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Here are some photos of the benches, desk and shelf I made for the model. These are also in the prototype. I made the desk using a small piece of scrap wood that I shaped on the belt sander, and drilled a small ink well hole, and scribed a pencil slot, (barely visible). The benches and shelf are from left over material from the model kit. I also used some of this material to trim the inside of the windows, which does not come with the kit. I'm waiting for the stove, and with all the snow, we haven't had mail delivery since Monday.
Don
Switchman Shanty Assembly Benches desk shelf 001.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Benches desk shelf 002.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Benches desk shelf 003.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Benches desk shelf 004.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Benches desk shelf 005.jpg
 

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Don I remember your pictures from the prototype and you have really nailed it with this model. Love the desk and benches, I immediately saw the prototype in them.
 

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The real one (nor the model) don't seem big enough for all the furniture and a stove! Once the stove warmed up the concrete, it must have been like a furnace inside. Really like that wall mounted desk!:appl: If you had a 3d printer you could have spent hours trying to generate a model for the printer and probably never get the brackets right!
 

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Lemonhawk,
Here are some pics with the stove in place. I ordered an S scale stove, and I'm glad I did, because it's perfect for the shanty. Believe it or not, everything does fit nicely in the prototype. These stoves came in a multitude of styles and sizes to fit the needs of a particular room or building. The stove and pipe are only temporarily in place for photo purposes. I'll have some more when all the touch ups are done. I wanted to have it ready for our meeting tomorrow night.
To make the pipe sections, I used a piece of approximately 1/16" steel rod from a flag we use to mark the sprinkler heads on our fields. I took the aluminum seal top from a can of iced tea, and used a wood spatula to massage the material flat and smooth. Then after determining the correct size, I cut scale two foot sections, and used a small paper clip to crease the foil near the end to produce the ring around the end of the pipe. This is to add stiffness to the pipe. To make the elbows, I cut short pieces, and cut a V into one end, and rolled it around the wire. Each section is attached to the wire with CA. To make the cap, I used a piece of 1/8" rod as the form, as photos of the prototype I've seen show an outer pipe over the stove pipe. This I assume was to cover the opening for the pipe. To make the cap, I traced a circle on the foil, then cut out a small triangle and closed the gap until the edges alingn. This is the same method in the 12" t0 the foot world. I used CA to glue the over lapped seam, then glued the cap to the outer pipe. this I did after these pics were taken, as I wanted to make use of the natural light.
Don
 

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Don I remember your pictures from the prototype and you have really nailed it with this model. Love the desk and benches, I immediately saw the prototype in them.
Thank you, I'm trying to make the model as close to the shanty as possible. I'm going to try to get a forced perspective shot at the park with the two together. That will have to wait until the snow melts!
Don
 

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Remember you can focus stack the forced perspective shots so all will be in focus, you just need a camera that can manually focus and fits on a tripod. See Helicon Software, they have a free version. You can achieve an amazing depth of field, you will impress yourself - everyone else will just think it's a normal shot! I stacked 50 images taken at various focal points of a short HO train and it's in focus from an inch to 15 ft where it's outside the window.
 

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Remember you can focus stack the forced perspective shots so all will be in focus, you just need a camera that can manually focus and fits on a tripod. See Helicon Software, they have a free version. You can achieve an amazing depth of field, you will impress yourself - everyone else will just think it's a normal shot! I stacked 50 images taken at various focal points of a short HO train and it's in focus from an inch to 15 ft where it's outside the window.
I've done a few shots in the past when I was photographing a 2 bay hopper fro club car project on another forum. I used the Huber Breaker as the back drop, and lined the tracks the cars was on with the tracks in the background, and it came out well. It's just too bad the breaker was in such bad shape. Thanks for the pointers, I'll check it out.
Don
 

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You could just about set that anywhere near the tracks and make a story about why its there! Great looking model!
Thanks Lemonhawk. If there wasn't so much snow and slop on the ground, I'd shoot some photos at the park this afternoon. We have a preservation society meeting tonight, so I'll take it to show the members.
Don
 

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I made an escutcheon plate and door knob from a brass rod. For the knob, I used a file to make the profile. I wanted it smaller, but it separated before I could get it any smaller. The escutcheon is from the same rod; I hammered it into a thin strip, then cut out the size I wanted. I may re do the knob, as it's a little to big. I'll try a brass brad nail. I forgot that I have some in the shop.
Switchman Shanty Assembly Door 001.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Door 004.jpg
I also made a desk phone from a piece of composite deck material. It's easy to machine, and it has a semi- hard and smooth finish. For the receiver, I used a paper clip. I think it too is a bit large, so I have some finer and softer craft wire that I'll try. For the cord, I'm going to use some very fine craft wire, or possibly a single strand of electrical wire. I was thinking of coiling it around a thin rod, (less then 1/32" dia), but coiled cords came a bit later then the time period I want to model. For the dial, I used a thin plastic lid, and used two tiny washers and drew around the inside with a black ink pen, the used a sharpened paneling nail to pierce the rotary dial holes.

