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Yes, the manufacturer and kit name are in the posts.

I bought a Walther's kit that had 13 plastic structure kits included in the box. 12 of them are buildings like you might find in a large rural county seat. The 13th kit was a small industrial building that is a transfer station, sort of like a cross dock warehouse served by rail and road. I bought it second hand, with six of the structures already built. I built the rest and painted them.

That kit did a good job of providing the heart of the town, but I needed houses and smaller buildings to round out the town.

I like American Model Builders and also Blair Line for laser cut wood kits. I haven't tried too many other manufacturers.

I have bought from several online retailers like Hobbylink, Midwest Model Railroad, Yankee Dabbler, etc.
Jeff;

Here's a list of N-scale houses. Hopefully you will find some to complete your town.

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Also when I go to put track down or before on the benchwork. Do most people paint the plywood? Or use foam and do scenery on the foam? Maybe some good videos on this subject if someone knows of some good ones.
 

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Also when I go to put track down or before on the benchwork. Do most people paint the plywood? Or use foam and do scenery on the foam? Maybe some good videos on this subject if someone knows of some good ones.
I recommend painting the plywood, or the foam before laying track. You may also want to paint the track itself. Commercial track usually has very shiny silver rails on very shiny black or brown plastic ties. Spray painting the track with a can of flat rusty brown primer will improve the appearance of the track a lot. You can get Krylon, or Rustoleum spray primer at Home Depot, Lowes, or Walmart. For painting your plywood or foam get some "dirt brown color" flat latex interior house paint. Check at Home Depot, or Lowes for discounted unwanted paints that someone had mixed, and then didn't like the color. The stores usually have some of these around at reduced prices. Raw plywood, or the pink, blue, or green extruded foam, don't resemble anything in nature, so painting them to look like dirt make sense.

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Yes, the manufacturer and kit name are in the posts.

I bought a Walther's kit that had 13 plastic structure kits included in the box. 12 of them are buildings like you might find in a large rural county seat. The 13th kit was a small industrial building that is a transfer station, sort of like a cross dock warehouse served by rail and road. I bought it second hand, with six of the structures already built. I built the rest and painted them.

That kit did a good job of providing the heart of the town, but I needed houses and smaller buildings to round out the town.

I like American Model Builders and also Blair Line for laser cut wood kits. I haven't tried too many other manufacturers.

I have bought from several online retailers like Hobbylink, Midwest Model Railroad, Yankee Dabbler, etc.
I should be getting the book soon on modeling the 1950's. Any insight on models and even what trains fit this time frame? Could even go up into the 60's. So a mixture of some steam and diesel I am guessing.
 

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Sony's Filling Station was a fun build.

Next up is the N Scale Sonny's Super Service Pre-Fab Building Kit by Woodland Scenics for $23.39 (their pic below). This kit is 鈥減re-fabbed鈥 but does require assembly. It is plastic and was simple to build. It contains a LOT of small details, including everything you see in the picture except the vehicles, and trees and shrubs. The small details were fun to add to the building. All the small details attach to the building except for the stand-alone sign you see in the foreground by the tan & brown vehicle. It also came with dry-transfer decals of which, most are left over when done, as there is only room for so many. Some of the details included: A motorcycle that leans up against the side of the building. A couple pallets of stuff that end up along the back side of the building. Watering can and bucket with a hose coiled up that hangs on the back side. A plie of tires. Ice Machine, Soda Pop Machine, Propane Tank, trash cans, etc. This was a fun kit to assemble with good directions. Lots of small parts (all the accessories). Overall, I am happy with this kit. It was relatively simple to put together, and has a lot of cool little details
 

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I recommend painting the plywood, or the foam before laying track. You may also want to paint the track itself. Commercial track usually has very shiny silver rails on very shiny black or brown plastic ties. Spray painting the track with a can of flat rusty brown primer will improve the appearance of the track a lot. You can get Krylon, or Rustoleum spray primer at Home Depot, Lowes, or Walmart. For painting your plywood or foam get some "dirt brown color" flat latex interior house paint. Check at Home Depot, or Lowes for discounted unwanted paints that someone had mixed, and then didn't like the color. The stores usually have some of these around at reduced prices. Raw plywood, or the pink, blue, or green extruded foam, don't resemble anything in nature, so painting them to look like dirt make sense.

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Definitely pre paint the ties and rails. And put the rust on the the rails too. I don't have much experience, so I did my track weathering in situ, doable but I could see benefits of pre finishing.
As far as how prefinishing affects the soldering process I don't know, but I'm sure there is a work around.

