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Discussion Starter #1
My son and I spent a few hours yesterday getting my dad's 1949 American Flyer train set up and running. (Quality no cell phone time with my 12 year old son is hard to come by.)
The locomotive is a #295, and we found that the shoe on the right side has a hole worn through it and the left is looking pretty thin. Any recommendations on where I can get replacements?
 

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My son and I spent a few hours yesterday getting my dad's 1949 American Flyer train set up and running. (Quality no cell phone time with my 12 year old son is hard to come by.)
The locomotive is a #295, and we found that the shoe on the right side has a hole worn through it and the left is looking pretty thin. Any recommendations on where I can get replacements?
If you're talking about the sliding shoes on the tender, you're 2 days late, I just sold a fellow member here my last 2 shoes. Your train should run without them...
 

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I also recommend reviewing the post nine down from this one. It was posted by Sagas titled Shoes. The picture may be helpful. We know of no source for the exact original replacements, PortLines are close.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The train runs fine until it hits any of the track switches. Half the time the train will stop, so we thought that it might not be getting enough current due to the hole in that piece. And since it happens at all four switches so I don’t think it’s an issue with the switches themselves.

(I apologize for the complete lack of correct terminology.)
 

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Try cleaning the metal wheels on the tender if you haven't done so already. From the picture they look dirty. Also clean the track and the switches. Isopropyl alcohol 91% works good and you can get it at any pharmacy. rub it on and you'll be surprised at the gunk that comes off. The wheels should be enough to pick up power for the engine. The shoes were used to help the Air Chime Whistle in the tender to pick up current. As a side note, the 295 was produced in 1951 only. Hope this helps.
 

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Do as Cramden says, those wheels look like they need a thorough cleaning. I see an arc spot on the wheel next to the worn out sliding shoe, that should not happen. See how it runs after cleaning the track, wheels and axle wipers. The 295 has the longer wheelbase 3 spring tender trucks so it should never stall on a turnout. If after cleaning it still stalls then it is likely the turnouts need to have the sliding contacts cleaned inside the base.
 

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I found some copper cleaner at my local grocery store that works great. It will make
those wheels look new. Bright and shiny. My cleaner is called Twinkle. Use it on the
axle wipes also. Easier if you remove the wheels from the trucks.
 

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I found some copper cleaner at my local grocery store that works great. It will make
those wheels look new. Bright and shiny. My cleaner is called Twinkle. Use it on the
axle wipes also. Easier if you remove the wheels from the trucks.
Mopac I've been using Twinkle for some time now. There is story behind why I started using it though. I bought a box of train odds and ends at an auction. The box had Flyer, Lionel, and Marx stuff in it and at the very bottom was the Twinkle so I thought the previous owner must know something I don't so I tried it out. Worked great. So now I am a buyer of Twinkle.

Kenny
 

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I could be wrong but looking at the photo the shoes would appear to be box type (normally used on diesel trucks with some exceptions) rather than the levered ones I mentioned in the earlier post. If they are mounted on the side of the trucks then replacements can be had but as flyernut pointed out, it will run without them. Barry
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I removed the shoes because they were causing so much sparking.

I tried cleaning the wheels with rubbing alcohol, and it got rid of some of the grime, but I think Twinkle will be my next step.

The engine ran when I had it off the track and put wires directly to the wheels on the tender, but it sparked like crazy and stopped/started on the track. I checked the power to the track with a voltmeter, and it was fine. So my guess is the wheels have 65 years of corrosion and dirt caked on them. I’ll spend some time cleaning the track too.

Do any of you use a dremel on the wheels? If so, which attachment? The white felt wheel or the brass brush?
 

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I use the brass brush wheel. If the wheels are brass the brass brush won't scratch them. If you can tell if they're steel or iron , then you can use the steel brush, but I usually stick with the brass one. Don't forget to wear eye protection, the bristles can and will come out while cleaning. Let us know how you make out.
 
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