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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have peco pl10 which recommends a 16v power supply. I thought I had one that was 16 but cannot find it or was mistaken when reading it. I have plenty of 12v but I doubt thise will work unless I'm mistaken on that.

The only thing I have (that I can actually use) is a old laptop variable power supply.
Is there anyway to get it to work?

Taking a pic of it

Grey Font Communication Device Gadget Cemetery
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Conductorkev;

Yes, either the 12 volt supply, or the 15-20 volt one shown in your photo, should work. The Peco PL-10's coils should work fine on 12 volts. Since the computer supply goes up to 20 volts, you might want to add a 15 volt regulator between it, and your PL-10s. However, as the current through a PL-10 is momentary, its not likely that an extra 4 volts will do any harm.

Traction Fan
I'm putting a cdu in between them. It's probably going to be 7 I'm going to do this way and eventually get them on a decoder.. so it shouldn't hurt the cdu either way?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The pic was a bit out of focus, but it appears to be of concentric shielded coax design of some sort, not common on power supplies -- IME power conductors usually rely on an in-line choke to suppress noise, rather than shielded wires.

Coax always has a solid wire in the middle this Is like 3 of the wire mesh (like coax).

See if this pic is better

Finger Thumb Wood Nail Automotive tire


The black was the outside coating the long strand went next. Stripped came to the mesh in the middle then the smaller one was inside that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yep, still looks like coaxial cable, but with concentric inner layers rather than either a single inner conductor (like that used for TV, other RF or older computer network wiring), or a single shield around braided conductors. Still not a clue why they would go to the trouble and expense of using such an unusual configuration for a pedestrian power supply connection, though.
It was a universal power plug for laptops. Any idea which is hot/cold/ground?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I'm pretty sure the outer braid would be ground, and if the power supply offered multiple voltages, I'd guess the inner braid and center conductor will each show varying voltages to ground, and likely between them as well. As I said, time to break out the multimeter -- this is not something you want to trust to analysis alone!

Hate doing anything with live exposed wires..... I would put the meter on DC right
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The receptacle plug suggests it has no ground wire, just like a floor lamp.
If there is a wide blade and narrower blade on the plug, the wide is neutral (white), the narrow is the line/load side (black). If you can check for continuity between the line/load blade(prong) and the center conductor you’ll figure out which is white & black.
No need for “live” wires when checking continuity. One probe on the narrow plug blade, put the other probe on the central conductor. If 0, try on the surrounding shield wires.

The outer most steel mesh is probably reinforcement and nothing more.

I get volts when I have one on center mesh and either of the other two. When I try the other two not the center I get probably less than halfthan when trying with the center.

The other end goes into what is converting the power. The side I took off to expose the wires is a small round plug thst you see going into laptops. I'll see if I can expose the connections in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So on the wall plug end, put the red probe on… well either blade. And red or black probe doesn't matter. The other probe on the center conductor.
When checking for continuity you’re looking for the meter closing a circuit, aka the probes seeing each other through that transformer. If 1 probe is on white and one is on black, you’ll get nothing. If both are on white OR in black, they should show continuity through the transformer. Knowing which blade is which will tell you which stripped wire is hot and which is neutral. Wide blade is always neutral/white.

The plug in side is only two prong into the wall
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Don't mess around with the unknown.
Just do what I did, buy from Home Depot the transformer
for a door bell. It has 18 v AC output. That powered my Capacitor
Discharge Unit. The CDU powered the 20 plus Peco
Insulfrog turnouts using Peco PL10 motors.

Don

What something like this?


What you wire the wires in back to a plug or directly into your power and hook the cdu thru the two screws in front?
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
The transformer input wires connect to the
two plug BLADES not to the tubular. There was
no ground on the transformer I used, but if
there is a ground on the one you get it's
ground wire would go to the tubular prong.

Don
Ya wasn't getting that computer plug working so got the doorbell transformer and it worked on a pl11 going to try a pl10 when I get a chance. The wire instructions are not that good for them I know one side you hook together and goes to one of the poles on the spdt. Now on the other side does it matter which is the common which goes to the transformer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Make sure you use momentary contact switches for the P 10's motors. Other wise you will burn them out.
For P 10's, either side coming out of the transformer connects to the center post on the motor. The other side coming out of the transformer goes to the center post of the SPDT momentary switch. The outer posts of the switch goes to each of the outer posts of the motor.
I'm using a cdu but still using spdt. On off on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Another thing to consider is accidental actuation while working/operating. To resolve that some folks recess said toggles into a pvc cap, but a colored safety cap works too. Some safety caps are illuminated (extra $) but I’m not sure if they could be modified with bi-color LEDs to indicate which way the turnout position is. But that’d be kinda neat if it’s possible.
I was going to try it, but….
Vader voice I have altered the deal… pray I don’t alter it any further.

Ya that would be cool


With the pl 10 or 11 do I have buy something else to have signals on my panel?
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
You may have a supply for a Dell. It uses some kind of handshaking to the computer and power supply to work together. I'd use a meter, find the two wires that produce the 15 volts and tape up the other one. If none of the combinations give the 15, then I'm "stumped" also on how to get it to work.

I gave up the readings were all over the place so I bought a transformer that works after testing just need to finish installing it.
 
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