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Definitely pre paint the ties and rails. And put the rust on the the rails too. I don't have much experience, so I did my track weathering in situ, doable but I could see benefits of pre finishing.
As far as how prefinishing affects the soldering process I don't know, but I'm sure there is a work around.

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As mentioned, the entire pieces of track can be spray painted.
For rails to solder, they need to be clean, bare, metal, so you will need to sand/file off a bit of paint in the area to be soldered.
I use a 30 watt soldering iron, water-based flux, and 60/40 rosin core solder. Before, and during, soldering, apply paper towels, wet with cold water, over the track on either side of the soldering area. These will act as heat sinks, to protect the plastic ties from melting.

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Many many years ago in one of the many many Kalmbach books was an N scale layout on a door called Mohawk Valley. It lacked a turntable but a door is typically 6 foot, so a 2 foot addition could accommodate that.
Interestingly, that layout represented Canajohaire NY, which I since stopped in without realizing the connection at first. When it clicked in my head, I walked up to the bridge over the Amtrak & ex-Conrail mainlines, and I swear to god I felt like a plastic figure resting on a giant door. It was just surreal. I looked to the sky for a gargantuan camera man, I kid you not. A real twilight zone moment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Many many years ago in one of the many many Kalmbach books was an N scale layout on a door called Mohawk Valley. It lacked a turntable but a door is typically 6 foot, so a 2 foot addition could accommodate that.
Interestingly, that layout represented Canajohaire NY, which I since stopped in without realizing the connection at first. When it clicked in my head, I walked up to the bridge over the Amtrak & ex-Conrail mainlines, and I swear to god I felt like a plastic figure resting on a giant door. It was just surreal. I looked to the sky for a gargantuan camera man, I kid you not. A real twilight zone moment.
Do you by any chance remember what book? Was it one of the magazines?
 

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Do you by any chance remember what book? Was it one of the magazines?
It was originally printed in Model Railroader magazine around 1992-94 I believe. Since reprinted in a Kalmbach book, maybe one titled 鈥渟mall layouts you can build鈥 or something like that. I believe, although could be mistaken, that the 鈥渓ayout book鈥 had it on the cover. I was to say that book was from around鈥2000-2002 but I鈥檓 just guessing. My bean counter short changes me a lot these days Lol
I googled it hoping to find it but only seeing search returns for a different layout of the same name. If I find it I鈥檒l link it, or if I can locate that book.

EDIT: I did find Dave Vollmer鈥檚 layout which appears to be a modified version of the same plan. The roadways are slightly different & he added a yard addition on one end, essentially what I was suggesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
It was originally printed in Model Railroader magazine around 1992-94 I believe. Since reprinted in a Kalmbach book, maybe one titled 鈥渟mall layouts you can build鈥 or something like that. I believe, although could be mistaken, that the 鈥渓ayout book鈥 had it on the cover. I was to say that book was from around鈥2000-2002 but I鈥檓 just guessing. My bean counter short changes me a lot these days Lol
I googled it hoping to find it but only seeing search returns for a different layout of the same name. If I find it I鈥檒l link it, or if I can locate that book.

EDIT: I did find Dave Vollmer鈥檚 layout which appears to be a modified version of the same plan. The roadways are slightly different & he added a yard addition on one end, essentially what I was suggesting.
Thank you for sharing, The entire thing would be too big for me of course.
 

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Many many years ago in one of the many many Kalmbach books was an N scale layout on a door called Mohawk Valley. It lacked a turntable but a door is typically 6 foot, so a 2 foot addition could accommodate that.
Interestingly, that layout represented Canajohaire NY, which I since stopped in without realizing the connection at first. When it clicked in my head, I walked up to the bridge over the Amtrak & ex-Conrail mainlines, and I swear to god I felt like a plastic figure resting on a giant door. It was just surreal. I looked to the sky for a gargantuan camera man, I kid you not. A real twilight zone moment.
Standard doors are 6'-8" so if the 2' extension were added, you would even have a little more room for the turntable. Or the extension could just be shortened 8", to make the overall length of the layout 8 feet. There is a neat little N-scale door layout called, "The EZ & Quick" in the old 1970s Kalmbach book, "N-scale Primer." No turntable, though there's room to add one. Also a simpler track plan, though perhaps worth a look. The track used was Arnold Rapido sectional track & turnouts which were lousy, (steel rail if I remember correctly) and are mercifully long out of production. I once built the layout, with Atlas sectional track & turnouts. I gave it to my nephew for christmas many years ago.

