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Does anyone have any tips on modeling water to get a realistic look for water depth, etc. Everything I have seen has looked far from the real thing. Any ideas on what works AND what doesn't would be appreciated.
 

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Tip by Model Railroader

They had an article which basically you painted the water black with lighter colors around the edge to simulate depth. Then used Woodland Scenics Realistic Water. It dries flat then add Woodland Scenics Water effects to ripple.For water you can use acrylic medium gloss or acrylic gloss varnish. 2006 special issue Model Trains step by step. 8 easy layouts you can build.
 

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The procedure I had used seems to have a bit of realism and is simple. First, select the area and figure out the size of the water. Paint it with craft paint -By painting, you have control over the look and you can take in account for shallow areas (lighter blue) to deep areas (dark blue). Add shadows and coast lines. Next, apply a coat or two of clear coat or clear glue. While drying you can scratch waves or bunch up the glue creating a more real look.

It my new layout I will try some other ideas for water as this process lacks the depth that I was looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the replies. I'm almost looking for that lousy cold fridged weather to keep me inside and get going on my layout.
 

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I use EnviroTex 2 part clear epoxy casting resin. As already said, paint the water area darker in the middle and fading to lighter along the shore, add whatever rocks or stones or fallen tree branches you want then thoroughly stir parts A and B together and pour. No more than a 1/4 inch thick. Surface must be level before you pour or it will all run to the low side. End result will dry very high gloss and smooth like calm water. If you want waves, add Woodland Scenics water effects to make those.
 

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i used the craft water for plant displays from walmart, ten bucks... and was okay with how it turned out for me, shallow clear water, maybe only 1/8 inch single layer

trng 012.jpg
 

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Heres a couple of threads from the last year with ideas on modeling water -- with pictures.

http://www.modeltrainforum.com/showthread.php?t=22483

http://www.modeltrainforum.com/showthread.php?t=26032

You can probably find more if you use the search feature.

One caution with painting the bottom before adding the water product. Color selection is key to making realistic-looking water. Water is usually not blue. Deep lakes on a sunny day appear do appear blue because the scattered blue skylight reflects off of the water. On a cloudy day, they will appear more of a gray color -- reflecting the gray color of the clouds..

In shallow lakes and ponds, and in clear, fast-moving streams, the color of the bottom will be visible from the surface. The bottom of a lake is usually covered with sediment from soil and decomposing leaves that fall into the water -- more of a dark brown color.

Slow-moving streams are also more likely to have darkbrown sediments on the bottom.

The bottom of a clear, fast-moving stream is usually rocky and the color of the rocks will dominate -- usually a dark gray, but some rocks can be light gray, nearly black or even reddish, depending on what part of the country you are modeling.

In areas where the land is not rocky and soil erosion is common, moving water usually carries sediment which makes it brown or gray even a reddish brown tint, depending on the color of the surrounding soil that erodes into the river.

Search for pictures of rivers, streams, and waterfalls for color ideas. But remember that your view of your layout is from a "helicopter" viewpoint. Water looks much different when viewed from above as compared to being viewed form the shore (where most photographers stand).

When you paint the "bottom" of your river or lake, make the colors lighten gradually as you move close to shore. If your stream goes through a forest, add some fallen dead tree logs in the river for realism.
 

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I'll toss in my two cents.....
Three years ago I used a product called MAGIC WATER. It was super easy to use, didn't give off obnoxious odors or vapors, and dried hard as a rock within 48 hours to 72 hours.
Best part is that now, three years later, it still looks great. It hasn't turned yellow or cracked.
It's also easy to find on eBay, google, etc. at a reasonable price.
Good luck,
Bob
 

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around here water is mostly light greenish or brown, dirt runoff and sediment, mostly from farming, usual stuff .. when I did my pour I remembered the water up north near dawson city when i took a two week vacation a few years ago..not much dirt, lots of gravel, especially where they had dredged for gold, and water was pretty clear, with a light blue tinge, and my layout is supposed to be kinda up north in the bush anyways, so what the heck, :)
 

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M turn...

I read lots about modeling water before starting my practice run. It looks so simple on the internet videos, but I think one must be somewhat of an artist to pull it off. I've cut a piece of 1/4" plywood to fit my area for practice. My first attempts looked like a piece of plywood with sloppy paint on it.

I think I am about 50% happy with my work, next I'll try deeper layers of clear. Also need to finalize location of trestle bents and add more ripple there. (Not the wine.)
 

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Im attempting a pretty simple approach which has pretty good results IMO.
Simply layer glue and toilet paper in the area and use a brush to creat waves/ripples.
Paint it and then layer it with coats of water based clear. Little different than the epoxy method but the outcome is pretty impressive.

I'll see if i can find the video and post it.

Its from Marklin of Sweden


Sent from my LG-K550 using Tapatalk
 

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I read lots about modeling water before starting my practice run. It looks so simple on the internet videos, but I think one must be somewhat of an artist to pull it off. I've cut a piece of 1/4" plywood to fit my area for practice. My first attempts looked like a piece of plywood with sloppy paint on it.

I think I am about 50% happy with my work, next I'll try deeper layers of clear. Also need to finalize location of trestle bents and add more ripple there. (Not the wine.)
Well, Dennis, you're exactly right. Very few people are masters of any artistic technique right off the bat, no matter how much they read or study. How often have you watched someone demonstrate something, only to find it was nowhere near as easy when you tried it?

I don't think I was totally happy with my attempts at water until my 4th or 5th attempt. As with so many other things, practice makes perfect.

Howver, in my experience, more clear product doesn't do anything more than waste clear product. Too much clear product can result in a cloudy effect, which pretty much ruins it. It's all in the coloring and tinting.
 

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seen that one

I saw that video aand it looked to complicated for me.
 

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I saw that video aand it looked to complicated for me.
There is no magic product to great looking water. It takes work, no matter what you use.
 

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Im attempting a pretty simple approach which has pretty good results IMO.
Simply layer glue and toilet paper in the area and use a brush to creat waves/ripples.
Paint it and then layer it with coats of water based clear. Little different than the epoxy method but the outcome is pretty impressive.

I'll see if i can find the video and post it.

Its from Marklin of Sweden

https://youtu.be/2TwpB7sVMn8

Sent from my LG-K550 using Tapatalk
That looks awesome. I love that guy's videos... informational and very mellow/therapeutic to watch.
 
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