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Another thing to consider is accidental actuation while working/operating. To resolve that some folks recess said toggles into a pvc cap, but a colored safety cap works too. Some safety caps are illuminated (extra $) but I’m not sure if they could be modified with bi-color LEDs to indicate which way the turnout position is. But that’d be kinda neat if it’s possible.
I was going to try it, but….
Vader voice I have altered the deal… pray I don’t alter it any further.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Another thing to consider is accidental actuation while working/operating. To resolve that some folks recess said toggles into a pvc cap, but a colored safety cap works too. Some safety caps are illuminated (extra $) but I’m not sure if they could be modified with bi-color LEDs to indicate which way the turnout position is. But that’d be kinda neat if it’s possible.
I was going to try it, but….
Vader voice I have altered the deal… pray I don’t alter it any further.

Ya that would be cool


With the pl 10 or 11 do I have buy something else to have signals on my panel?
 

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You have a couple options. Peco makes a device that sits on the bottom of teh PL10, and it has a switch that reciprocates with the movement of teh PL10. It can be attached and used to send juice the right light, could be LED or could be incandescent.

I have a few of them, but they are really old. They are in their original packaging. I have no use for them. I'd be happy to give you the ones I have. I think they are called PL13s
 

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I was going to say leaning yes although I’m not sure how. I had mine hooked up to a stationary decoder. Of the 6 solder tabs I think the center two were unused? I remember power came in on two of the 6, a jumper between 2 others. I think the center two could be utilized for either a powered frog polarity, or an LED/bulb, or both. But I’m not sure how to wire them for that as I used CTC routing so blade position was never a concern for me.
 

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So I have peco pl10 which recommends a 16v power supply. I thought I had one that was 16 but cannot find it or was mistaken when reading it. I have plenty of 12v but I doubt thise will work unless I'm mistaken on that.

The only thing I have (that I can actually use) is a old laptop variable power supply.
Is there anyway to get it to work?

Taking a pic of it

View attachment 593217
The power supply is called a switching supply. there should be NO continuity between either of the wall plug pins and the DC output wires. That is isolation for your protection. If you still have the connector you removed from the end, I assume it is the kind with a 'hole' in the center surrounded by a metal sleeve. Look at the bottom of the power supply, where it says energy level V the wire going to the outer sleeve is your negative, which is indicated by the wire going to what looks like the letter 'C' the positive wire goes to the black dot, inside the 'C'. Those should be the two wires inside the braid or aluminum shield. That shield is to keep any RF noise from being radiated and possibly interfering with any electronics. The reason you do not have a 3-wire power cord is that the narrower pin, the 'hot' lead is completely insulated from any external frame you may come in contact with, drill motor, etc. That 2 wire plug is basically a polarized plug. The wide pin is the neutral wire, not to be confused with the ground wire which would be the round pin on a 3-pin plug. If you look at the back of a wall outlet you will see a black wire which is the 'hot' wire it goes to the golden-colored screw on the outlet, while the 'neutral' white wire goes to the silver screw and the ground most likely is a bare wire that goes to the green screw on the side of the outlet.





So I have peco pl10 which recommends a 16v power supply. I thought I had one that was 16 but cannot find it or was mistaken when reading it. I have plenty of 12v but I doubt thise will work unless I'm mistaken on that.

The only thing I have (that I can actually use) is a old laptop variable power supply.
Is there anyway to get it to work?

Taking a pic of i
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
You may have a supply for a Dell. It uses some kind of handshaking to the computer and power supply to work together. I'd use a meter, find the two wires that produce the 15 volts and tape up the other one. If none of the combinations give the 15, then I'm "stumped" also on how to get it to work.

I gave up the readings were all over the place so I bought a transformer that works after testing just need to finish installing it.
 

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Don’t give up on that power supply for future projects. The circuitry inside is designed to give a variable voltage based on the amount of load. A DMM has very little load while reading voltage so the power supply will not really react well to it. Putting a 12v automotive light across the center and inner shield wires should stabilize the voltage, then you can read it at the bulb, and it should be around 15v at that point. Don’t worry about the bulb being a 12v bulb and the power supply being 15 to 20v as an automotive bulb is designed to work properly around 15v anyway as that’s what your vehicle‘s alternator produces. Many computer power supplies will not show a stable voltage until a load is applied to it. This goes especially true with the box type from tower computers.
 
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