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Standard doors are 6'-8" so if the 2' extension were added, you would even have a little more room for the turntable. Or the extension could just be shortened 8", to make the overall length of the layout 8 feet. There is a neat little N-scale door layout called, "The EZ & Quick" in the old 1970s Kalmbach book, "N-scale Primer." No turntable, though there's room to add one. Also a simpler track plan, though perhaps worth a look. The track used was Arnold Rapido sectional track & turnouts which were lousy, (steel rail if I remember correctly) and are mercifully long out of production. I once built the layout, with Atlas sectional track & turnouts. I gave it to my nephew for christmas many years ago.

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Cool thanks, Believe it or not I found a copy of the book N Scale primer on Amazon and only 2.33 for the price. So I will get a chance to see the plans for myself. Wish they had a lot of these old model railroaders online to be able to read.
 

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Cool thanks, Believe it or not I found a copy of the book N Scale primer on Amazon and only 2.33 for the price. So I will get a chance to see the plans for myself. Wish they had a lot of these old model railroaders online to be able to read.
You may want to use a trick that I did on any layout you build with sectional track. When you build a curve from Atlas sections use a 19' radius section (or two) at each end of the curve. For the middle, main, part of the curve use 11" radius curved sections. I suggest not using any 9-3/4" radius sections since they are very tight curves. Even better, use flex track instead of sectional track, and Peco turnouts instead of Atlas turnouts.
The only type of Atlas turnouts available in N-scale are the somewhat infamous "Snap Switches" and they are very poorly made, & highly temperamental, often causing derailments.
Peco turnouts, are just the opposite. Very well made, and highly reliable. They seldom, if ever, cause any derailments.
If you already have a bunch of Atlas turnouts, you can improve their performance quite a bit by doing the modifications in the files below. Even with the improvements though, the Atlas will not be as good as the Peco.
Use a 36" wide door, if you possibly can. Standard doors are all the same height/length (6'-8") but come in 30", 32", 34" & 36" widths. Give yourself as much layout room as you can. Also use a hollow-core door. These are much, much, lighter weight than solid-core doors, and less expensive too.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
You may want to use a trick that I did on any layout you build with sectional track. When you build a curve from Atlas sections use a 19' radius section (or two) at each end of the curve. For the middle, main, part of the curve use 11" radius curved sections. I suggest not using any 9-3/4" radius sections since they are very tight curves. Even better, use flex track instead of sectional track, and Peco turnouts instead of Atlas turnouts.
The only type of Atlas turnouts available in N-scale are the somewhat infamous "Snap Switches" and they are very poorly made, & highly temperamental, often causing derailments.
Peco turnouts, are just the opposite. Very well made, and highly reliable. They seldom, if ever, cause any derailments.
If you already have a bunch of Atlas turnouts, you can improve their performance quite a bit by doing the modifications in the files below. Even with the improvements though, the Atlas will not be as good as the Peco.
Use a 36" wide door, if you possibly can. Standard doors are all the same height/length (6'-8") but come in 30", 32", 34" & 36" widths. Give yourself as much layout room as you can. Also use a hollow-core door. These are much, much, lighter weight than solid-core doors, and less expensive too.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

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Okay I am going to be using Kato switches, Was told by a few people about Atlas switches. Going to make some benchwork to hold this layout. Just used a door as more of a size reference.
 

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Thank you for sharing, The entire thing would be too big for me of course.
MR has their entire track plan database online, but it's only accessible to subscribers.
 

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Okay I am going to be using Kato switches, Was told by a few people about Atlas switches. Going to make some benchwork to hold this layout. Just used a door as more of a size reference.
OK, if you plan to use Kato switches/turnouts then I assume you are going to use Kato track with them. That's a good option. Many members here use Kato Unitrack and turnouts. Kato products are noted for their high quality and the Unitrack system is very popular here. While I have not personally used it, all I hear about it is very favorable.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
OK, if you plan to use Kato switches/turnouts then I assume you are going to use Kato track with them. That's a good option. Many members here use Kato Unitrack and turnouts.

Good Luck & Have Fun;

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Yes as far as I know Kato and peco are the only real options for decent turnouts switches
 

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Are they real and decent track plans? Do they have copies set in Anyrail but guessing that would be asking a lot.
No... they are not track plans per se, but layouts. And they are PDFs. While they all have descriptions (minimum turnout number, min curve radius, max grade,etc), you would have to reproduce it in Anyrail. I have done this (see post #6 in this thread: A Collection of Track Plans ).

But, they are all quality layouts, designed with purpose and a specific plan of operations in mind, not just ones thrown together for the sake of marketing.
 
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