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So I'm starting to build a 2x14 foot layout and want to make it modular in case I ever want to move it, transport it, etc.

I'm looking for ideas on how to hide the line between modules. I though of making the separation between modules not

a straight line, maybe a curve, or zig zag, but that complicates the framework. Thinking of line being hidden by a tree line,

or hedgerow, or a creek bed. Any ideas?
 

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So I'm starting to build a 2x14 foot layout and want to make it modular in case I ever want to move it, transport it, etc.

I'm looking for ideas on how to hide the line between modules. I though of making the separation between modules not

a straight line, maybe a curve, or zig zag, but that complicates the framework. Thinking of line being hidden by a tree line,

or hedgerow, or a creek bed. Any ideas?
depending on your choice of scenery;(countryside, mountain, city) you could have separately applied hedgerow/treeline or stone fence or roadway/street, row of buildings. maybe a dry creekbed?
 

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A lot depends on how much a slight “seam“ will bother you, the owner. My layout was built in 14 modules. The module joints in yard areas and along multitrack mainlines are invisible because the ballast hides them very effectively. The joints in roadways are visible but do not catch your eye when operating the layout. The joints in sceniced elements are visible but only when looking at them straight on. Moving one foot to either side of the joint makes them disappear because of the short height of the ground cover. The lighting intensity makes a big difference as well. So far no visitor to the layout has noticed the joints until after I point them out.
The bigger issue in my experience for a modular layout that is to be frequently disassembled is the wiring. Just track power is easy. If there are a lot of accessories, signals and controls this needs to be well planned.
This layout is not intended to be disassembled periodically for shows or traveling displays. It would only be disassembled for moving if I were to relocate. The layout was built remotely and reassembled in this room.
Here are some pictures That might help visualize the level of visibility.
In the first picture the joint is right in front of the Entemann’s truck, I have a bright LED shining directly on the joint to make it visible to the camera.
In the second picture the joint runs right in the center of the picture from top to bottom Note the tree stump near the top. These are used as “lifting lugs.”
The third picture is with that piece of scenery removed to expose hidden track for cleaning.


2F603387-0AC8-4C89-9FCF-77C2E673C731.jpeg
1752B235-6989-4AED-9EBA-66207DC2EACB.jpeg
3510DC0B-4DED-491F-BBE0-D252479BB51F.jpeg
 

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One technique I have seen is to use a piece of plaster cloth. Attach it to one of the modules so that it overlaps the other, but don't connect it to the other (unless you plan on the layout staying put for a while). Put scenery on that. It's easier to hide the edge of a piece of plaster cloth than a gap.

Also, make sure your modules fit together very tightly. That will minimize the appearance of the seam.
 

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CTV's suggestion is probably the best way to break up the straight line seam. Problem is it's a little fragile if your going to be breaking the tables down often, like hauling to shows. If your just planning the occasional move around the house it would be your best bet.
I have a 2' square liftout in the middle of my layout done that way and it is near invisible. (y)
 
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