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Railroad Tycoon
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Keep her inside tonight, some heavy duty storms rolling by tonight.
I think the bulk will miss us down here, but you are sitting in the way and should see some nasty stuff roll by.
 

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Nice car Spence. I never think about "car seasons" anymore down here, but remember having to when I lived in NY and PA. I drove my Mustang all winter long.

Enjoy it. Love the whole idea of it.
 

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My Alfa goes into hibernation every winter when it gets cold or right after the first salt or brine goes down on the streets (whichever comes first). Battery comes out and goes in the basement to be charged every other week. Comes out of hibernation when it gets warn after the first big rain washes the last salt off the roads. Salt wasn’t much of an issue this year.
 

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An Alfa. Great cars. Never had an Alfa that wasn't really an involving, exciting car. Cool in every way.

Italian cars are like that. I have only one old car now, an old Fiat I need to get out and fixed up, a pretty nice car actually if I'd put some time and money into it, but its probably not going to happen this year, either. Too much else.
 

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An Alfa. Great cars. Never had an Alfa that wasn't really an involving, exciting car. Cool in every way.

Italian cars are like that. I have only one old car now, an old Fiat I need to get out and fixed up, a pretty nice car actually if I'd put some time and money into it, but its probably not going to happen this year, either. Too much else.
It certainly is fun. A 74 spider that I’ve had since 76. It’s not unusual for people to ask about it at traffic lights. More often than not, they ask if it’s a Fiat. My cousin has a lovely GTV of the same vintage, but sadly, it’s been sitting for years because he hasn’t found the time or money to fix it up.

I’m guessing your old Fiat is a 124. C’mon Lee. You have the time now that you are retired. And I’m thinking you have the money. Send some bucks to Auto Ricambi. Or if you have more money than time, find a Fiat specialist to fix it up.
 

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Actually, my old Fiat is a lot older than that. It's a beat up Fiat 8V Zagato from 1954, that needs a lot of everything.

I had several Alfas years ago. One was a boxy Guilia sedan which looked boring but was fun to drive, and a 1300 cc Guilietta convertible that was a little jewel, and then a 1600 Guilietta SS coupe that was spectacular - fussy, but much faster in the top end than any other 1600 cc street car I ever saw. Really would like to have that car again.

Always wanted the GTV. A beautiful car. There is a classic Car and Driver road test article about it when it came out that was one of the two or three most memorable road tests I've ever read.

I think Alfa nailed it with the Spider in the early to mid '70s. They had cured the twerky handling problems the early Duetto had years earlier and the straight rear body looked better in my opinion. Mostly though the 2-liter engine had some torque which made it much better as a daily driver.

I forget which years had what: does yours have the variable cam timing feature - not sure when they did that?
 

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An 8V Zagato. Very cool. I had to Google it. Now I understand why it’s sitting. I don’t suppose parts are readily available.

I think the Milano V6 had variable valve timing, but mine is just a run of the mill twin cam with low tech bucket tappets. It requires oil with zinc which dictates Mobile One (the only oil readily available oil that has it these days).
 

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You are right. Parts are impossible to find the the 8V. The engines are sought after for 2-liter class vintage racing and parts for them and the trans and such - all standard FIAT car or truck parts mostly, are available. But the body nd interior? Not a chance - about twelve Zagatos were built. There are no records of where the trim and such came from. Taillights are from the Guilia sedan, the instruments from same, things like door handles, front grill, and such: most were parts taken or modified from other production cars at the time, but there are no records that tell what came from which car, etc. It is an impressive car, even considered its getting close to 70 years old, still sleek and fast (120 mph, 0-60 in 10 sec), and in 10/10 condition would sell for maybe $650 on the auction circuit. But restoring it? Lowest quote I got, twenty years ago, was 500 grand . . . I don't think a person could make money restoring it. I ought to sell it - the Fiat V8 was used in a lot of other sports and exotic cars at the time, and is used in vintage racing still. I could probably get a bit for it because the drivetrain because the engine has never been rebuilt - could be bored and machined and made better than new. But then, that would be work. As long as my son is content to have it sit in the back of his storage garage, I'll just leave it there.

BTW, I looked it up because I was curious if my mind was playing tricks on me. Alfa had one of the first variable valve timing systems, but it was first used on the 1980 Spider.

Here is some interesting data about it:
 

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Motor Trend has a TV series "Iron Restoration". They take old cars and restore them from the ground up, including custom made parts to replace originals. I just saw the show were they started on an AC Cobra.

Maybe you could strike a deal. Would be a heck of a retirement coup ...
 

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Ah Geez, that looks just like I dreamed mine would look some day. At that value I have to re-think having it restored. I'm not going to dump multi hundreds of K into a 10/10 restoration, but maybe do some contingency deal with the restoration shop: they take their $800K or whatever it costs to restore and we split the remainder 50/50.

It is such a gorgeous car. The amusing thing is the factory body was downright silly/ugly looking.
 

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My Alfa goes into hibernation every winter when it gets cold or right after the first salt or brine goes down on the streets (whichever comes first). Battery comes out and goes in the basement to be charged every other week. Comes out of hibernation when it gets warn after the first big rain washes the last salt off the roads. Salt wasn’t much of an issue this year.
As well you should hide it for the winter! I had a 1974 Fiat Spider 124, bought it new in 1974, and sold it in 1976. All the black painted parts in the engine compartment were shedding their paint with a solid coating of rust under it! I cleaned it all off, painted them, and unloaded it before it dissolved into a rust spot on the driveway! :eek:
 
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