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Discussion Starter #1
I tried out my air brush for the first time today. The first thing I learned is the paint must be thinner. The next time I'll make sure the mix is a 30% paint 70% thinner. So I also added some decals. I guess it will pass for my first try.
George

soo_line_weathered_box.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What type and brand of paint are you using?
I used Model Master flat white enamel to dull the car before applying Model Master rust enamel. I thought I mixed it at around 30% paint 70% thinner but this was just a guess for the test run. Now that I know more about what I'm doing I'll be more accurate with the mixes. I just bought 12 empty 4oz mixing bottles for future projects.

George
 

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I think you did a great job on your first project. I have went back and forth on obtaining a airbrush setup. Once a person becomes polished at it you can really create some great looking pieces.

I am not sure if I have the patience for it or not but I have learned in life to never say never.
 

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Several years ago one of our members said he practiced with his new air brush by using food coloring and spraying on cardboard and paper, just to get the feel of the device and procedures. I thought that was a good idea. :thumbsup:

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Several years ago one of our members said he practiced with his new air brush by using food coloring and spraying on cardboard and paper, just to get the feel of the device and procedures. I thought that was a good idea.

Your right great idea. I did not want that much rust on the roof but I guess it worked out. To heavy handed on the paint control valve. A little practice with some food coloring would of helped a lot.

George
 

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Well, 70% thinner sounds like it will be a bit thin. Experiment with what works well with each jar/can that you open. The thinner it is the easier it is for it to run. Do strain the paint, always. I use a 150 micron strainer bought from a place that specializes in paint for autos.

This is based on my experience spraying polyurethane varnish on wood furniture for 40 some years. I am fairly new to airbrushing, but what I learned with my furniture seems to hold true for the airbrush: Shake the material that you are spraying well (I strap the paint container onto a sawzall blade with a hose clamp and run it for 5 minutes, this before adding thinner.) thin it and shake it again, filter it and then try it on a piece of cardboard. Maybe add more thinner...spray with 20 - 30 pounds pressure - you can experiment with the pressure too.

For cleanup - turn up the pressure, run thinner through, then take the gun apart and drop the parts carefully into a jar of thinner, slosh it around, dry everything with the air pressure, put it back together.

Tom McFadden - mcfaddenfurniture.com
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, 70% thinner sounds like it will be a bit thin. Experiment with what works well with each jar/can that you open. The thinner it is the easier it is for it to run. Do strain the paint, always. I use a 150 micron strainer bought from a place that specializes in paint for autos.
This is to emulate rust & road grim on a car Tom so a deluded mix of 70/30 is needed. This is only me first try at this so when I do accurate mixing in the future I'll let you know how it all works out.

George
 

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George is right. The art of airbrushing requires different mixes depending on what you're trying to do with the paint. For actual painting, I like it the consistency of 2% milk. For weathering, thinner is better.

Although having a dual action airbrush where you can control both airflow and paint flow is a good idea, too.
 

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Well done! Ive been using craft paints with good results mixing 3:2 paint to thinner.
 

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Your right great idea. I did not want that much rust on the roof but I guess it worked out. To heavy handed on the paint control valve. A little practice with some food coloring would of helped a lot.

George
Though I can't really see the roof that good, I think it looks good.
I guess the decals you mentioned are the graffiti?
How about an aerial shot of the roof?

I want to get into airbrush painting myself, I just wanted to show you that too much weathering may be alright. On the road when I deliver I see all kinds of train cars that look like they been sitting in a junk yard for 30 years. :)

This picture I did not take, I included it because of the all the rust on it.
b-60-1991.jpg

Believe it or not this is a food grade tank car. ha ha ha I guess the inside is Kosher? :p

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So sometimes too much is good, all depends on your personal taste too.
If you like graffiti it can never be over done, check out this box car.

P8230022.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Nice photos ED. You maybe right but that's not the kind of roof I wanted for the car. You pull back on the paint control valve to hard and you just aged the car 30 years. So I need more practice. I want to draw the graffiti right on the car without any decals. We'll see how that works out. More practice.

George
 

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You pull back on the paint control valve to hard and you just aged the car 30 years. So I need more practice.
Well, practice does improve any skill, but having your paint properly thinned for the job goes a long way towards getting it right as well.

I want to draw the graffiti right on the car without any decals. We'll see how that works out. More practice.

George
Due to the scale involved, a bristle brush is probably a better bet for that kind of graffiti than an air brush. At least, it would be for me.
 
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