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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The rails are made of solid brass, and the ties are UV resistant plastic so they don't breakdown with constant exposure to the sun. With little care, they last forever outside, in rain, snow, sleet etc. Just need the rail tops clean periodically to keep up the electrical connectivity, just like smaller scales, but less frequently it seems.

Brass oxidizes nicely if you leave it outside for a couple months. The track setup in the picture I left outside for about 2 months.

LGB's famous marketing slogan was that it could withstand an elephant stepping all over the track. I have a picture of it somewhere in the old catalogs, it's pretty comical.
 

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Outside railroads are more fun then I ever thonght they would be. The weather is not the worst of it. You also have to contend with bugs, rodents, birds, dear, the family dog, grand children, and vandals. Now if that isn't close to a real railroad I don't know what is.

I am in Florida and we don't have a problem with snow but you better know something about drainage. A spring shower for us is from 2" to 6" of rain. That can washout a lot of track if it isn't done right.

Large scale railroading outside is just like building a full scale railroad. You have to be able to deal it all. Including convinceing the chairman of the board that you need to dig up half of her backyard.

Then there is the gardening part.... OH my aching back....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Speaking of rodents, I bought a LGB 3071 DB coach from eBay, that appeared to be in good condition, but on closer inspection it appeared something had gnawed at the accordion doors on one side (it's a combination mail / passenger car) and gnawed away many of the interior details. The outside still looks fine and I will probably run it on my trains.

Even more disturbing.. It looked like the box was full of dried up blood that some small animal had crawled in there and .. well, you get the picture :eek:
 

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Outside railroads are more fun then I ever thonght they would be. The weather is not the worst of it. You also have to contend with bugs, rodents, birds, dear, the family dog, grand children, and vandals. Now if that isn't close to a real railroad I don't know what is.

I am in Florida and we don't have a problem with snow but you better know something about drainage. A spring shower for us is from 2" to 6" of rain. That can washout a lot of track if it isn't done right.

Large scale railroading outside is just like building a full scale railroad. You have to be able to deal it all. Including convinceing the chairman of the board that you need to dig up half of her backyard.

Then there is the gardening part.... OH my aching back....
I used to be a landscape arcitect in SF. I did not just sit in the office. I went out and surveyed the propery and gave free estimates. The weather can be a pain, but proper planning and design are the key.

Now that I think about it I am suprised that none of the wealthy clients ever asked for a G scale train landscape design. I know some very wealthy people with money to burn. I will have to get in touch with my old partner. $$$
 

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My dad says that the tracks I have from when I was a kid are a combination of two kinds. Weatherproof ones and non weatherproof. Is this possible?
 
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