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Discussion Starter #1
Hi: I need some cobblestone for a 19th century warehouse lot and some rough stone for a wall about 3" tall max and 2' long. I'd rather not build either stone by stone, any recommendations?
 

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Maybe aquarium gravel. I bought a small bag at the wally world for ballast. I didn't like it as it was just too white for ballast. It is very fine small.
 

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There are textured styrene sheets, textured foam cards, and textured paper cards from a variety of manufacturers.
 
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Hi: I need some cobblestone for a 19th century warehouse lot and some rough stone for a wall about 3" tall max and 2' long. I'd rather not build either stone by stone, any recommendations?
Murv2;

There is a way to use real stone and not have to lay it stone-by-stone.
The N-scale lighthouse, and keeper's cottage, in the photo were both made using this method.
I started the lighthouse with a cone-shaped piece of foam from a craft store. I coated the cone liberally with white glue and then rolled it in a flat array of small stones from my yard. I let that dry overnight, The next day, I dribbled sone watery plaster over the stones. Then another overnight drying. Finally I sanded the excess plaster off, exposing the stone wall with it's plaster"mortar" between the stones. No tweezers lifting individual stone into place!
The cottage was done the same basic way, but using molds to cast the individual walls from plaster over a bed of stones. The next day I glued the walls together and added plaster filling where needed on the corners. Again, sanding off any excess plaster and revealing the stones. If you click your mouse on the title line, "Cape Rip lighthouse" you can enlarge the photo enough to see the stone wall more clearly. If you click a second time, anywhere on the enlarged photo, it will enlarge even more, and you'll be able to see the individual stones.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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There is also foam cobblestone strips used for road surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys, a quick trip to hobbylinc found some of those items you are talking about. Also, does anyone know of a big piece of mining equipment, like for a flatcar load?
 

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Thanks guys, a quick trip to hobbylinc found some of those items you are talking about. Also, does anyone know of a big piece of mining equipment, like for a flatcar load?
Murv2;

There are models of draglines, and giant mine dump trucks available. Both those are for strip mining. There are several models of "coal mines" which are basically mine head house structures for a conventional underground mine. They would be way too big for a flatcar load though. If you go to www.walthers.com you will be able to see what's available.

Have Fun;

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm looking for the sorts of things that would be inside the mine. The warehouse is reinforced to haul really heavy equipment but it would have to fit inside the building. Some of the mine carts might be a good thing to put around as decoration. My layout is theoretically pre-automobile.
 

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I'm looking for the sorts of things that would be inside the mine. The warehouse is reinforced to haul really heavy equipment but it would have to fit inside the building. Some of the mine carts might be a good thing to put around as decoration. My layout is theoretically pre-automobile.
There have been models of mine cars made, and even some small track for them. Timber beams would also be a large, and continuously-needed item to shore up the inside of the mine.
Preiser, a German company, makes excellent human figures in all the popular train scales. Some sets include items like picks & shovels, and also construction workers who could be miners. They make horses and wagons too, since your layout is pre-automobile. Since you're back in the 1800s, there wouldn't be much mining machinery for your flat cars to haul.
Back then, mining was extremely hard labor done with picks, shovels, sledge hammers and "star drills" that were held by one man called a "shaker" and hit by a huge, "John Henry" type guy with a sledge, (hence the name "shaker" for the poor guy holding the drill.) The shaker rotated the drill a little between hammer blows. Eventually a hole was drilled deep enough to push sticks of dynamite into the rock encasing a coal/gold/silver vien that was being mined. Blasting broke up the rock/ore/coal into pieces small enough to be hand-loaded into the mine carts. Donkeys, mules, miniature horses, or men, moved the carts out of the mine, or to the vertical hoist shaft to unload them. The mine would need lots of small stuff, lanterns, tools, dynamite, food, water, etc. But, apart from the timber shoring, and mine cars, not much big stuff.

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For your time period, how about a flatcar full of laborers with pickaxes and shovels? Not exactly "large" mining equipment, but it would be an interesting piece, and that would have been their 'bus' ride to and from work.
 

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Murv2;

There is a way to use real stone and not have to lay it stone-by-stone.
The N-scale lighthouse, and keeper's cottage, in the photo were both made using this method.
I started the lighthouse with a cone-shaped piece of foam from a craft store. I coated the cone liberally with white glue and then rolled it in a flat array of small stones from my yard. I let that dry overnight, The next day, I dribbled sone watery plaster over the stones. Then another overnight drying. Finally I sanded the excess plaster off, exposing the stone wall with it's plaster"mortar" between the stones. No tweezers lifting individual stone into place!
The cottage was done the same basic way, but using molds to cast the individual walls from plaster over a bed of stones. The next day I glued the walls together and added plaster filling where needed on the corners. Again, sanding off any excess plaster and revealing the stones. If you click your mouse on the title line, "Cape Rip lighthouse" you can enlarge the photo enough to see the stone wall more clearly. If you click a second time, anywhere on the enlarged photo, it will enlarge even more, and you'll be able to see the individual stones.

Traction Fan 🙂
That lighthouse looks great.

I've ended up with a fair amount of gravel in several small sizes by sifting out a bag of "Sand Mix" cement. I ended up with a couple of gravels, sand and a fine cement powder that have all been used in various modeling projects. An incredible amount of modeling supplies form one 7 buck, 40 pound bag. I haven't compared sizes yet, but I might even be able to use it for my track ballast.
 
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