Model Train Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I want to build my first layout. I chose this scheme of the railway road. As a basis, I will use the PIKO 97906 starter kit. I plan to start with a DC control. I chose this a DC control and switch control. There are a few questions:

1. Is the rail scheme good for the beginner who previously has not been engaged in the construction of such layouts?
2. Is the equipment correct for DC control and switch operation?
3. How is it to organize the control of two trains using DC control?
4. Is it better to start from DC or DCC for the newbie?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,457 Posts
Welcome. What is your location?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
If you want to eventually run more than one loco/train at once, I recommend that you get a "dcc starter set" instead of dc.

Are you in Europe?
Then take a look at the Roco dcc starter sets.
They include:
- engine
- cars
- track
- Roco z21 start dcc system
- Roco "MiniMaus" handheld controller

With one of these, later on you could add the Roco/TPLink router and move to wifi control on a smartphone or tablet if you wish.

They do cost a little more, but the extra money will be worth it.
If you buy dc first, then add dcc later, you may end up spending MORE in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,856 Posts
Welcome to the hobby and the forums.

The layout you have selected isn't a bad one to start with. It's nice and simple, and should allow you to get it built quickly without overwhelming you. I suspect, however that you will rapidly get bored with it, as their isn't much to do other than watch a train chase it's tail.

Running more than one loco at a time in DC is a headache, and that layout isn't really big enough to support it in any case. If you want to run multiple locos, then strongly consider investing in DCC right away. The Roco unit being shilled by by Mr. Albert is good, as are offerings from Digitrax, MRC, and NCE (if you're in North America).

I really don't know anything about the quality of the items you've selected. I suspect they're pretty much standard intro stuff: fair but not outstanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
215 Posts
I too am pretty new to the hobby though I did mess around with model railroading as a kid. Back then I ran DC and now DCC.

I agree that to run multiple locos DCC is easier to wire and more versatile than DC. Plus the lights are on even when the loco is stopped...I still like that :laugh:

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
Welcome aboard!

Hello. I want to build my first layout. I chose this scheme of the railway road. As a basis, I will use the PIKO 97906 starter kit. I plan to start with a DC control. I chose this a DC control and switch control. There are a few questions:

1. Is the rail scheme good for the beginner who previously has not been engaged in the construction of such layouts?
2. Is the equipment correct for DC control and switch operation?
3. How is it to organize the control of two trains using DC control?
4. Is it better to start from DC or DCC for the newbie?
ArniLand;

Welcome to the forum!

"Scheme":

The "'scheme" or "track plan", as we call it, is small, and simple. That's good for a beginner as you will be able to build it relatively quickly, but I agree with CTValley that you may get bored with it since you can't do much more than run a single train around a loop, and park & pickup cars from sidings. That last thing, being able to deliver, and pick up, cars is a step above many beginners track plans though. It does give you a little ability to operate your railway somewhat like a real one, which can help sustain interest.

The main problem with this layout is its small size. If you could expand it out longer, perhaps to an overall length of 2m-3m then you would not have track crowded in everywhere. That would leave more room for scenery, and buildings. Which will make the layout look much better.
Still, if you don't have enough room to expand the length of the layout, it's OK as it is now. I would say go ahead with it, but make it longer if you can.

Running two trains with DC:

Running two trains with DC control on this small a layout is not practical, especially for a new modeler who is just starting out.
Using DCC control would greatly simplify the wiring, and would make it easier to operate two trains. I recommend using DCC control.
However, the small size of this little layout means the two trains will need to be very short trains, with only a few cars each. They also won't have room to go very far, so the illusion of a train traveling a long distance, from one town to another, will be difficult to project or sustain. You will need to use a lot of imagination!

So, for learning the basic mechanics of building your first layout,this layout will be fine. A longer version will look, and operate, better, if you have the space for it.

Equipment:

Using DCC will mean using a DCC controller not the DC controller you have picked out.
The switch control will work with "switches" (we call them "turnouts") that use twin-coil solenoid mechanisms ("switch machines") to operate.
If you choose to use DC stall motors, or servos, as switch machines to operate your turnouts, you will need to use different electrical switches to control them. If you know enough about electrical controls to make your own turnout control panel (see photo) you will probably save some money, and learn from the process. If you don't want to do that, I would use turnouts with twin-coil machines. The British brand Peco is an excellent turnout, and can use a twin-coil electric switch machine, or simply be operated by hand. If you choose to hand-operate the turnouts, you won't need any "switch control" button unit at all, or any wires between that unit and the turnouts. This will save more money, and simplify construction.