Switchman Shanty Assembly Phone 004.jpg
Here is a photo of the completed phone. Someone on another forum wanted a reference for size, so I used the tape measure. I didn't want to waste another post for a few pics, so having time left, I added to this post. Next project is a coal scuttle. I'm using a foil lid from an iced tea container.
Don
Switchman Shanty Assembly Phone 001.jpg
Switchman Shanty Assembly Phone 002.jpg
Switchman Shanty Assembly Phone 003.jpg
 

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I finished all the items for the inside of the shanty. I made a coal scuttle and shovel/scoop, and a broom and dustpan along with the phone. I'm not going to attempt a coffee pot, I'll pick one up at York. I will have the shanty and items with me whichever day I get there, plans may change again!
The broom was made with some bristles from a wood scrub brush, red thread and a strand of telephone wire. I used a coffee stir straw to hold the bristles and tooth pic handle together until the urethane dried, then wrapped the thread around the bristles. After the glue holding the thread dried, I wrapped the wire around the shoulder and handle. The larger broom was my first attempt, but I realized it was too big.
The coal scuttle is made from the foil from an iced tea lid, as is the dustpan and coal shovel.
Don
Switchman Shanty Assermbly Broom 001.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assermbly Broom 002.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assermbly Broom 003.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assermbly Broom 004.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assermbly Broom 005.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assermbly Broom 006.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Caol Scuttle 001.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Caol Scuttle 002.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Caol Scuttle 003.jpg

Switchman Shanty Assembly Caol Scuttle 004.jpg
 

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Making board lines on a single piece of wood.

Several years ago, I was asked to come up with some MOW load ideas by a friend. One of the loads included a wood crate, ties and ballast. I wanted the crate to have the appearance of being constructed of individual boards. I devised a simple jig to accomplish this using 2 pieces of 1/2" plastic and some paneling nails.
I first determined the size of the crate; I was making the loads for a Weaver wood side flatcar/gondola conversion, so i made the crate to fit between the side walls. I wanted it to be slightly higher then the sides for visual purposes.
I needed a way to replicate the boards without having to use individual pieces, so I used a scrap piece of 1/2" plastic sheathing for a base, (any smooth material will work), and a smaller piece for a guide attached to one edge of the base. I then determined how wide I wanted the boards to be, in this case, approximately 6". I marked the board lines on the base at both ends, and drew lines along the length starting from the guide. 1/8" represents a scale 1/48 6" board. Next, I pre-drilled holes in a V pattern on each of the lines. Using 1" paneling nails, I drove them into the base until the points just barely protruded above the surface. I used white pine for the crate sides, and mitered the corners. I made a gluing jig out of scrap plexiglass to hold the sides together during the gluing. My boxes are hollow, but a solid piece of wood would work too.
I made a lid for the top, and glued it to the box. I made the lid a little larger, then squared the box and lid on the belt/disc sander.
It worked out that the lid was just about double the height of the crate, so I didn't have to add more nails to the jig. Now that the crate is assembled and squared, it's time for the fun! Use a scrap piece of material first to make sure the grooves are the correct depth and width. After this has been determined, place the crate or piece of wood against the guide, and simply push it along the guide. The reason for the V pattern is so the work piece gradually encounters the nail points as opposed to all at once.
I've included some photos of a sample jig that is exaggerated for easier viewing. The desired pattern width will determine how close the nails are, and will dictate how far to space them in the V pattern. The closer the nail points, the longer the V should be.
The hardest part is getting the points spaced properly and the correct point height; this is trial and error, and each new project may require a different nail spacing.
I wanted my crates to be banded and reinforced, and unfortunately there's no jig for that, so the cross bucks and banding are individually cut and applied.
Don
Scoring Jig for board lines 001.jpg

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Scoring Jig for board lines 003.jpg

Scoring Jig for board lines 004.jpg

Scoring Jig for board lines 005.jpg

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Some workshop aids

Here are photos of a few things that help me out. Maybe one will help you too.

First these wood holders keep expensive hobby liquids like cement, and paint from spilling. Per Murphy's law the liquid would probably spill onto something you worked hard on and just finished. :eek:
Also all these products seem to get a lot more expensive, nearly every day.:rippedhand:

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:

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Carrying/storage case

I've used these plastic fishing tackle boxes to hold N-scale cars and locomotives, for years. They do a good job of protecting the rolling stock, and are very handy when transporting it to a club.
HO-scale modelers might check their local Home Depot for straight storage boxes with removable dividers. Some are large enough to hold HO cars.

