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In the past I have only done black locomotives, mainly Southern units. Since I’ve came back into the hobby and modeling the original NS I have to mix my gray paint. I’ve never mixed paint for a model, and have a question about it.

I need to mix right at two ounces of the gray. It’s a mixture of 2 parts CSX gray to 1 part white. What would be the best way to do this?
 

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If you really need to do it by ounces, then get a small set of graduated measuring cups (Micromark sells them; probably a dozen other online retailers as well). Problem is that with a 3 part mix, it'll be tough to come out right at two ounces. With a known ratio and a fairly exact measurement system, you don't need to mix it all at once, because it's easy to reproduce, closely enough. Mix enough for one job (locomotive) at a time.

Two ounces is a LOT of paint, though. The typical model paint jar is only half that. If you just need to mix some paint, pipettes are a good solution. Count the drops of one and drops of the other into a clean, sealable container.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you really need to do it by ounces, then get a small set of graduated measuring cups (Micromark sells them; probably a dozen other online retailers as well). Problem is that with a 3 part mix, it'll be tough to come out right at two ounces. With a known ratio and a fairly exact measurement system, you don't need to mix it all at once, because it's easy to reproduce, closely enough. Mix enough for one job (locomotive) at a time.

Two ounces is a LOT of paint, though. The typical model paint jar is only half that. If you just need to mix some paint, pipettes are a good solution. Count the drops of one and drops of the other into a clean, sealable container.


So I’d need say two ounces of gray to one of white?


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