The PDF files attached below the photo, have more information.

Good luck, have fun!

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:

Cedar Falls control panel.JPG

View attachment WHERE DO I START rev 4.pdf

View attachment All AboutTurnouts rev 5.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,644 Posts
MichaelE, one of our members is most familiar with
the Euro model trains you mention. He can advise you
on quality and other factors.

As to the question of DC vs DCC.

To control more than one train on a DC layout you
need two or more power packs. You also would need to break
up your layout in sections. Each section would have
a switch to select which pack is to power. You would
have quite a bit of wiring to do to make it work.

With DCC, you simply connect two wires from the
controller to your whole layout. You can then run 2, 3
or more trains, each individually controlled. No
extra equipment, no complicated wiring. However,
each loco would need a DCC decoder installed.

Obviously, DCC simplifies the layout wiring and also
simplifies the operation.

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
If you want to eventually run more than one loco/train at once, I recommend that you get a "dcc starter set" instead of dc.

Are you in Europe?
Then take a look at the Roco dcc starter sets.

They do cost a little more, but the extra money will be worth it.
If you buy dc first, then add dcc later, you may end up spending MORE in the long run.
I already have the PIKO 97906 starter kit and want to extend it. It is possible to have a 2m length of track for me. Could someone please advise a good track plan for me base on 2m length and Piko's rails?

I'll look on Roco dcc starter set. How does it switch the turnouts using DCC?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,457 Posts
I am not familiar with either brand of starter sets nor how points are switched for either.

My Roco, TRIX, and A.C.M.E. equipment was purchased separately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
"How does it switch the turnouts using DCC?"

Here's a video showing how the z21 can control turnouts with a digitrax controller.

The track and switches used are Kato, but it will probably work just fine with any other powered turnout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
operating turnouts with DCC

I already have the PIKO 97906 starter kit and want to extend it. It is possible to have a 2m length of track for me. Could someone please advise a good track plan for me base on 2m length and Piko's rails?

I'll look on Roco dcc starter set. How does it switch the turnouts using DCC?


ArniLand;

Can you tell us which European country you live in?

In order to operate a turnout with a DCC controller you need a device called a "stationary decoder" for each turnout, or a "multi-channel stationary decoder" with one channel used for each turnout. For example, some stationary decoders have four channels, so that one decoder could operate four turnouts.
You don't have to operate your turnouts with your DCC system. In fact, many modelers choose to use their DCC system to run the trains, and operate their turnouts in other ways. For electric, remote turnouts they use a separate power supply, and a control panel like the orange one in the photo I sent you earlier. Or they could use that separate power supply to feed electricity into that "Switch Controller" you showed us in your earlier photo. The separate power supply can be a simple mobile phone charger, or a DC controller.
Which way you control your turnouts is your choice. Either way will work, but you will need the stationary decoder(s) or a power supply and a switch controller or you could build your own control panel. The other option, and the least expensive is to control your turnouts manually. The PECO turnouts I recommended have manual control built right into them. Some other brands do too. In England, and maybe in your country too, they use different names for things. They call turnouts "points" and what we Americans call switch machines they call "point motors." Do you have a model railway club, or a store that sells model trains, near where you live? They might be able to help you with your questions about European equipment. We don't have those same brands in the USA, so we can't answer questions about the European items very well.

Good luck, have fun!

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos: From San Diego, California, USA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Hey or better I say Strasdvutje Tovarish...

Welcome aboard here.

At Ukraine do you using maybe the same power system of central europe by 230 V +/- 10 % 50 Hz ~ AC Power from power plant?

The z21 of Roco is a well cheap DCC Central Unit for the beginner but it does not have the full functions what are needed by operation of turnout controlling via WLAN Android Mobile phones or the Roco WLAN Multimouse.
The bigger and more expensive Z21 central DCC Unit has all what you need to control your trains and interlocking operations.

The Piko DCC units are well, too for the beginner but more than driving trains you cannot doing.
It does not provide the full range of 28 possible functions, I think more than 5 funktions are impossible to handle with it.

The Piko A-Tracks with roadbed are Code 100 Tracks with a smaller Railfoot than other rails, it is similar to walthers shinohara tracks but even in code 100.

Piko has an easy track geometry and it is cheap to get it in central europe.

Better you will look for retailers or hobby shops in Czechian Republic they do have a smaller V.A.T. of 16 % than Germany with actually 19 %.

Use SCARM to plan your track figures easily or any other open source track planner.

Ya Ingo
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top