Model Train Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,796 Posts
So I have peco pl10 which recommends a 16v power supply. I thought I had one that was 16 but cannot find it or was mistaken when reading it. I have plenty of 12v but I doubt thise will work unless I'm mistaken on that.

The only thing I have (that I can actually use) is a old laptop variable power supply.
Is there anyway to get it to work?

Taking a pic of it

View attachment 593217
Conductorkev;

Yes, either the 12 volt supply, or the 15-20 volt one shown in your photo, should work. The Peco PL-10's coils should work fine on 12 volts. Since the computer supply goes up to 20 volts, you might want to add a 15 volt regulator between it, and your PL-10s. However, as the current through a PL-10 is momentary, its not likely that an extra 4 volts will do any harm.

Traction Fan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,796 Posts
It was a universal power plug for laptops. Any idea which is hot/cold/ground?
Conductorkev;

Technically speaking*, the output wires from the cord you opened will not be "hot" or "ground". The output wires will carry 15-20 volts DC. One of those two wires will be positive, and the other negative. The two center wires should be checked with a volt meter set for a low DC voltage range like 20 volts DC. Touch the meter probes to the two center wires of the output cable that you cut open, while the power supply is plugged into a wall outlet. The meter should read either 20 volts DC, or -20 volts DC. If the reading is -20vdc then reverse the probes. When you get a reading of 20 volts DC the red meter probe will be on the positive output wire, (which you called "hot") and the black meter probe will be on the negative wire. (which you called "ground") As others have said, the outer mesh wire is likely a "shield" , and does not need to be used for your powering PL-10s project.


* The input plug that goes into the wall outlet is where you will have an actual "hot" of 115-120 volts AC and a "neutral" which is the AC return wire, which is at zero volts AC. Strictly speaking, There is no "ground" conductor, since the plug does not have a third prong.

Traction Fan
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top