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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone

I am new to this world and have a
GE AC4400Cw the drive wheel make
sound like they are dry. ? How and
what type of oil would I use.

thank you

lonewolf
 

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New? Used? Scale/gauge?

For a modern O gauge diesel, I use one or two drops of Labelle 107 or Excelle heavy on each bearing. Some folks use Mobile 1 for bearings. Also a drop on each side of the pickup roller. The gears get a dab or two of Labelle 106 or Excelle NLGI1. Some folks use red and tacky for gears.
 

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Welcome to MTF, lonewolfwalker, glad you're here.

The reason to use oil specially made for today's loco's is the formula will not disturb the plastic gears.
Regular oil will eat away at plastic, destroying your gears.

I myself use LaBelle 102. I found it sticky enough to adhere to the gears while the trains are running.
No oily tracks to clean.
Make sure you wipe up as much excess as possible, that helps also.
 

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Maybe oil isn't the answer

Hello everyone

I am new to this world and have a
GE AC4400Cw the drive wheel make
sound like they are dry. ? How and
what type of oil would I use.

thank you

lonewolf
lonewolfwalker;

Your N-scale locomotive may have a problem that oil wont fix. There is a tendency to over oil. Locos seldom need oil, especially new ones, since they're greased at the factory. That first, factory, lubrication with grease should last for a year, or more.
Have you taken the shell off, and looked to see if the wheels, or gears are rubbing against something? Another possibility is that a gear has become loose on its shaft and isn't spinning normally.
While you're looking at the gears, you should notice grease on them. If there is none, then I'm mistaken with my guess, and they actually are dry, as you suspected. Locomotives need very little grease, and in my opinion, no oil. Oil may stay in place and never migrate around the locomotive, and/or onto the track; or not! It depends on the type of oil. Grease, on the other hand, will definitely stay in place. That's why the manufacturer uses it.
Labele makes a plastic compatible grease # 106 I believe. If, and only if, the gears are actually dry, with no grease at all, put a bit of grease the size of a match head on one of the gears in each truck. The worm gear is best, but any gear will work. Then run the loco. The grease will form a thin film all over the gears and that's all the lubrication the loco needs. To much grease or oil is not good. It will not help the loco, only attract dust and dirt into it.

Regards;

Traction Fan:smilie_daumenpos:
 

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Welcome to MTF, lonewolfwalker, glad you're here.

The reason to use oil specially made for today's loco's is the formula will not disturb the plastic gears.
Regular oil will eat away at plastic, destroying your gears.

I myself use LaBelle 102. I found it sticky enough to adhere to the gears while the trains are running.
No oily tracks to clean.
Make sure you wipe up as much excess as possible, that helps also.
Smart move, Ron! That 102 is hands down superior to grease because as you say, it's "sticky"
I only started to use it a few months ago but I must say that I am more than impressed.
Guys, locomotives DO need oil! Motor bearings, axles, and worm shaft bearings all need oil, just very little. Keep a swab handy and when you put apply the oil, immediately soak up any excess. The only lube that's doing any good is what finds its way into the bearing surfaces anyway, but it is necessary.
Sure have been a lot of oil questions lately.
 

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I got a new lionel GP 38 last month. The manual says if the gears look dry, grease them.
Good advice for any scale. I agree with Time Warp. Motor bearings and axle bearings need oil. Very small amount. Very seldom will oil stay on the gears. You need grease for gears. It is more sticky.
 

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Should the wheel bearings on freight cars be oiled too? I like to run a long consist and have been wondering about this. Might be an all weekend project if so lol.
 

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I use dry graphite for metal axles to plastic trucks. Really works. If you and your
son have ever built a pine wood derby car for scouts, you know you can not win
without dry graphite.
 

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Dry graphite would work. Check those plastic axles for burrs or flashing on the ends.

They make a tool that's reams and cleans and smooth's where the wheels go.
It called a truck tuner. About 25 bucks. I want one. Guys that have them say they work for better rolling.
 
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