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As I suspected, you're trying to run them in parallel, that's the most inefficient way to do the job! In addition, you don't really have to run these at 10ma each unless you need that level of brightness. Also, since you have these all in parallel without any diode protection, you are subjecting the LED's to about 20V reverse voltage, about four times their maximum reverse voltage specification! If you really must run this way, try to arrange half the LED's to be reverse polarity so that they provide diode protection to minimize the reverse voltage the LED's see.

FWIW, my LED regulator modules have a maximum current output of 45ma, and for lighting an 18" passenger car, I very rarely run the current at anywhere near the maximum as it makes the lighting way too bright for realistic lighting.

You might consider a buck switching module for powering these, they're WAY more efficient than providing a heater for the cars. Parallel connection for the LED's won't be an issue if they're powered with this module.

AC/DC to DC Buck Step Down Adjustable Converter 5V 12V Rectifier Filter Module
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As I suspected, you're trying to run them in parallel,....
\John, that's the way the LED strings come, in parallel. And, I believe, the OP's tank car is semi- translucent tank car. Either way, there's no place to hide a regulator. It's just a "fairy" LED string (e.g., minimal footprint) to light up the car. It's just easier this way. In's not a high-end passenger car with interiors warranting constant lighting. In my post #8, I had a small building. It was just easier to go the resistor route even though I had the AC to DC regulators on hand.
 
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