a picture later, I am on my phone right now.

The closet area has a door, it will be that the top of the rectangle how it is in the picture, again I'll show it better in the next picture post.

As for the layout. I am thinking more shelf type layout and with a hidden staging under the layout. Possibly a small yard on the layout. I would like to have the whole 15 foot wall as layout plus some.
 

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Where do you get 2x3 lumber? Other than ripping a 2x6 in half on a table saw, I don't know that I've ever seen it.

Off the shelf 1x lumber is plenty strong enough. Why not use that?
 

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I spent about an hour looking through track plans hoping something would jump out that I could recommend. I had a good time doing that, but I've come to the conclusion that you need to come up with at least something that you like as a starting point that you can then ask for advice about from the forum members here. There's just too many variables and personal preferences each of us has.

If you held a gun to my head and demanded a plan, I'd say take a look at a plan called "Saranac & Wolf Pond". I found it in "101 More Track Plans for Model Railroaders", page 28. Its in Model Railroader's online plan database if you have access to that. If you Google it, you'll also see it listed in a couple other books. As published, its 6 x 16.5 feet, but I think it could be shortened in length. It has both a continuous run dogbone mainline and a somewhat complex switching track layout too. Sorry about not posting a picture, but I'm sensitive to copyright rules. Hope that might get you started with some possibilities.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Where do you get 2x3 lumber? Other than ripping a 2x6 in half on a table saw, I don't know that I've ever seen it.

Off the shelf 1x lumber is plenty strong enough. Why not use that?
I understand that the 1x lumber is plenty strong enough, I just do not see the reason for spending almost 5x more on the benchwork on lighter 1x lumber than just getting 2x lumber. I understand that it will be heavier, but there really aren't anymore negatives for using 2x lumber for the benchwork. Some people say that it is harder to cut and drill into than 1x lumber, but I have all the tools to easily do whatever it is that I need to do to build the benchwork.

My local Home Depot has some weird things in stock, including 2x3 lumber. I will probably go there tonight to pick some up just so that they do not sell it all and they do not order more of it.

I spent about an hour looking through track plans hoping something would jump out that I could recommend. I had a good time doing that, but I've come to the conclusion that you need to come up with at least something that you like as a starting point that you can then ask for advice about from the forum members here. There's just too many variables and personal preferences each of us has.

If you held a gun to my head and demanded a plan, I'd say take a look at a plan called "Saranac & Wolf Pond". I found it in "101 More Track Plans for Model Railroaders", page 28. Its in Model Railroader's online plan database if you have access to that. If you Google it, you'll also see it listed in a couple other books. As published, its 6 x 16.5 feet, but I think it could be shortened in length. It has both a continuous run dogbone mainline and a somewhat complex switching track layout too. Sorry about not posting a picture, but I'm sensitive to copyright rules. Hope that might get you started with some possibilities.

Mark
Mark thanks for looking, when I asked for suggestions, I was not excepting someone to take the time to look for more than like 5 mins haha. Thank you though.

I will try and find a picture of the layout you have suggested that I check out. I do not have that book, but maybe someone has posted a picture of their own layout online that I could look at and see if it is something I want to pursue.

Thanks again
 
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