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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
When printing 1:1, be sure to check a pre-known piece for length. So if a piece is supposed to be 9.25 inches long, print the page that piece is on, and measure the piece. I ran into issues where Adobe was compressing the print size. I wasted a lot of paper until I figured that out.

Regarding tracing ... I did my layout on foam. I just took a pencil and gauged the centerline of the track, taking care to mark key junction points like the location of turnouts, and other key geometric pieces like crossings and bridge abutments. I used a sharpie to make marks where those key pieces started and stopped, then just made a gouge a long the centerline.

Then I used the sharpie to trace the centerline. Laying cork roadbed is pretty simple when you have a traced centerline to follow. You can even deviate a bit here and there, and hoc.
Jeff thank you so much! This will become invaluable to me when I get to that stage. And I'm sure I'll have more questions for you on this subject in the future ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 · (Edited)
Well after researching most of last night and again this morning on prototypical Railroad Terminals/Switching Yards, I finally was able to get over the hurdle of trying to visualize the left side of the layout. Which will now become the "East Yard" or the town of Willow. (Name after my White Lab) ;)
So this afternoon, I got back to work on AnyRail and was able to finish the West Yard. I'm pretty satisfied with the outcome. To me it resembles a small prototypical switching yard.

Let me know what you fine folks think.

I only posted the left side of the layout this time because the right side is now under redevelopment as far as the main yard goes, or what will become the "Wast Yard" . :sneaky:

Thanks again for all the help I have received thus far and for the kind words,
SideTrack Hobo

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
I’m a bit surprised that no one has mentioned “s” curves. I count ten of them. Hmmmm
I think someone did....you just did! 😁

Are the "s" cuurves a problem?

Here where I live, the railroad has many "s" turns. It is a hilly region and the rail tracks follow the contour of them are in some cases cut right through the hills.

I also think that it looks nice to see a train meander around turns as opposed to running in straight lines all the time.
To me, it's very appealing and pleasant to watch. 😉

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Ya anyrail can get frustrating sitting long periods of time trying to get that track plan. The most frustrating part is when you go to line up track and the program just wants to make a sharp bend instead of being smooth. Even hitting the smooth button don't fix....
 

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IMO S curves are only a problem when 1, they are abrupt and/or small radius, and 2 long wheelbase cars are involved.
Short cars should have no problem. If long cars will be present, a short tangent (straight) section mid-curve solves things.
Also IMO folks treat S curves as a sort of boogey man. They're over-feared.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Ya anyrail can get frustrating sitting long periods of time trying to get that track plan. The most frustrating part is when you go to line up track and the program just wants to make a sharp bend instead of being smooth. Even hitting the smooth button don't fix....
It's a pretty good CAD program, but it does get frustrating at times. Luckily for me I got pretty good at it over the last month are so lol.
I also finally got use to which way to move those little cross hairs within the track. Man was that a real learning curve pain in the butt! 😁

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Yes I do have Peco flex track and some RH & LH Peco large radius turnouts. I thought about just pinning the yard sections down with tee pins to a 4x8 1/2" piece of foam board that I having laying around, just to get the feel for it.
What I'm trying to figure out now is what minimum size radius divergent track to use on the large radius turnouts for the run-a-around track inside the yard, and still keep a 2" (center to center) distance between tracks. It will be a small switcher engine, like a SD40-2 or a EMD GP60, that will work the yard,.
So I'm thinking a minimum radius like 9 1/2" should be fine for a Locomotive to traverse through the yard at 5 to 10 mph.
How does that sound?

SideTrack Hobo
SideTrack Hobo;

There is nothing "small" about an SD40-2 . That's a pretty long, six-axle diesel road locomotive.

I don't recommend 9-1/2" radius curves at all. They are the very tight equivalent to an 18" radius curve in HO.
I originally adopted 12" as the minimum radius curve on my N-scale layout. My thinking was that any N-scale equipment could make it through an 11" radius curve, so 12" was a slam dunk. Wrong. When I bought a pair of Kato's 2-8-2 Mikado steam locomotives, they did not like my 12" radius curves very much. Yes, they could make it through those curves, sometimes. But they derailed many time too. I did some real world testing and found that 16" was the smallest radius where the Mikados stayed on the track reliably, time after time. This despite Kato's recommended minimum radius of 11" for these locomotives.

