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I am in the process of getting a spare room ready for an O-gauge whole room layout. I am looking at getting the benchwork from Mianne. Does anyone have any experience with this product? I like the idea that you can take it apart easily and move it when the time arrives. Any other suggestions that would be helpful?
 

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I have no experience with Mianne. I seem to recall it took John a while to get his Mianne benchwork made and delivered.

I used 2 X 4s for mine. Do you have a table saw? If I had it to do over again, I would use L-Girders. I did make up some C-Channels for my staging area and they seem to work well.
 

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If time and money are no object, then it is definitely a nice solution.

With just a little advanced planning on your part, though, any benchwork can be made to break down and reassemble easily. Just use carriage bolts and wing nuts in your assembly instead of glue and wood screws. If you already have some basic woodworking tools, it's not hard to do.

You can also look at Sievers, who make a similar product: http://www.sieversbenchwork.com/
 

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Sectional benchwork

I am in the process of getting a spare room ready for an O-gauge whole room layout. I am looking at getting the benchwork from Mianne. Does anyone have any experience with this product? I like the idea that you can take it apart easily and move it when the time arrives. Any other suggestions that would be helpful?
LVDave714;

I'm not familiar with the Mianne benchwork, but if it consists of sections or "modules" that can be unbolted from each other and moved, then I think it's a good idea. I am a big fan of sectional construction.

Traction Fan :smilie_daumenpos:
 

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I just assembled a Mianne dog bone benchwork last weekend. Very easy to assemble the modules as it uses cams and dowels to link everything together using a Phillips screwdriver. Very sturdy. I also used a drill to speed things up. Here is what it looks like:

544403


But, I figured it would be easier to do a larger layout without any extra expense by putting the 4' x 8' sheets right on top of this. It fills in the 1' run between the ends and doesn't compromise on support nor strength. Now it looks like this:

544404


I fastened the sheets to the legs using 1" wood screws. Message me if you have any questions. The system is fairly expensive but you don't wrestle with heavy lumber, cutting, drilling, etc. At 73 with a bad back, this was my choice.
 

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I would cantilever some supports for that overhanging section. Over time, it will develop a sag from temp and humidity changes, and gravity.
 
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