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:

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Socket saver

This one's not train related, but I thought I'd share it anyway. Some socket sets come in metal boxes, with a thin, flimsy, plastic insert. Sooner or later the insert cracks and the sockets go all over the place. Then you have to hunt through the random pile of loose sockets to find the size you need.
I made this wood insert from a piece of 1"x3" lumber cut to fit the box. The bottom edge of the wood is tapered to hold the sockets in order. Some foam insulation tape stuck to the bottom wall of the box, holds them in place. I rough drilled and carved slots for the ratchet handle and extensions. This insert should outlast the original one many times over.

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:

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Fantastic!

I made an escutcheon plate and door knob from a brass rod. For the knob, I used a file to make the profile. I wanted it smaller, but it separated before I could get it any smaller. The escutcheon is from the same rod; I hammered it into a thin strip, then cut out the size I wanted. I may re do the knob, as it's a little to big. I'll try a brass brad nail. I forgot that I have some in the shop.
View attachment 295274

View attachment 295282
I also made a desk phone from a piece of composite deck material. It's easy to machine, and it has a semi- hard and smooth finish. For the receiver, I used a paper clip. I think it too is a bit large, so I have some finer and softer craft wire that I'll try. For the cord, I'm going to use some very fine craft wire, or possibly a single strand of electrical wire. I was thinking of coiling it around a thin rod, (less then 1/32" dia), but coiled cords came a bit later then the time period I want to model. For the dial, I used a thin plastic lid, and used two tiny washers and drew around the inside with a black ink pen, the used a sharpened paneling nail to pierce the rotary dial holes.

View attachment 295290
Here is a photo of the completed phone. Someone on another forum wanted a reference for size, so I used the tape measure. I didn't want to waste another post for a few pics, so having time left, I added to this post. Next project is a coal scuttle. I'm using a foil lid from an iced tea container.
Don
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Don F.

Absolutely beautiful work!:appl:

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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loco internal wiring, what a miserable time i have finding replacement wire. So after scrating my head and spending countless hours looking for an appropriate speaker type wire small enough, i tripped over something else, litterally. old school house phone wire. very fine, looks good on the inside of the loco, but because its solid core it is still in the test phase for me, and needs to be adressed properly in install. solid core is stiff by comarison, and as we all know trucks dont like stiff. to compensate for the stiffness you must have enough slack under the cab to mitigate the stiffness. i have one old "tester loco" that i like to use when trying new odd stuff like this. on the one truck i hve positioned slack, ran the wire up from truck, towards the front of the loco, then to the center where the motor is. long enough wire to have next to no stifness, and the wire is stiff enough to keep its shape on its own. on the other truck i stole a design from under the hood of your car. a coil. I wrapped the wire around a very small nail, removing the nail after, and stretched the new coil out so there were gaps between the coils. solder on truck then straight to motor and presto. a working loco. so far so good. no issues. so as i said this was done on an old tester, wont be on my track for long so as for longevity, i dont know. but in a pinch it for sure will work if done correctly
 

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loco internal wiring, what a miserable time i have finding replacement wire. So after scrating my head and spending countless hours looking for an appropriate speaker type wire small enough, i tripped over something else, litterally. old school house phone wire. very fine, looks good on the inside of the loco, but because its solid core it is still in the test phase for me, and needs to be adressed properly in install. solid core is stiff by comarison, and as we all know trucks dont like stiff. to compensate for the stiffness you must have enough slack under the cab to mitigate the stiffness. i have one old "tester loco" that i like to use when trying new odd stuff like this. on the one truck i hve positioned slack, ran the wire up from truck, towards the front of the loco, then to the center where the motor is. long enough wire to have next to no stifness, and the wire is stiff enough to keep its shape on its own. on the other truck i stole a design from under the hood of your car. a coil. I wrapped the wire around a very small nail, removing the nail after, and stretched the new coil out so there were gaps between the coils. solder on truck then straight to motor and presto. a working loco. so far so good. no issues. so as i said this was done on an old tester, wont be on my track for long so as for longevity, i dont know. but in a pinch it for sure will work if done correctly
24 gauge super flex stranded wire is great.. Try it, you'll like it..
 

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small gauge flexible wire

For small gauge flexible wire, I take a set of audio earbuds, cut off both ends and strip the outer jacket off. The two center cores (left and right) are usually a common rubber/plastic covered copper wire. The braided common is sometimes copper coated fine string, and not useful.
 
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