In the model world, going way too fast is likely to have your locomotive fall on its side. However, going very slow is not a substitute for good track planning and tracklaying. A prototype locomotive can often negotiate some track that's in pretty lousy condition, but the fact that it weighs hundreds of tons is a big help.

With today's N-scale locomotives, using 128 speed step DCC, five scale miles per hour is probably possible.
I remember early N-scale locos that couldn't begin to even get close to that low a speed without stopping.
Still, I recommend being conservative, and designing all the reliability into your track that you possibly can. That translates into no sharp curves. No small frog # turnouts. No "snake trail" routes through a yard ladder. And very careful tracklaying.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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I'm sure it will take just bit of paper and few strips of scotch tape! :ROFLMAO:
I do plan on printing out a 1:1 layout soon. Just to see what it will look like, life size.
This brings me to another question, :unsure:
Once I do print it out in 1:1 and tape it together, what is the best method to tracing it out onto the bench work through the printed paper?
Any recommended thoughts ? (Do's and don'ts) lol

SideTrack Hobo
I suggest taping it firmly down to the foam, and then using a sewing tool called a "pounce wheel" to trace the track lines through the paper plan and onto the foam. A pounce wheel looks like a miniature version of a cowboy's spur, mounted on a metal stick. As you trace the track pattern, the sharp ends of the "spur" poke through the plan and make tiny holes in the surface of the foam, or even plywood, if you press harder. A seamstress uses the wheel in much the same way, tracing a paper clothing pattern's lines onto cloth. A fabric store might have this tool, or you can order one from www.micromark.com

Traction Fan
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
There is nothing "small" about an SD40-2 . That's a pretty long, six-axle diesel road locomotive.
What would you suggest is a good switcher engine for yard work, declassification and classification of trains?

I don't recommend 9-1/2" radius curves at all.
All the curves on the main line have minumum radius of 18". Some of the curves are as much as 24".

In the yards, there is a minimum radius of 12", with some being 14".

No small frog # turnouts. No "snake trail" routes through a yard ladder.
Every turnout on the mainline and in both yards are Peco code 80 stream line electrofrog large radius turnouts.
The Wye is a Peco electrofrog medium radius.

Thank you Traction Fan,
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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
I suggest taping it firmly down to the foam, and then using a sewing tool called a "pounce wheel" to trace the track lines through the paper plan and onto the foam. A pounce wheel looks like a miniature version of a cowboy's spur, mounted on a metal stick. As you trace the track pattern, the sharp ends of the "spur" poke through the plan and make tiny holes in the surface of the foam, or even plywood, if you press harder. A seamstress uses the wheel in much the same way, tracing a paper clothing pattern's lines onto cloth. A fabric store might have this tool, or you can order one from www.micromark.com


Traction Fan
This is a great idea TractionFan!
I don't know why I didn't think of this lol. My wife has one that she uses to trace clothing patterns onto fabric with occasionally.

Thank you so much!

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Yes. Meandering curves along the main lines are a fine thing indeed. Flex track’s great for that!
However. Tight S curves in tight places (especially yard tracks and WYEs) with Turnouts also in the mix make for some eminent issues when backing up trains through them. Unless of course the track is perfectly laid and, all rolling stock is in perfect gauge. Couplers perfectly set too. No truck mounted ones either, problems galore there. I suggest a search here of other threads on the subject. Undoubtedly, others will chime in with further points of view on the subject. Good luck & keep it fun.
 

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Broad S curves are fine.

I'd go with a GP40-2 or GP38-2. Both were among the most numerous produced, and always got pushed into local & yard service as they got gradually replaced by newer equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Broad S curves are fine.

I'd go with a GP40-2 or GP38-2. Both were among the most numerous produced, and always got pushed into local & yard service as they got gradually replaced by newer equipment.
That sounds great OilValleyRy!
Thank you,

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Discussion Starter · #80 · (Edited)
Well, here is the layout plan including the newly redeveloped main yard on the left side. I redesigned the main yard which is now the East Yard.
I also moved some of the industries around and now there is plenty of room for an industrial park on the lower left side.
There is also plenty more room now for open green spaces for scenery. I think this will separate the towns more with hills and forest in-between them.
I really do like the flow of this draft much better and it was made possible with the help of all of you who have made great suggestions.

Your knowledge has been a tremendous help to me.
Let me know what you fine folks think.

Thanks again,
SideTrack Hobo

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