Model Train Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,668 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Its been many, many years since this guy was on the rails. A Lionel Southern Pacific SD-9 that was released by the TTOS many years ago. It is convention operation, a terrific runner and a very nice paint scheme. It will spend a week or so on the layout then return to hibernation.

Bill

P4230012.JPG


P4230012.JPG
P4230013.JPG


P4230014.JPG


P4270022.JPG


P5010025.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,064 Posts
Nice engine. Being a fan of GP7s and 9s, the SD versions are even better! I have only a couple MTH SD9s.

I ran real ones when I worked on a railroad in PA. They were big, powerful and smooth runners...

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,589 Posts
What is the actual length of a SD-9. I am thinking right around 60 feet, is that correct ?

Bill
In my search to answer that question, several interesting sites came up

These have a brief description/history and the quantity of SD9s purchased by a roster of railroads. And links for other loco bios.

SD9 SD9

This one has the detailed spec.'s on the SD9 and answers Bill's question. But you'll have to click to see if Bill's correct.

SD9 Spec.'s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,668 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
In my search to answer that question, several interesting sites came up

These have a brief description/history and the quantity of SD9s purchased by a rsoter of railroads. And links for other loco bios.

SD9 SD9

This one has the detailed spec.'s on the SD9 and answers Bill's question. But you'll have to click to see if Bill's correct.

SD9 Spec.'s
I knew the GP-7's were right at 56 feet and that the SD were a few feet longer, thats why I thought around 60 feet. Some folks think the SD's were a large diesel but they were just a tad larger than the GP's.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,000 Posts
That’s a good looking loco, but I think J. Albert is right. I have a Lionel Illinois Central GP-9 in front of me and the shell looks the same as the SD-9. Lionel was known to make the loco model fit their existing frame so they probably just put on 6 wheel trucks and called it an SD-9. Nevertheless, as I said, it does look nice.

I’ve thought about getting an SD-9, but haven’t seen one that would make me pull the trigger. I’ll have to look again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,668 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
That’s a good looking loco, but I think J. Albert is right. I have a Lionel Illinois Central GP-9 in front of me and the shell looks the same as the SD-9. Lionel was known to make the loco model fit their existing frame so they probably just put on 6 wheel trucks and called it an SD-9. Nevertheless, as I said, it does look nice.

I’ve thought about getting an SD-9, but haven’t seen one that would make me pull the trigger. I’ll have to look again.
What would be the scale difference in a GP-7 at 56 feet and a SD-9 at 60 feet. Thats only 4 feet in real life measurements. Back in those days Lionel probably was not going to spend the bucks on new tooling for a 1/2 inch or so size difference.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,000 Posts
What would be the scale difference in a GP-7 at 56 feet and a SD-9 at 60 feet. Thats only 4 feet in real life measurements. Back in those days Lionel probably was not going to spend the bucks on new tooling for a 1/2 inch or so size difference.

Bill
A 4 foot difference in O scale would be 1”. The MTH RK scale GP-9 and the Lionel (PW and MPC) GP-9 are both 14 ¾” long. The MTH SD-9 is 16”. Not much of a difference, but it is noticeable.

And you are exactly right about Lionel not wanting to spend the bucks on tooling. They would “scale” the locomotive to fit an existing frame. The Lionel 44 tonner is an interesting example where they stretched the shell to fit an existing frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,668 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
A 4 foot difference in O scale would be 1”. The MTH RK scale GP-9 and the Lionel (PW and MPC) GP-9 are both 14 ¾” long. The MTH SD-9 is 16”. Not much of a difference, but it is noticeable.

And you are exactly right about Lionel not wanting to spend the bucks on tooling. They would “scale” the locomotive to fit an existing frame. The Lionel 44 tonner is an interesting example where they stretched the shell to fit an existing frame.
When Lionel released the 44 tonner back in the mid fifties, electric trains were considered toys and that guy was at the low end of the totem pole in pricing. Not to many rivet counters back in those days. I am guessing a significant majority of toy train operators back then never saw a real deal 44 tonner.

Bill
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top