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Discussion Starter #1
This may have been mentioned here already but if not this my experience with Molotow Chrome paint.
In the past when I have replaced headlights, I would shape then polish the reflector area and finally tin plate it with my Caswell Brush plater.
It gave a decent finish, better than the silver paint most manufacturers use. Then this paint came along. Its very easy to use but for the best finish let it drip out rather than wipe on as you would use a magic marker. This lets the highly reflective bits come to the surface before the paint dries.
Here are the results on the Precision Scale NYC headlight (the style all of the manufacturers should be using on their NYC big steam).

Before with tin plating.
NYC_Headlight_before.JPG

After painting:
NYC_Headlight_after.JPG

Here is what the product looks like. In pen form with 1-5mm tips and bulk which can be used to refill the pens or in an airbrush.

Molotow.jpg

Here is a headlight (tin plated) on a Lionel J3a 5444. The one above will go on J3a 5433.

J3_Front1.jpg



Pete
 

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That is superb!

I've had similar results with Rustoleum metallic silver spray. Shiny and reflective, and seems to tolerate the heat of being near a bulb, too.

Metallic paints today are a lot better than they were ten years ago. I dealt with about ten I tried in my Gold Bonnet B unit repaint, and all were good, although only one was even close to the color/shade/patina I needed.
 

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I agree that Molotow is quite a find. I have used the pens and the refill but I have not airbrush sprayed yet from the latter. The reflective qualities of this ink (that's what it is, not a paint) are very impressive.

It does take a long while to dry and will dissolve if it comes in contact with isopropyl alcohol. But that aside it does not rely on a reflective undercoat (like Alclad II and certain other "chrome" effects finishes) and for small detail parts like the ones you picture is a much easier solution than anything else I have tried. :smilie_daumenpos:
 

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And I like the idea of the pen ALOT. I'm ordering some for work on model cars, etc. So much easier to do trim and bumpers with that.

Great idea!!
 

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Wow!! Pete the reflectivity and realism of that headlights is top notch!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I picked up the bulk tubes with the intent of painting a set of MTH Texas Special cars. These were one of few with highly polished metal sides ( stainless, aluminum??) and now they are just done in the typical dull silver paint.

Pete
 

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Great product Pete, thanks for posting.
 

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I'll have to get one of those pens, that looks super!
John buy just one? :p
Different head sizes to them. Need one of each.

I wonder how long they keep in the applicator?

Cool product though not cheap. (like me :p)
Thanks for posting.:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Depending on how you plan to use this one size may actually be all you need. I think the different sizes would be useful if you want to draw lines like a marker pen but for a highly reflective application you want the ink to flow. The tips are actually spring loaded. Press down to start the flow. Move the pen when its covered in ink and you get a silver line. Hold it there for a few seconds and ink flows leaving a small puddle. For a mirror finish you want a wet coat.
The learning curve is very short.
I bought a 1mm and 4mm. The headlight was done with 4mm. 1mm might be useful for 1/48 vehicle mirrors.

Pete
 
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