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My old friend Joe went to the big layout in the sky and his daughter gave me a wealth of his kits that he never built but stashed away. They are the old time variety from back in the 60s. Most are wood, android, silver streak and other brands I don't recognize. We were together with two other buddies in a layout back about 1960. I'm now 78 and all these guys I hobbied with are now gone. I didn't stay with the hobby but Joe did. I'm way behind the times and all I have left to start building is a moto tool and an exacto knife. I have no clue what type of glue to use. Going through the box of kits I saw the one I want to start on, a Silver Streak Southern Pacific Caboose. I'm not sure if its a bay window or standard. I haven't looked that close. We used Duco and Android glue back in my day but that is ancient history. Any ideas on what I need to buy to complete this first kit would be appreciated. There are also some engine kits in the mix. I'll report more on this treasure later.

Joe had a ton of HO wood buildings along with some dioramas and I'm trying to get the family to donate them to a club that displays to the public so everyone can enjoy them.
 

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For gluing wood to wood, Titebond yellow wood glue is my favorite.


For bonding dissimilar materials, I still like epoxy. A lot of people use CA (Superglue) for that, but I don't like the fumes, and it's too easy to glue your fingers to something you don't want your fingers glued to. Plastic depends on the type of plastic, but for most model plastic I like Testors liquid model cement. The stuff in the orange tube is good for an extremely strong joint on thicker plastic. I've never had good luck with PlasticWeld cements.
 

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Well, for wood kits I would use an Elmer's type glue. Probably their construction adhesive, but you might get away with using their regular old white glue too. That dries clear, but is not as strong as the construction adhesive. The problem with the construction adhesive is that it dries yellow so you have to be careful as seams and joints so it doesn't squeeze out when joining parts.

Another thing about any Elmer's type glue is that you cannot stain over it, but it will take paint.

For plastics, a use Tamiya liquid glue. It comes in a bottle with a brush and is extremely thin and uses a capillary action to seep into close joints. It's disadvantage is that it has a very short working time measured in seconds. It is not gap-filling and the pieces must be closely fit. I also use Testor's tube cement when I need a longer working time or there are minute gaps in the plastic.

I use the liquid cement for adjoining wall sections and walls to the structural base. I also use it for grab irons and hand railings on coaches, as well as repairs for reattaching buffers, and small truck bolster parts that eventually always seem to fall off in operation. They are only a press-fit from the factory.

CA or 'Super Glue' can be used on tight fitting joints too as it also uses a capillary action and is pulled into the joint. I use CA glue mostly for small detail parts and parts without any stress like downspouts, chimneys, and such. This adhesive will craze plastic and leave a white residue so care must be taken with application.
 

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Duco used to be a favorite with glue sniffers...I guess that may have died down for a while now... 🤣
 

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I think you mean Ambroid, not android. Though in these digital times and Star Trek characters it's quite understandable !!
 

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Have a look at Aleene's Tacky Glue. It is basically white glue, but much thicker so it has a strong initial tack to minimize the need for clamping. Speaking of which, you'll also want a good supply of clamps, miniature files, and maybe a good cutting mat.

MicroMark is a purveyor of all kinds of hobby tools. Give them a look: www.micromark.com

But have someone else hold your credit card while you do. Shopping there can get expensive fast!
 
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