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First, let me say that at age 73 I am old and most of the time slow at getting things done! That being said, here is what happened yesterday:

I finally decided that I would just buy another locomotive off ebay that would allow me to swap out the shells and make the new one a Rock Island Line locomotive. So, made and offer on ebay and got the locomotive. Later in the day I sat down and started stripping the Rock Island shell in preperation for the change out. For some reason, it occurred to me to go to the area of the layout where the loco stopped moving and take a look. I went over there and with a high powered flashlight looked around. Low and behold, there, in the middle of the track, lay the missing drive gear! It was intact and looks like new! Now I had ran other trains over this area numerous times.

So, now I will reassemble the "Rock" locomotive and see if it will run. My concern is: what would be the best way to put the gear back on the motor shaft? Should I use a good superglue or a good epoxy? I haven't determined if the missing gear is metal or plastic, which I have to do.

I welcome any suggestions.
 

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If the fit is snug, I would use a CA glue after making certain it is absolutely sterile of any oil or grease.

I have found all sorts of parts on the tracks after I notice one missing. Buffers, grab irons, brake cylinders, etc. I really need to glue this stuff on the model after unboxing and before hitting the rails.
 

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Murphy's law

First, let me say that at age 73 I am old and most of the time slow at getting things done! That being said, here is what happened yesterday:

I finally decided that I would just buy another locomotive off ebay that would allow me to swap out the shells and make the new one a Rock Island Line locomotive. So, made and offer on ebay and got the locomotive. Later in the day I sat down and started stripping the Rock Island shell in preperation for the change out. For some reason, it occurred to me to go to the area of the layout where the loco stopped moving and take a look. I went over there and with a high powered flashlight looked around. Low and behold, there, in the middle of the track, lay the missing drive gear! It was intact and looks like new! Now I had ran other trains over this area numerous times.

So, now I will reassemble the "Rock" locomotive and see if it will run. My concern is: what would be the best way to put the gear back on the motor shaft? Should I use a good superglue or a good epoxy? I haven't determined if the missing gear is metal or plastic, which I have to do.

I welcome any suggestions.


HOFAN;

Your story is a familiar one, and also a perfect example of a corollary to Murphy's law that concerns lost items. It goes something like this.
"You can search as long as you want for a missing item. However, you will never find that item until after you have bought a replacement."

As for your How to attach the gear to the motor shaft question I agree with MichealE. Wipe the motor shaft with alcohol to remove any grease, oil, or dirt, and attach the gear with a single drop of super glue. Be very careful not to let any glue get into the motor or the bearing that holds the shaft.

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Before gluing, you might clean everything and do a test fit, don't force anything. If the fit is so snug that it won't slide one then you may need to heat the gear up and/or cool the engine down before putting the gear on. If its snug, then a drop of glue should do the trick. If its a really loose fit, even glue may not work because the surfaces are so worn. But others may have some good ideas about what to do with a really loose fit.
 

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I won't disagree with what had been said, but I would do things a little differently.

First, I'd score the centre of the shaft as carefully as possible, maybe with a tiny burr on a Dremel. This is to provide 'tooth' for any adhesive, no matter which you decide to use.

Secondly, I'd use a thin needle file and scrub up the inside of the gear a bit, not much...just make it a bit hairy.

Then, I'd wash everything with hot water and soap, dry well with clean cloths like painter's cloths made of bedsheet material. Let it dry.

Secondly, with that dual-plunger syringe of LePage's epoxy, I'd mix a very small dab...but mix it really well as epoxies must be...and then apply a bit of the compound around the CENTRE of the shaft. Then, when you apply the gear, and slide it into place, you won't have epoxy all over the place.

With a toothpick, add a wee bit on the opposite side of the gear toward which you slid the gear onto the shaft because that side will barely have come into contact with the epoxy.

You let this cure for at a minimum of 24 hours before you put the shaft into place and force the gear to accept torque.

Good luck.
 
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