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Keep in mind you'll need a separate reverse loop controller for
each isolated section.

As to the yard 'inside' a reverse loop; Not a problem, however,
all yard and any other tracks connected to the isolated
section will be an electrical part of the section.

With DCC you can have either wired or wireless (recommended)
hand held controllers. Most systems allow fascia 'jacks' for wired
controllers. You can plug and unplug them as you move about
the layout. Wireless, tho, avoids getting tangled in the
wire. 'You'll need to check what is available
in the brand of DCC system you select.

Don
 

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using controller in this context IMHO is confusing the issue. What is used is an "automatic polarity reverser module" for each reversing section. Most of the newer tech ARs are also circuit breakers (digitrax's once popular AR1 is one of the few holdover old single purpose designs) so they also protect your command station.
 

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I was thinking that the yard and reverse loop wasn’t going to be “scenic” more of a hidden way to turn around and let the kiddos put trains together without disrupting the layout. Also, the want a separate controller for yard.
That's fine. Whatever works for you. The "yard within a loop" configuration is very common on model railroads, just not on real ones. I have a yard within a loop on my own layout.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 · (Edited)
Oh. Yes. A reverse module per loop. How does it work if you have Spurs off the loop?

also currently we have a Bachman EZ command DCC that we got with first set years ago. Is it possible to work the yard with it and set up the main layout with another controller?
 

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The only polarity reverse that needs to take place is when the train crosses the entrance turnout. After that any included spurs function as normal. The polarity needs to be reversed to correct a direct short in the track. It has nothing to do with the loco's direction or speed which is controlled by the throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Ok. So if I have a huge reverse loop, the turnout that starts the loop gets isolated. Got that. What if you have a turnout off the loop that connects back to the main?
 

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Every yard, spur or other DEAD END track connected to the
isolated section uses the power of the isolated section.
Any track connected to the isolated section
that goes back to the main should have a gap or
insulated joiners where it connects to the isolated
section.

There can be only ONE DCC main controller on
a layout. You cannot use the EZ DCC system as a
2nd controller. Any wired or wireless hand held
must be of the same make as the main controller. However,
some DCC systems will permit use of a DC power pack as a
2nd controller. Consult your owners manual for
wiring instructions.

Don
 

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Easiest way to decide if you have a reverse loop is to draw a careful trackplan showing both rails. trace over one rail with a red pen, trace the other rail with a blue pen. If you run across a turnout where the red rail runs into the blue rail, you have a reverse loop. the legs will need to be isolated and have a polarity reverser connected to prevent a short.
 

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It is always touch and go to suggest reverse loop situations
absent a track drawing. My posts are based on what
the OP has said or asked in his posts.

Don
 

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then you have 2 reverse loops.
Ummm.......... I disagree with that. The way I read it, you still have only one big reverse loop. You have merely added another location that needs insulated rail joiners.


It is always touch and go to suggest reverse loop situations
absent a track drawing. My posts are based on what
the OP has said or asked in his posts.
Don
Yes. Agreed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
This is what I got so far. In no way, shape or form is this a plan. Just screwing around l. I know we want 2 mains, I like the yard siding with the dead end track to get off the main. Any other ideas,changes, suggestions? I don’t know where to put a crossover to get to the inner main. I have a double crossover that’s trouble free but I heard their in realistic.
 

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Looking at your drawing...you have ONE reverse loop in the lower right and within it is
a yard. This is very simple. Use a gap or insulated joiners in both tracks below the
turnout that creates the 'reverse loop'. The yard tracks inside it
are therefore a part of the 'reverse loop' and take the same
output of the 'reverse' device.

For clarification...a DCC layout has only ONE DCC controller. However,
a reverse loop requires a device to automatically match phase (polarity).
This device is generally referred to as a 'reverse loop controller'. It is
usually located under the benchwork near the 'isolated' section it
powers and requires no operator attention once installed. It's input
is your main DCC bus.

Don
 

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A common novice planning mistake IMHO is to lay down a track design that "looks interesting, complex, or fills up the available space", then add the rest of the scenery, structures, etc wherever they will fit. Instead I recommend taking note of the way 1:1 railroads (and I) do planning. First they identify the location (in modelling terms, the terrain and era) and the purpose of the line (i.e. passenger service, goods transportation, classification /switching, major or multiple industries/commodities, interchange, equipment repair/servicing,,,) Next, they will decide what areas or regions they can efficiently service, and set those as the major way points. Third they might identify industries and/or people that need rail service at the way points and along the route. Then finally they decide what is the most cost effective way to connect and service those points that also allows for return traffic (modelling: point to point, turn around, continuous loop) based on the terrain (natural and man made obstacles) and use of available space. This will also need to take into account the type equipment that will run on the line. In our model world that sets parameters such as minimum radius of curves, length and location of passing sidings, elevation changes, types, locations and size of yards and/ or switching/storage sidings.
I develop the plan as a whole, not as cobbled together bits, pieces, and afterthoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Played around a little today. Got it pretty close to drawing. I’m kind of glad I decided to recycle the KATO track from old layout. It lets me make a track plan, roughly, and see it in action before I lay down “permanent flex.” AND i can run trains. Lol
 

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New plan, similar. No double main. Haven’t decided on yard layout. need to see what fits when I start assembling.

maybe a bridge scene where the tracks come close to each other in the middle.

nsmustang55ol;

Now you know where the term "dog bone" track plan came from. 😊

I strongly agree with scenicsRme's response above. There are two schools of thought on this issue though. If what you want to end up with is a geometric shaped track plan, on which trains can just run around and around, then this plan fits that bill. On the other hand, If you want a track plan that in some way looks, and operates, like a real railroad, then this isn't it.

As scenicsRme's response implies, the first consideration in track planning something with realistic operational possibilities is to sit back and think like a real world railroad company would. Why are we spending millions of dollars on this long, double-tracked bridge? Is it just so that we can "exercise" our locomotives by having them drag the same cars back & forth across our new expensive bridge? How do we make a profit by doing that?

A track plan based, at least a bit, on real world concerns about making that profit will have sidings built to serve industries. I most cases, industries that existed in some basic form, before the rails arrived, Having rail service made shipping the raw materials in, and/or products out, much more efficient.

As examples; farmers could transport their crops to the nearest village by horse & wagon, but with the railroad, they could ship to distant cities, and make more money.
Logging companies could move their timber by dragging it with oxen to the nearest river, but with a railroad, they could move more timber, directly from forest to distant sawmill, faster and more efficiently.

The profit-making potential is what caused real railroads to be built in the first place. When a particular railroad became unprofitable, due to competition, it was abandoned. To make our model railroads appear realistic, we need to show why the railroad exists. We will still want the option of continuous running, but if it is disguised by breaking up the obvious "Round & Round" pattern, it will look more like a real railroad, one that was built for a real world reason, to make money.

Traction Fan 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
I like watching them go round and round. Mind you I have an 8 and 10 year old. the stub outs on bottom right will eventually lead to a yard/ reverse loop. this isn’t the definitive plan, just screwing around.

This is the add on that will eventually go on to give me a reverse loop and a yard where the kids cans build trains and send them off. We’ll be adding industries and sidings as we go along. Have an idea in my head. Not good at putting it on paper. The perspective is off.
 

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